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March 2009 Briefing - Family Practice

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for March 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Safe Practice Scores Do Not Add Up to Fewer Patient Deaths

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- In hospitals, higher self-reported scores for improvements in safe practices do not correlate with reduced mortality rates, researchers report in the April 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Little Clinical Evidence to Support Bed Bug Treatments

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Although bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) have been associated with dozens of human diseases and their bites are treated with a range of drugs, there is no clinical trial-based evidence for the efficacy of treatments, and there is little evidence that they are communicable disease vectors, according to a review published in the April 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Housing for Homeless Alcoholics May Reduce Public Burden

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Health care use and costs for chronically homeless people with severe alcohol problems are substantially reduced when they are provided housing without the precondition of abstinence from alcohol, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Lower Cancer Risk Seen in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with multiple sclerosis have an overall lower cancer risk, which does not appear to be due to heredity, according to the results of a study published in the March 31 issue of Neurology.

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Late Preterm Birth May Increase Developmental Risks

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Late preterm infants have an increased risk of development disability compared with healthy full-term infants and should be monitored for early intervention if problems arise, according to a study in the April issue of the journal Pediatrics.

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Early Weight Gain May Predict Childhood Obesity

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of weight gain in the first six months of life can indicate childhood obesity, but one simple and effective intervention may be to encourage children to drink more water, according to two studies published in the April issue of the journal Pediatrics.

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Study Urges More Clinical Research on Gynecologic Testing

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- While professional guidelines call for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing in the follow-up of treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), there is insufficient clinical research to guide the clinician in the selection of the test to use, according to a report in the April issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Home Life and Popular Culture Pose Smoking Risk to Children

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking remains a serious health risk for children, who are exposed to secondhand smoke at home and then influenced to take it up themselves by its depiction in popular movies, according to two studies published in the April issue of the journal Pediatrics.

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Staff Education Can Help Reduce Elective Labor Inductions

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Staff education and more rigorous enforcement of guidelines for labor induction can reduce the number of unwarranted inductions and lower the cesarean birth rate for first-time births, researchers report in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Sample of Obese Subjects Led Very Sedentary Lives

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- In a small sample of morbidly obese individuals, their extremely sedentary lifestyles fell far short of common activity guidelines for cardiovascular protection, according to research published online March 19 in Clinical Cardiology.

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Protein Seen to Play Role in Herpes Reactivation

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Expression of a virion protein called VP16 appears to be necessary for herpes simplex virus to exit its latent state, according to research published in the March issue of PLoS Pathogens.

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Obese Women Face High First-Time Pregnancy Risks

MONDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Obese women who are pregnant for the first time have an elevated risk of preterm birth, cesarean section delivery and preeclampsia, according to a report in the April issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Home-Based Training and Therapy Extend Life in Elderly

MONDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Teaching elderly and infirm people how to safely perform daily activities and achieve personal functional goals can markedly extend their lives, according to a report in the March issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Children's Lung Function Linked to Genetic Variants

MONDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- In children, variants in GST mu genes are associated with decreased lung capacity and small airway flow, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Romantic Love Can Be Intense and Long-Lasting

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to what has been widely believed, long-term relationships don't necessarily kill romantic love, and many couples can maintain an exciting relationship that is positively associated with marital satisfaction, mental health and overall well-being, according to the results of a study published in the March issue of the Review of General Psychology.

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Early-Pregnancy Smoking Cessation Beneficial

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who stop smoking before 15 weeks' gestation can reduce their risk of spontaneous preterm birth and small-for-gestational-age infants to the same level of pregnant non-smokers, according to research published online March 26 in BMJ.

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NHLBI Discontinues Hypertonic Saline Trial

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S.-Canadian trial to assess in-ambulance administration of a hypertonic saline solution to trauma patients in shock from severe bleeding has been halted due to lack of a survival benefit, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) announced on March 26.

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Low-Income Men May Not Grasp Prostate Cancer Terms

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Low literacy levels among medically underserved men highlight the need to consider literacy and use non-medical language for prostate cancer education efforts and outcomes measures, according to a study published online ahead of print March 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Drinking Very Hot Tea May Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking tea before it has cooled down slightly is associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer, according to study findings published online March 26 in BMJ.

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Aspirin May Protect Against Cancer

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- People who take aspirin for vascular protection have less incidence of cancer, but only after 10 years of taking the drug, indicating that it may have a protective effect against cancer, according to a review published online March 27 in The Lancet.

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Mass Antibiotic Program Can Offer Trachoma Herd Protection

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Herd immunity to trachoma can be achieved through repeated rounds of mass antibiotic administration to children, who are a core means of transmission for the eye disease, according to a report published in the March 28 issue of The Lancet.

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Most US Adults Should Reduce Sodium Intake

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 70 percent of U.S. adults are in groups at high risk of hypertension and should reduce their sodium intake to less than a teaspoon of salt a day, officials from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report in the March 27 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Weight Gain Between Births Raises Cesarean Risk

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have developed gestational diabetes in a prior pregnancy and have gained more than 10 pounds of weight between pregnancies are at increased risk for cesarean delivery of subsequent babies, according to a report published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Omega-3s Linked to Prostate Cancer Protection

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Higher intakes of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids were associated with a lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer, which appeared to be modified by a COX-2 single nucleotide polymorphism, according to research published online March 24 in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Family Meals Help Teens Develop Healthy Eating Habits

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Family mealtimes in adolescence are associated with healthful eating habits later in life, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

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Same-Day IUD Insertion May Promote Contraception

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Offering women who seek walk-in pregnancy testing or emergency contraception same-day insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD) may be an effective strategy for promoting contraception, according to a report published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Report Calls for Separate US Food Safety Agency

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- A dedicated agency for food safety is needed to combat food-related health threats, according to a report, Keeping America's Food Safe, produced by Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

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Hundred Steps Per Minute May Be Good Fitness Goal

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Taking 3,000 steps in 30 minutes on most days of the week might be a good pace for people to follow to protect their health, according to research published online March 17 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Electric Current Leak Can Trigger Defibrillator Shock

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- An electric current leak that is not noticeable under ordinary circumstances can trigger a serious shock in someone who has an implanted cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), according to a letter in the March 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Circumcision Lowers Risk of Sexually Transmitted Disease

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- In a study of Ugandan men, circumcision reduced both the incidence of herpes simplex virus (HSV-2) and the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV), two co-factors in HIV/AIDs, according to a report in the March 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Cost Barriers Slow Adoption of Electronic Health Records

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Citing cost barriers, relatively few U.S. hospitals have adopted electronic health records, posing a major obstacle for policy makers who say health information technology is critical to the improvement of health care quality and cost-effectiveness, according to an article published online March 25 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Childhood Soy Intake May Help Prevent Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- In Asian American women, high soy intake during childhood is associated with a significantly decreased breast cancer risk in adulthood, according to the results of a study published online March 24 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Low Cholesterol, Blood Pressure Show CAD Benefits

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), those with the lowest levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and systolic blood pressure had the slowest progression of coronary atherosclerosis, according to research published in the March 31 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Light Eating During Labor Not Linked to Adverse Effects

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- In selected patients, consumption of a light diet during labor has no effect on obstetric or neonatal outcomes and is not associated with an increased incidence of vomiting, according to research published online March 24 in BMJ.

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Patient Concerns Hamper Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain Control

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Many rheumatoid arthritis patients are reluctant to take pain medications and tolerate more pain than necessary as a result, researchers report in the March issue of the Journal of Pain.

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Elevated Triglycerides Common Among U.S. Adults

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Among U.S. adults, hypertriglyceridemia is a common condition associated with physical inactivity, overweight or obesity. But the overwhelming majority of adults with hypertriglyceridemia are not receiving medical treatment for it, according to research published in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Americans Fear Chronic Disease Above All Else

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Although Americans fear chronic disease above debt, divorce or unemployment, their lifestyle choices put them at risk for diseases such as diabetes, according to a report released March 24 by the American Diabetes Association.

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Genetic Heart Disease Often Deadly for Children

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- A genetic cardiomyopathy that strikes children is associated with serious heart dysfunction and often death, according to a report in the March 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Collaborative Care Improves Chronic Pain

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients who experience chronic pain, those who receive a collaborative approach to pain treatment have improvements in pain and depression severity compared with usual care, researchers report in the March 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Burden of Alzheimer's Disease Triples Health Costs

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- People aged 65 and older with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia make Medicare and Medicaid claims that are three times higher than those of their counterparts without the condition, according to a report, 2009 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures, released March 24 by the Alzheimer's Association.

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Whole-Body Scans at Trauma Centers Save Lives

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Whole-body computed tomography (CT) should be incorporated into the standard diagnostic process during early resuscitation for patients with blunt trauma injury, according to the results of a study published online March 24 in The Lancet.

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Pediatric Anesthesia Linked to Learning Disability Risk

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple early exposures to anesthesia may be an important risk factor for developing learning disabilities later in childhood, researchers report in the April issue of Anesthesiology.

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Ovarian Cancer Screenings Show Low Positivity Rate

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- In older women, regular screening for ovarian cancer has a low positivity rate, suggesting that existing technology is not beneficial in the detection of early cancer, according to research published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Vitamin D Insufficiency Increasing in United States

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- About three out of four American adolescents and adults currently have insufficient levels of vitamin D, though oral vitamin D supplementation is effective in preventing fractures among older adults, according to two studies published in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Ginde
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Abstract - Bischoff-Ferrari
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Smoking Linked to Risk of Acute, Chronic Pancreatitis

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking is independently associated with an increased risk of pancreatitis, according to study findings published in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Family History Linked to First Venous Thrombosis

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- A family history of venous thrombosis is independently associated with an up to quadrupled risk of a first venous thrombosis, according to a study published in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Intensive Glucose Control Spikes Mortality in Critically Ill

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Intensively controlling blood glucose in a study group of critically ill patients increased their mortality rate and hypoglycemia in comparison to a group receiving conventional glucose control, according to research reported online March 24 in advance of publication in the March 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Dyspepsia May Improve With Dietary Changes

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with functional dyspepsia may have improved symptoms when they eat smaller meals with lower fat content, according to a study published in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Amniocentesis Linked to Loss in Twin Pregnancies

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Women pregnant with twins who undergo amniocentesis may face a higher risk of pregnancy loss, according to research published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Shift Away From Sweet Tooth May Signal End to Growth

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Growth markers are lower in adolescents who express a preference for less-sweet drinks, which may indicate that reduced preference for sugar signals an end to growth, according to a study published in the March 23 issue of Physiology & Behavior.

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Proteinuria Varies in Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- In children with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease, proteinuria may be associated with disease cause and race, according to study findings published online March 18 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Reirradiation May Extend Life in Head and Neck Cancers

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- For some patients, reirradiation of recurrent head and neck cancer can extend life. But for those with comorbidities or organ dysfunction, such as feeding tube dependence, it is likely to offer only palliative support, according to a report in the March 16 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Socioeconomic Status Impacts Cancer Mortality Rates

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Despite Sweden's nationwide health care, people with higher socioeconomic status have lower mortality rates for two common hematologic cancers than those with lower socioeconomic status, according to a report in the March 16 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Feeling Lonely Affects Health Perception of Older Adults

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- As well as social isolation, feelings of loneliness and lack of social support are associated with a poorer self-perception of health among the elderly, according to a report published in the March issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

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Continuing to Smoke Worsens Pain in Lung Cancer

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer patients who continue to smoke even after their diagnosis are more likely to experience moderate to severe pain, researchers report in the March issue of the Journal of Pain.

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Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Restenosis Similar With Stent

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Restenosis in patients with diabetes who have the TAXUS Liberte paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES) is similar to that for non-diabetic patients, according to a report in the March issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Immune Activation Renders Malaria Mosquitoes Resistant

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Gene silencing activates immune pathways in mosquitoes that carry malaria parasites and renders the mosquitoes resistant to infection, according to a report in the March issue of PLoS Pathogens.

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Aspirin Guidelines Updated by U.S. Preventive Services

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Before deciding whether to use aspirin to prevent heart attacks or strokes, clinicians should compare risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes, blood pressure, cholesterol levels and smoking against the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, according to a report published in the March 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Pregnant Women With Bowel Disease Face Higher Risks

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women with inflammatory bowel disease have an elevated risk of developing adverse pregnancy and maternal outcomes, according to research published in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Exercise Shows Endothelial Benefits After Heart Attack

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Both aerobic and resistance exercises appear effective in improving endothelial dysfunction in individuals after a first recent myocardial infarction, according to research published online March 16 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Lifestyle Affects Survival in Head and Neck Cancers

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle factors, particularly smoking, can have a negative impact on survival for patients with head and neck cancers, according to a report in the March 16 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Early Television Exposure Linked to Childhood Asthma

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- In early childhood, increased television viewing is associated with a higher risk of developing asthma in later childhood, according to the results of a study published online March 13 in Thorax.

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Botulinum Toxin Eases Symptoms of Frey Syndrome

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Frey syndrome, or gustatory sweating, who are given repeated treatments of botulinum toxin type A, experience less severe symptoms and a reduction in the area affected by the condition, according to a report published in the March issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

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Pressure Ulcer Prevention Important in Surgical Patients

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses should consider every surgical patient "at-risk" for pressure ulcers and devise an individualized plan to mitigate that risk, according to an article in the March issue of the AORN Journal.

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Illegal Immigrants Pose Ethical Dilemma for US Nurses

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Even though under federal law illegal immigrants in the United States for less than five years are not eligible for Medicaid, emergency department nurses have a range of ethical and legal obligations that require them to protect the safety of all patients regardless of their citizenship status, according to an article published in the March issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Depression Linked to Higher Heart Disease Risk

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is associated with a higher risk of developing coronary heart disease, which does not appear to be due to inflammation despite previous studies suggesting a link between inflammation and coronary heart disease, according to the results of a study published in the March 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Patients May Be OK With Watchful Waiting Over Tests

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Watchful waiting as opposed to ordering blood tests for patients with unexplained complaints was not associated with increased patient anxiety or decreased satisfaction, according to research published in the March/April Annals of Family Medicine.

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Endometrial Polyp Diameter Points to Risk of Cancer

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Among postmenopausal women without abnormal bleeding who are incidentally diagnosed with polyps, abnormal histology is only significantly associated with polyps greater than 18 mm in diameter, according to research published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Lymphedema Burden High After Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Within two years after breast cancer treatment, a significant number of patients develop lymphedema, resulting in a greater risk of complications and increased treatment costs, according to a study published online March 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Neck Injuries Common in Pediatric Homicide Victims

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Infants who die after abusive head injuries often have neck injuries, although these injuries appear to be only a contributing factor to most brain lesions associated with abusive head trauma, researchers report in the March issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics.

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Catheterization, Surgery Compared for Infant Heart Defect

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- The transcatheter implantation of the Amplatzer duct occluder in infants to correct the congenital heart defect known as patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is as effective as heart surgery with less risk of infection, a shorter hospital stay and less cost, according to a report in the March 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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NEJM Supports Medical Device Safety Act of 2009

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Passage of the Medical Device Safety Act of 2009 would nullify the U.S. Supreme Court's 2008 Riegel v. Medtronic decision -- which shielded medical device manufacturers from the potential consequences of failing to adequately disclose risks -- and significantly improve patient safety, according to an editorial published online March 18 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Premature Births Costly to American Businesses

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Employer health plans spend more than 10 times as much money to care for babies born prematurely to their employees as they do for healthy, full-term babies, according to a report issued March 17 by the March of Dimes Foundation.

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Seniors' Choice on Medicare Part D Often Not Cost-Based

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors are not motivated simply by cost alone when choosing which Medicare Part D plan to enroll in, according to a report published in March by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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Moderate Drinking May Improve Bone Health

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- In men and postmenopausal women, moderate alcohol consumption may be beneficial to bone health. In men, however, consumption of more than two drinks per day of liquor is associated with significantly lower bone mineral density, according to a study published ahead of print Feb. 25 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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DiGeorge Case Offers Example of Genetic Compensation

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Cytogenetic studies of the family of a child with DiGeorge syndrome highlights a case of genetic compensation, according to a report published in the March 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Report Describes Immune Response to West Nile

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- A scientist who was accidentally infected with West Nile virus in the laboratory has an immune response that could be exploited for therapeutics, according to a case report in the March 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Cytomegalovirus Vaccine Shows Promise in Women

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- A vaccine against cytomegalovirus (CMV) had a 50 percent efficacy in women of childbearing age, researchers report in the March 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Heart Failure Before 50 More Common in Blacks Than Whites

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- In a cohort of young black and white adults followed for two decades, the likelihood of heart failure before the age of 50 was 20 times higher in blacks than whites, according to research published in the March 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Budesonide Nasal Wash Not Linked to Adrenal Suppression

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- The use of budesonide as a nasal wash in adults with chronic rhinosinusitis appears to relieve symptoms without suppressing the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, according to research published in the March issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

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Over-Diagnosis Risk From Prostate Cancer Screening

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Screening for prostate cancer does not reduce the mortality rate after seven to 10 years' follow-up, according to study results released online March 18 in advance of publication in the March 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, while a second study in the same issue concludes that prostate-specific antigen-based screening does reduce mortality but runs the risk of over-diagnosis.

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Botulinum Drug for Wrinkles Found Well-Tolerated

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- The use of a botulinum toxin type A product (Reloxin) appeared to be well-tolerated and effective after repeated treatments, according to research published in the March/April Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Urinary Potassium Associated With Patients' Diet Quality

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Measurement of urinary potassium may be a simple way to detect a good or poor-quality diet, according to study findings published ahead of print Feb. 11 in the Journal of Nutrition.

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Study Finds Imaging Exams of Pregnant Women on the Rise

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Imaging examinations of pregnant women at one Rhode Island medical center increased dramatically over a recent 10-year period, in particular the use of computed tomographic (CT) examinations, according to a report released online March 17 in advance of publication in the May issue of Radiology.

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Guideline Aids Decision on Surgery for Birth Injury

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- A newly developed guideline may help determine which infants with obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI) would benefit from surgery, according to a study in the March issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics.

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Score Accurately Estimates 10-Year Diabetes Risk

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- A score that uses medical data and does not require laboratory tests accurately estimates 10-year diabetes risk, according to research published March 17 in BMJ Online First.

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Body Mass Index Alone Good Predictor of Mortality

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index (BMI) is a strong predictor of mortality risk both above and below the optimal weight range of 22.5-25 kg/m2, according to a report published online March 18 in The Lancet.

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Implantable Defibrillators Less Beneficial in Some Patients

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Implantable defibrillators in older patients with comorbidities or repeated hospitalizations for heart failure may produce only limited protection from sudden death, according to research published in the March 17 issue of CMAJ, the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

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Narcolepsy Drug Has Potential for Abuse and Addiction

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Modafinil, a drug used to treat narcolepsy and psychiatric disorders, increases dopamine in the brain and may have the potential for abuse and addiction, according to a report published in the March 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Medical Specialty Status Could Boost Nursing Home Docs

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Granting physicians working in nursing homes the status of medical specialists in their own right would help improve the quality of care for America's 1.6 million nursing home residents, according to an article published in the March 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Electrode Placement Affects Heart Failure Monitoring

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Monitoring of heart failure patients is more effective if electrodes are placed on the left side rather than the more commonly used right side, according to a study published in the March 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Protein Excess Implicated in Ovarian Cystic Disorder

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Ovaries from women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) produce high levels of nerve growth factor, and mice overproducing nerve growth factor in the ovaries develop cystic ovarian morphology and similar reproductive abnormalities as PCOS patients, according to research published online March 5 in Endocrinology.

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Borderline Arterial Pressure Linked to Mobility Loss

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with peripheral arterial disease and even a borderline or low normal ankle-brachial index (ABI), a measure of relative arterial pressures in the lower and upper extremities, are at higher risk of later mobility loss, according to a study published in the March 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Drug Reduces Bleeding in Elderly After Heart Ischemia

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- The anti-thrombotic bivalirudin (Angiomax) is effective in improving ischemic outcomes and lowering bleeding complications in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS), particularly in elderly patients aged 75 years and older who are at higher risk of bleeding, according to a study published in the March 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Low-Dose Acitretin Shown Effective in Nail Psoriasis

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Acitretin, a medication historically prescribed for skin psoriasis, is comparable to the biologic drugs adalimumab and infliximab in clearing up nail psoriasis, according to the results of a clinical trial reported in the March issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Aspirin Dose Over 100 mg May Do Heart More Harm Than Good

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- The optimum daily dose of aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular events is probably between 75 and 81 mg, as a 100-mg dose or more has no obvious benefit and may cause harm in patients who are also taking clopidogrel, according to a report published in the March 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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No Role for Androgen Receptor in Regulating Muscle Strength

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- The androgen receptor is important in maintaining muscle mass and fiber type but has no role in regulating muscle strength or fatigue, according to a study published online March 5 in Endocrinology.

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Information Could Help Ease Distress in Cancer Patients

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- A structured system of providing information to cancer patients showed some signs of reducing their psychological distress, according to research published online March 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Quinacrine Does Not Delay Course of Prion Disease

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Treating human prion disease with quinacrine does not reduce the mortality rate associated with the disease, according to a study published online March 10 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Studies Support Menopausal Breast Cancer Risk Screening

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence supports screening postmenopausal women for risk of breast cancer and the consideration of chemoprevention for women at high risk, as well as the use of lifestyle changes for cancer prevention, according to research published in the March 18 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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New Medication Relieves Hot Flushes in Menopause

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Menopausal women who experience daily moderate to severe hot flushes can reduce the symptom by daily doses of the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) desvenlafaxine (desvenlafaxine succinate), according to research published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Preterm Babies at High Risk for Learning Problems

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Babies born at 25 weeks' gestation or less are at high risk for learning difficulties in childhood, and the majority require some form of special educational support, according to a study published online March 12 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition.

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One in Five U.S. Adults Continues to Smoke

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Although smoking prevalence is declining nationwide, about one in five U.S. adults still smokes, and only one state has reduced smoking prevalence to the 12 percent or less goal established by Healthy People 2010, according to a report published in the March 13 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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BRCA+ Women Receptive to Prophylactic Mastectomy

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Women who test positive for the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation and are at high risk for breast cancer are more receptive to prophylactic mastectomy to reduce risk than women who test negative, according to research published in the Apr. 15 issue of Cancer.

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Drugs Still Best First Step for Non-Acute Heart Disease

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Medical therapy is still the best initial management strategy for non-acute coronary artery disease despite innovations in catheter-based treatment, according to a study published in the Mar. 14 issue of The Lancet, while a second study describes the positive initial findings of a phase II trial of SCH 530348, an oral platelet protease-activated receptor-1 antagonist used in percutaneous coronary intervention.

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Europe Missing Out on Heart Disease Prevention

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patient surveys conducted in three time periods between 1995 and 2007 show that European countries are missing the opportunity to reduce cardiovascular disease through preventive efforts, according to an article published in the Mar. 14 issue of The Lancet.

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Little Counseling for Males Carrying Cancer Mutation

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Many male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations do not seek genetic counseling, even though the mutations predispose them to breast and other cancers, according to a review in the February issue of the Journal of Genetic Counseling.

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Drug Errors Widespread in Intensive Care Units

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Errors in giving parenteral medications appear to be common in intensive care units around the world, according to research published online Mar. 12 in BMJ.

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Probable Carcinogen Found in Many Children's Bath Products

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Many children's bath products may contain formaldehyde and 1,4-dioxane, both of which are probable carcinogens, according to a report released Mar. 12 by the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, a coalition of organizations that calls for the removal of certain chemicals from personal care products.

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Injection for Hip Osteoarthritis Pain Found Ineffective

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A single intraarticular injection of hyaluronic acid for the treatment of hip osteoarthritis was ineffective in achieving significant pain relief in comparison to placebo, according to research published in the March issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Biomarkers Signal Women's Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated biomarkers of inflammation in the blood may help identify women with a higher risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis years before symptoms appear, according to study findings published in the March issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Bariatric Surgery Has Double Benefits for Diabetic Patients

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Most type 2 diabetes patients who undergo bariatric surgery see improvements, not just in weight loss but also in diabetes control, according to a study published in the March issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

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Drugs Don't Boost Survival in Older Heart Failure Patients

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- People over 80 years of age who have heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, a prevalent condition in the elderly, do not benefit significantly from commonly prescribed cardiac medications, according to research published in the Mar. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Testing Predicts Outcomes in Left Bundle Branch Block

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) are at higher risk of death and major cardiac events if they have abnormal results during exercise echocardiography, researchers report in the March issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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Too Much Sleep for Older Women Raises Mortality Risk

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Older women who report napping daily or sleeping nine or more hours in a 24-hour period are at increased risk of mortality from all causes, with the exception of cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Treatment May Reduce Inflammation in Diabetics

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Treating diabetic patients with reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) reduces inflammation, increases cholesterol efflux from macrophages and may be atheroprotective, according to study findings published in the Mar. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Ovarian Screening Tests Can Be Sensitive and Accurate

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Ovarian screening tests comprising transvaginal ultrasound and a CA125 blood test have a high degree of sensitivity and specificity, while transvaginal ultrasound alone is also highly sensitive but lacks the specificity of the combined screening test, according to an article published online Mar. 11 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Older Fathers Linked to Lower Intelligence in Offspring

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Children of older fathers are more likely to have subtle neurocognitive problems, while children of older women are more likely to have superior neurocognitive abilities, researchers report in the March issue of PLoS Medicine.

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Gluten-Free Diet May Be Useful in Wider Population

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A gluten-free diet may be beneficial for individuals with mild enteropathy and endomysial antibodies, according to research published in the March issue of Gastroenterology.

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Many Factors Affect Lymph Node Biopsy in Melanoma

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for clinical stage I and II melanoma is associated with socioeconomic factors, according to research published online Mar. 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Non-Simultaneous Transplants Can Increase Kidney Donation

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A series of 10 kidney transplantations initiated by a single altruistic donor demonstrates the potential of such chains to increase the number of transplantations and improve donor-recipient matches, according to a report published in the Mar. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Ozone Hikes Risk of Death from Respiratory Causes

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Increased concentration of environmental ozone exposure significantly increases the risk of death from respiratory causes, but does not significantly increase the risk of cardiovascular death when particulate matter (PM) concentration is also taken into account, according to research published in the Mar. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New Diagnostic Test Developed for Cardiomyopathy

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Testing myocardial samples for a reduced level of the desmosomal protein plakoglobin can be an effective diagnostic tool for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), according to research published in the Mar. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Hospitalists Providing Care for More Older Patients

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalists provided a rapidly increasing amount of care for hospitalized Medicare patients during a recent decade, according to research published in the Mar. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Tube Feeding Shows Benefits in Short Bowel Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Following the postoperative period, patients with short bowel syndrome may have greater nutrient absorption with tube feeding than oral feeding, according to research published in the March issue of Gastroenterology.

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US Diabetic Retinopathy Cases Set to Triple by 2050

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- As the number of Americans with diabetes continues to rise, so will the incidence of diabetes-related eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, cataracts and glaucoma, according to an editorial published in the March issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Migraines in Pregnancy Linked to Vascular Disease

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who experience migraine headaches are at increased risk of stroke and vascular disease, according to research published online Mar. 10 in BMJ.

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Age Affects Optimal Treatment for Spinal Metastases

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Although surgery for spinal metastases is generally superior to radiation, the treatment giving the best outcome is strongly affected by age, researchers report in the Mar. 1 issue of Spine.

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UK Hospitals Can Do More to Answer Recycling Call

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Social attitudes, legal barriers and logistical and institutional restrictions all undermine efforts to reduce, reuse and recycle waste in the hospital setting in the United Kingdom, according to an article published online Mar. 10 in BMJ.

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Folic Acid Supplements Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Folic acid supplementation may be associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer, and different definitions of "lead time" in studies on screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) can affect their outcome, according to two reports published online Mar. 10 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Anger, Hostility Linked to Coronary Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Anger, hostility and depression are associated with a higher risk of coronary heart disease in healthy individuals, according to two studies published in the Mar. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Routine Screening of Excised Breast Tissue Can Backfire

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Most plastic surgeons routinely send breast reduction tissue for routine histological testing, effectively screening women under the age of 50 for breast cancer without their consent, according to an article published online Mar. 10 in BMJ. Three related editorials discuss the surgical management problems, ethical dilemmas and implications for patients of such a practice.

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Vitamin C May Help Prevent Gout in Men

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- High vitamin C intake in men is independently associated with a significantly lower risk of gout, according to a report published in the Mar. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Diabetics Have Different Plaque Qualities

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acute coronary syndrome, those with diabetes have greater inflammatory status and more plaques with signs of vulnerability, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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Third-Generation Smallpox Vaccine LC16m8 Deemed Effective

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In unvaccinated or previously vaccinated adults, the use of the third-generation smallpox vaccine LC16m8 is associated with a high rate of seroconversion or booster response, and a low rate of adverse reactions, according to research published in the Mar. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Family Docs Provide Other Diagnoses at Prenatal Visits

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Family physicians were more likely to diagnose non-obstetric problems in female patients during prenatal visits than obstetricians, according to research published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Warmer Weather Linked to Increased Headache Risk

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Higher outdoor temperatures were associated with a short-term increase in headache risk, according to the results of a study published in the Mar. 10 issue of Neurology.

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Faster Diagnosis Benefits Acute Chest Pain Patients

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In low-risk patients who present to hospitals with acute chest pain, an accelerated diagnostic protocol may be associated with less impairment of quality of life than usual care, according to a report published in the Mar. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Specialists Spend Much Time on Routine Care

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial portion of medical specialists' office-based activity is devoted to routine and preventive care for known patients, for services that might often be handled by primary care physicians, according to research published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Over 6 Million Older Americans May Benefit from Statins

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 6.5 million older American adults have levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) that suggest that they may benefit from statin treatment, according to a report in the Mar. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Insurance Status Affects Access to Eye Care

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Uninsured Americans are far less likely than their insured counterparts to seek the services of an eye care professional, researchers report in the March issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Macular Degeneration Linked with Range of Illnesses

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients with age-related macular degeneration are more likely than their counterparts without the eye disease to experience a wide range of illnesses, including depression, hip fracture and blindness, according to a report published in the March issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Metabolic Disorder, Obesity Associated with Dementia

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obesity, and its associated metabolic disorders including diabetes, are linked with dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in a series of articles in the March issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Studies Investigate Health Care at End of Life

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- End-of-life health care may be associated with feelings of abandonment, and its associated costs are lower after physician-patient communication but higher among minorities, according to a series of studies published in the Mar. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Infective Endocarditis Remains a Lethal Threat

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Despite recent advances in diagnosis and treatment, infective endocarditis continues to be frequently fatal, with acute presentations more common than previously thought and a high rate of Staphylococcus aureus infection, according to study findings published in the Mar. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Children, Teens Most Likely to Survive Cardiac Arrest

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in infants approaches that of adults, is less frequent in children and adolescents, and children and adolescents are twice as likely to survive to discharge, according to research published online Mar. 9 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Vascular Risks May Speed Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Pre-existing vascular risk factors such as abnormal cholesterol levels and diabetes may be associated with an accelerated cognitive decline in patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, according to the results of a study published in the March issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Reduced Lung Function

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Metabolic syndrome is associated with a higher risk of lung function impairment, primarily due to abdominal obesity, according to research published in the Mar. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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No Link Between Wine and Breast Cancer Risk

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Higher alcohol consumption, with the exception of red and white wine, is associated with a greater risk of breast cancer, researchers report in the March issue of Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Simpler Apnea Treatment Model Deemed Effective

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A simplified model of diagnosing and treating obstructive sleep apnea can lead to outcomes that aren't inferior to those from in-hospital polysomnograms involving physicians, according to research published in the Mar. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Some Dietician Students Biased Against Obese Patients

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Undergraduate dietetics students have a moderate degree of fat phobia and display bias in their approach to treating obese patients, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Patient Confidentiality Versus Disease Prevention Reviewed

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The morality of patient confidentiality laws are questioned in recent research presented in a special report in the March issue of The Lancet Oncology.

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Obesity Linked to Altered Ovarian Follicular Environment

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- An altered ovarian follicular environment may help explain why overweight and obese women have more difficulty achieving pregnancy than normal-weight women, according to research published online Feb. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Distress Linked to Lower Activity in Cancer Survivors

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Colorectal cancer survivors who show high levels of somatization, or physical symptoms of psychological distress, are less likely to be physically active, while patients who have a more positive view of their cancer are more likely to be physically active, according to the results of a study published online Mar. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Young Males Drink More When Alcohol Portrayed in Media

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Watching a movie or commercials portraying alcohol use leads to higher total alcohol consumption among young men, according to research published online Mar. 4 in Alcohol and Alcoholism.

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Use of Stroke Prevention Services Can Be Improved

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- There is widespread underutilization of stroke secondary prevention services, according to a report published online Mar. 5 in Stroke.

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Exercise in Later Life Reduces Mortality Risk

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Men who increase their level of exercise later in life can bring their mortality risk into line with their counterparts who have constantly exercised, according to a report published online Mar. 5 in BMJ.

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Transdermal Patches Pose Burn Risk During Scans

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning about the risk of burns as a result of wearing medicated patches, such as those used for smoking cessation or pain relief, during MRI scans.

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Some Tocolytics Carry High Risk of Adverse Reactions

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who are treated with tocolytics to postpone preterm labor may be at high risk of a serious adverse reaction to the drugs, according to research published online Mar. 5 in BMJ.

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Black Neighborhoods Have Fewer Healthy Food Options

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Areas of Baltimore with a predominantly black or lower-income population have fewer healthy foods available than white and higher-income areas, according to two studies, one published in the December 2008 issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine and the other in the March issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Racial Disparities in Heart Failure Treatment Found

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Black and Hispanic patients eligible to receive cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) are less likely to receive therapy than white patients, and white patients are more likely to receive CRT-D outside of published guidelines, according to a report in the March issue of Heart Rhythm.

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Patient Anxiety Linked to Timing of Prostate Treatment

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Anxiety over the disease is a major predictor in older men's decision to begin androgen deprivation therapy early after biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer, according to research published online Mar. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Breathing Helium Improves Exercise in Pulmonary Disease

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients who breathe helium during pulmonary rehabilitation increase their exercise intensity and duration and improve their quality of life more than patients who breathe air, according to research published in the March issue of Chest.

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Alcohol-Themed Merchandise Affects Kids' Drinking Habits

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Non-drinking adolescents who own alcohol-branded merchandise such as hats and T-shirts may be more likely to start drinking, according to a report published in the March issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Positive Outcomes for Cancer Patients in Poor Condition

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Advanced colorectal cancer patients with poor performance status still derive benefit from chemotherapy, although with a higher risk of toxicity and death, according to study findings published online Mar. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Arm Fracture Raises Risk of Hip Fracture in Elderly Women

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly women who fracture their arm are at greater risk of fracturing their hip within a year, researchers report in the Mar. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Gastric Bypass Surgery May Improve Sex Life in Obese Men

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- In obese men, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery may be associated with increased production of reproductive hormones and improved sexual function, according to study findings released online Jan. 27 in advance of publication in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Mental, Drug Disorders High in Women Ending Welfare

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of mental health and substance abuse disorders is markedly higher among single mothers nearing the end of welfare eligibility compared with the general U.S. female population, according to the results of a study published in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Unnecessary Laparotomies Prevented in Pregnant Women

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- MRI can help to prevent unnecessary laparotomies in pregnant patients with suspected acute appendicitis, according to research published in the March issue of Radiology.

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Obama Wants to Spend $630 Billion on Health Care Reform

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Achieving health care reform is one of President Barack Obama's major challenges, and his newly released spending plan calls on Congress to commit $630 billion over the next decade to finance that reform, according to an article published online Mar. 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Defects in Hormone Cycling After Prenatal Testosterone

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Female sheep that were exposed to excess testosterone in utero have defects in reproductive hormone cycling, particularly if they become obese, researchers report in the March issue of Endocrinology. The observations may explain the anovulation observed in obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome, where excess prenatal steroid exposure may play a role in the disease.

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Vitamin Pills May Not Help Reach Intake Guidelines

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Taking dietary supplements can help patients reach recommended intake levels for calcium, vitamin C and magnesium, but this is not always the case and many adults are still falling short of the recommended intake, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Mepolizumab Beneficial in Eosinophilic Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Mepolizumab therapy reduces exacerbations and has other benefits in asthma patients with eosinophilia, according to two studies published in the Mar. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Testosterone Not Beneficial for Female Sexual Dysfunction

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Hypoactive sexual desire disorder is a common condition in Western women, but evidence suggests that treatment with transdermal testosterone patches is ineffective and potentially risky, according to an article published in the March issue of the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin.

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Short Gaps in Health Coverage Can Affect Children

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Even short periods without health insurance can reduce young children's health care access and utilization, according to research published in the March issue of Pediatrics.

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Marked Disparity in Incidence of Severe Maternal Morbidity

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Significant disparity exists in the incidence of maternal morbidity among women in the United Kingdom, particularly affecting black African and Caribbean ethnic groups, according to research published Mar. 3 in BMJ Online First.

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Parent's Bipolar Disorder, Offspring's Mental Illness Linked

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Children of patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder are at greater risk of developing psychiatric disorders, especially early-onset bipolar disorder, according to research published in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Suicide Risk Greater Following Post-Traumatic Stress

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after a traumatic event in childhood can independently predict attempted suicide risk, although trauma alone cannot, according to research presented in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Alcohol Linked to Modest Pancreatic Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol consumption is associated with a small increase in risk of pancreatic cancer, according to research published online Mar. 3 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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High Recurrence in Native American Infants with Clubfoot

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Native American infants with clubfoot living in rural areas and treated by the non-surgical Ponseti method are at high risk of recurrence due to low compliance with the bracing protocol, according to a report in the March issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Teens' Lipid Levels Predict Atherosclerosis in Adulthood

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who have abnormal lipid levels are at higher risk of developing preclinical atherosclerosis as adults, regardless of the lipid cutoffs used by two classification systems, researchers report in the Mar. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Arthritis Restricts Exercise in Heart Disease Patients

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease patients who also have arthritis are significantly less likely to engage in physical activity than those without arthritis, according to a report published in the Feb. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Abnormal Sleep Schedule Linked to Adverse Effects

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- An altered sleep-wake cycle such as that seen during jet lag and shift work can have wide-ranging metabolic and cardiovascular implications, according to research published online Mar. 2 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Adolescents at Risk for Vitamin D Deficiency

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial proportion of adolescents, especially non-Hispanic blacks and females, are deficient in vitamin D, according to a report published in the March issue of Pediatrics.

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Alcohol Abuse Raises Risk for Depression, Not Vice Versa

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol abuse/dependence leads to increased risk of major depression instead of vice versa, answering a much debated question regarding the link between these two events, according to research published in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Proton Pump Inhibitors May Reduce Benefits of Clopidogrel

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Acute coronary syndrome patients who are prescribed clopidogrel in combination with a proton pump inhibitor are at increased risk of adverse outcomes compared with patients prescribed clopidogrel alone, according to a report published in the Mar. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Oseltamivir-Resistant Flu Viruses Increasing

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The 2008 to 2009 influenza season will see a higher prevalence of oseltamivir-resistant viruses, and certain strains of the virus are highly pathogenic to high-risk patients, according to two studies published online Mar. 2 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Another study reports that intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccine is associated with more medical encounters than trivalent inactivated vaccine.

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Early Impulsivity May Predict Future Gambling

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Impulsive kindergartners may be more likely to become regular gamblers by sixth grade, according to research published in the March issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Vitamin K Doesn't Reduce Bleeding in Warfarin Patients

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In patients receiving warfarin, vitamin K does not reduce bleeding, according to study findings published in the Mar. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Outcomes Reporting May Make Physicians Risk-Averse

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Although clinical outcomes report cards perform a valuable public health purpose, the experience of publicly reporting death rates after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in two states suggests that doctors may become risk-averse and avoid high-risk patients, according to a review in the Mar. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Cardiovascular Risk Biomarkers Cleared By Kidneys

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Two biomarkers that reflect myocardial wall tension and are used to assess the risk of cardiovascular disease are cleared by the kidney, and therefore correct concentrations rely on proper renal function, researchers report in the Mar. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Patient Connectedness Predicts Level of Primary Care

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Patient-physician connectedness is associated with a greater likelihood of receiving guideline-consistent care, according to a report published in the Mar. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Infant Television Time Not Linked to Cognition at Age 3

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Television viewing during infancy does not influence cognition in children at age 3, and restrictive labels only increase the attractiveness of video games to children, according to two studies published in the March issue of Pediatrics.

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Physicians Urged to Implement Nutritional Guidelines

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- To reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, physicians should learn behavior change and motivational interviewing strategies aimed at changing eating habits in children and adults, according to a Scientific Statement published in the Mar. 3 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Meningococcal Disease in Maine Well-Reported

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The reporting of meningococcal disease cases in the state of Maine reached the 98 percent level between 2001 and 2006, but only 56 percent of cases were reported within a day of admission to hospital, according to a report published in the Feb. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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MET Gene Variant Linked to Autism, GI Disorders

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Alterations of the MET gene, encoding an enzyme involved in brain development and gastrointestinal repair, may be associated with an increased risk of autism spectrum disorder with associated gastrointestinal dysfunction, according to research published in the March issue of Pediatrics.

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Racial Disparities Seen in Post-Heart Attack Outcomes

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with myocardial infarction, overall outcomes are significantly worse in blacks than in whites. But the differences are attenuated after adjustment for patient characteristics that differ by race such as socioeconomic status and co-morbid conditions, researchers report in the Mar. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Marathon Runners Have Less Hypertension, Diabetes

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Marathon runners have lower prevalence of hypercholesterolemia, diabetes and hypertension compared to non-marathon runners, according to a report published in the March issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

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Swim Lessons Variably Affect Children's Drowning Risk

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In very young children -- but not in older children -- formal swimming lessons may significantly reduce the risk of drowning, according to study findings published in the March issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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US Motor Vehicle-Related Death Rates Vary Geographically

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Although the mortality rate related to motor vehicles remained almost unchanged from 1999 to 2005 in the United States, on closer inspection the data reveals wide variations from state to state, as well as by gender and ethnicity, according to a report published in the Feb. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Glycemic Control Approaches Lead to Similar Outcomes

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Different approaches to glycemic control in type 2 diabetics following myocardial infarction were associated with similar risk of later cardiovascular events, according to research published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

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Incidence of Sick Leave at Iranian Car Company Examined

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Workers in Iran, a middle-income country, take little sick leave for neck and shoulder pain compared with workers in high-income countries, researchers report in the Feb. 15 issue of Spine.

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Much Lung Cancer Disparity Appears to Be Due to Smoking

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking appeared to explain much -- but not all -- of the inequality in lung cancer risk attributable to differences in education in a large sample of Europeans, according to research published in the Mar. 4 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Age Stereotypes Affect Disease Risk Later in Life

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- People who have negative views about aging are more likely to have a cardiovascular event later in life, according to research published online Feb. 13 in Psychological Science.

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Americans Losing Sleep Over Financial Woes

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Concerns over the state of the economy and personal finances are keeping one-third of Americans from having a good night's sleep, according to a report published by the National Sleep Foundation.

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Trio of Studies Shed Light on Pediatric Asthma Issues

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Children with asthma have fewer symptoms when their exposure to air pollution is reduced, while antibiotic use is associated with an exacerbation of symptoms, according to two studies published in the March issue of Pediatrics. A third study found that pertussis vaccination is not associated with increased risk of asthma.

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