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November 2006 Briefing - Family Practice

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for November 2006. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Anticonvulsant-Sensitive Patients Can React to Tricyclics

THURSDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with carbamazepine- and phenytoin-induced anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome are at risk of having a reaction if treated with tricyclic antidepressant drugs, according to a study published in the November issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

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Young Smokers Have Higher Alcoholism Risk

THURSDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Teenagers who smoke cigarettes are more likely to abuse alcohol than non-smoking teens, researchers report in the December issue of Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

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Bee-Pollen Seen As Risky for Allergy Patients

THURSDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Although often used as an alternative medicine or food supplement, bee-pollen usage by atopic patients could be dangerous, researchers report in the November issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

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Exercise May Curb Snoring in Overweight Children

THURSDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Energetic aerobic exercise helps control snoring and general sleep-disordered breathing problems in overweight children, researchers report in the November issue of Obesity.

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Pioglitazone Benefits Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A hypocaloric diet plus pioglitazone significantly improves glucose tolerance and liver function in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, according to the results of a proof-of-concept study reported in the Nov. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Complications Studied in Abdominoplasty

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Abdominoplasty is associated with high rates of early and late complications and the need for revision surgery, according to study findings published in the November issue of the Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery.

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Cutting Smoking in Half Doesn't Impact Early Death

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing cigarette consumption by more than 50 percent does not significantly lower the risk for all-cause mortality, death due to cardiovascular disease or smoking-related cancer for men and women, according to a report in the December issue of Tobacco Control.

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FDA Issues Warning About Methadone

TUESDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a public health advisory warning to health care professionals prescribing methadone hydrochloride (Dolophine). Death and life-threatening side effects, such as severe respiratory problems and cardiac arrhythmias, have occurred in patients prescribed the drug for new pain, or who are being switched from other narcotic pain relievers.

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Smoking During Pregnancy May Impact Children's Smoking

TUESDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents whose mothers smoked during pregnancy are more likely to smoke regularly themselves and to start smoking before age 14 than children whose mothers never smoked or who smoked at other times, according to study findings published online Nov. 28 in Tobacco Control.

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Driving Errors More Frequent in Parkinson Patients

TUESDAY, Nov. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Parkinson disease make more safety errors while driving and are more than twice as likely to make errors while distracted, researchers report in the Nov. 28 issue of Neurology.

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Gallstone Risk Higher in Men Who Lose, Regain Weight

MONDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Men who go through one or more cycles of losing and regaining weight have a greater risk of developing gallstones than men who maintain a steady weight, researchers report in the Nov. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Statins for Primary Prevention Don't Reduce Mortality

MONDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Although statin therapy decreases major coronary and cerebrovascular events and revascularization procedures, it does not decrease all-cause mortality or death due to coronary heart disease in patients who do not have cardiovascular disease, according to study results published in the Nov. 27 Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Premenopausal Breast Cancer Risk Lower with High BMI

MONDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A relatively large body mass index, or BMI, in young adulthood seems to protect against premenopausal breast cancer, according to a report published in the Nov. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Low Folate Intake Not Seen As Breast Cancer Risk

MONDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a low dietary intake of folate do not have an increased risk of breast cancer compared to those with higher intakes, according to study findings published in the Nov. 15 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Heart Attack Care Substandard in Medicaid Patients

FRIDAY, Nov. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS), those on Medicaid receive lower-quality care and experience worse outcomes than those with HMOs or private insurance, according to study findings published in the Nov. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Avian Flu Clusters Found in Turkey and Indonesia

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Clusters of human H5N1 virus infection have been identified in Turkey and Indonesia, although the diagnoses in Turkey were at first difficult to make, according to two studies published in the Nov. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Four Botulism Cases Due to Unlicensed Botulinum Toxin

TUESDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Four cases of botulism occurred when a suspended clinician used an unlicensed preparation of botulinum toxin A for cosmetic purposes, with some patients receiving doses more than 40 times the estimated lethal dose in humans, according to the Nov. 22/29 issue of Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Majority of Physicians Take on Public Roles

TUESDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- About two-thirds of physicians report being actively involved in public roles related to the community, including political involvement and collective advocacy, according to study findings published in the Nov. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Parental Leave Policies Vary Across Specialty Boards

TUESDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Restrictions on how long residents can take parental-leave breaks from training and still qualify for specialty board certification are not uniform, and current policies lack the flexibility working parents need, according to a report in the November issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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DHA Levels in Older Adults May Predict Dementia Risk

TUESDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults with high plasma levels of docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA, may have a significantly lower risk of developing dementia and Alzheimer disease, according to a study in the November issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Linking Ethnicity to Diseases May Create Disparities

TUESDAY, Nov. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Linking ethnic identity to illnesses such as Tay-Sachs disease and breast cancer may exaggerate differences between ethnic groups and create disparities in testing and therapy, according to research published in the November issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

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Younger Stroke Survivors Face Health Care Barriers

MONDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Younger stroke survivors may have less access to medical care, medications and health insurance than their counterparts who are 65 and older, according to study findings published online Nov. 13 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Families Often Don't Expect Death of Elderly Relative

MONDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Families often don't recognize that death is near for an elderly relative, and black families are less likely than white families to expect a family member's death. Better communication between physicians and families could improve end-of-life care, researchers report in the November issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Hip Protectors Cost-Effective in Patients Over 80

MONDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Hip protectors prevent fractures, are cost-effective and increase quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) in women starting at age 80 and in men starting at age 85, according to a report in the November issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Brighter Light Improves Seniors' Reading Vision

MONDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Improved lighting and optimal ophthalmologic care could significantly reduce visual disability in older adults, according to a study published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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FDA Approves Breast Implants Containing Silicone Gel

FRIDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced on Friday that it will allow two companies to market silicone gel-filled breast implants for use in women 22 and older who are undergoing breast augmentation or reconstruction. The companies must perform large, post-approval studies following about 40,000 women for 10 years after implant surgery.

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Risk of Death After Falls Increasing for U.S. Elderly

FRIDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- As more Americans live longer with chronic diseases, accidental falls pose an increasing mortality risk for patients aged 65 and older, according to a report in the Nov. 17 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Alcohol Intake Increases Older Men's Bone Mineral Density

FRIDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol consumption is associated with higher bone mineral density in older men, according to a report published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. In addition, the risk of falling seems to be lower in light drinkers than abstainers, but higher in men with a history of problem drinking.

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AACR: Obesity Raises Prostate Cancer Death Risk

FRIDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Among men who develop prostate cancer, those who are obese or overweight have a higher risk of dying from the disease, according to a study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research's Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research meeting, held in Boston.

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Few Primary Care Doctors Prescribe Preventive Tamoxifen

FRIDAY, Nov. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Although tamoxifen has been approved for use as a preventive measure against breast cancer, few primary care physicians are prescribing the drug, researchers report in the Nov. 13 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Primary Care Physicians Miss Signs of Cardiac Ischemia

THURSDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care clinicians often miss early chances to send patients with cardiac ischemia to the hospital, researchers report in the Nov. 13 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. About 11 percent of acute myocardial infarction patients without a previous history of heart disease see their primary care doctor, nurse practitioner or physician's assistant for angina-like pain or other symptoms in the month before hospitalization, but aren't sent to the hospital.

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Correcting Anemia in Kidney Disease May Not Be Beneficial

THURSDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic kidney disease, fully correcting anemia may increase the risk of adverse events, according to two studies published in the Nov. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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One in Four U.S. Adults Recently Affected by Pain

THURSDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Recent and chronic pain afflict a large proportion of the U.S. adult population, according to Health, United States, 2006, a report published Nov. 15 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). One in four U.S. adults have suffered a bout of pain in the last month, and one in 10 report that the pain has lasted for at least a year.

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Lifestyle Changes Cut Type 2 Diabetes in High-Risk People

THURSDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive diet and exercise counseling can reduce disease incidence for patients at high risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, even long after counseling is discontinued, according to results from an extended follow-up the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study published in the Nov. 11 issue of The Lancet.

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Midlife Self-Care Extends Men's Life Span into 80s, 90s

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged men who avoid common risk factors for chronic disease have a better chance of achieving an "exceptional" survival, defined as living to age 85 and beyond without physical or mental impairment, according to a study published in the Nov. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Lipid-Producing Gene Marked as Regulator of Hair Growth

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have identified the phospholipase gene LIPH as an important regulator of hair growth, according to a report in the Nov. 10 issue of Science. The gene regulates the production of bioactive lipids and may be a new therapeutic target for hair loss.

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Caregiver Support Delays Nursing Home for Alzheimer's

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Caregiver counseling can help keep Alzheimer disease patients home for a longer period of time and delay the need for nursing home placement, according to a report in the November issue of Neurology.

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ACR: Lifetime Risk of Osteoarthritis is 24 Percent

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Almost one in four people who live to the age of 85 will develop osteoarthritis, and the risk for those who are obese is more than one in three, according to a paper presented at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting held Nov. 10-15 in Washington, D.C.

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Inherited Metabolic Disorders Affect 800 Annually in U.K.

TUESDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In the United Kingdom, there are approximately 800 new cases a year of inherited metabolic disorders (IMD) -- substantially more than previously recorded -- covering a wide range of conditions, according to a study published in the November issue of the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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AACR: Pancreatic Cancer Linked to Gum Disease

TUESDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Periodontal disease may raise the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, according to a study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research's Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research meeting, held in Boston.

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Efficacy of Ovarian Ablation and Chemotherapy Compared

FRIDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In premenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, ovarian ablation has a similar effect to chemotherapy on disease-free and overall survival, researchers report in the Nov. 1 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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High Cardiac Troponin T Linked to Reduced Survival

FRIDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated levels of cardiac troponin T following percutaneous coronary intervention is associated with reduced survival in patients with normal creatine kinase levels, according to the results of a study published in the Nov. 7 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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PET Imaging of Carotid Plaques Detects Inflammation

FRIDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with fluorodeoxyglucose, whose uptake has been shown to be increased in carotid plaques, is an effective and non-invasive way to assess inflammation in patients with severe carotid stenoses, researchers report in the Nov. 7 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Lifestyle History Affects Men's Cancer Survival

FRIDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In men newly diagnosed with cancer, overall survival is significantly affected by a history of smoking, heavy alcohol consumption or insulin resistance, but not by a history of obesity, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Periorificial Dermatitis Strikes Children of All Ages

FRIDAY, Nov. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Periorificial dermatitis affects children and adolescents of all ages and may be associated with topical steroid use, according to the findings of a retrospective chart review published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Delayed Treatment May Be Better for Trauma Victims

THURSDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Delayed treatment intervention might be more effective than early treatment for suppressing fearful memories after a traumatic event, according to the results of a study of rats published online Nov. 7 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

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Heavy Smoking May Hinder Uterine Receptiveness

THURSDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smoking may make the uterus less receptive to implantation, according to a report published online Nov. 9 in Human Reproduction.

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Deep-Brain Stimulation Studied in Dystonia

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with primary generalized or segmental dystonia, bilateral pallidal deep-brain stimulation is more effective than sham stimulation, according to a study published in the Nov. 9 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Chloroquine Returns as Anti-Malarial Drug in Malawi

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The anti-malarial drug chloroquine, withdrawn by Malawi in 1993 because of declining efficacy, may once again be an effective treatment, according to study findings published in the Nov. 9 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Ob/Gyn Residents Report High Rate of Burnout, Depression

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Although established obstetrician/gynecologists are equally satisfied in academic or private practices, residents report a high rate of burnout and depression, according to two studies in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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White Curtains Boost Neonatal Jaundice Phototherapy

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of white reflecting curtains to a neonatal phototherapy unit increases the efficacy of the treatment for neonatal jaundice with no side effects and at low cost, according to a study published in the November issue of the Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition.

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Persistent Dermatitis Related to Egg Sensitivity

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- While most children eventually outgrow atopic dermatitis, children with an early sensitivity to eggs are more likely to have persistent atopic dermatitis than those with other types of allergy, researchers report in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. What's more, such children are also at greater risk of developing asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis by adolescence or young adulthood.

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Transplanted Rod Precursor Cells Repair Retina in Mice

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Non-dividing rod precursor cells can regenerate new photoreceptor cells when implanted into the adult mouse retina, according to a report in the Nov. 9 issue of Nature. The results suggest a way to regenerate photoreceptors lost from multiple forms of blindness.

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Religion May Have Positive Impact on Schizophrenia Care

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients with psychotic illnesses report that religion significantly improves their care, although about 14 percent of patients say it causes spiritual despair, according to a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Pregnancy Complications Likely After Fibroid Treatment

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have undergone uterine artery embolization to treat fibroids have a significantly higher risk of delivery by Caesarean section as well as an increase in preterm delivery, postpartum hemorrhage, miscarriage and lower pregnancy rates compared to the general obstetric population, according to study findings published in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Prolonged Bottle-Feeding May Lead to Iron Depletion

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Daytime bottle-feeding in the second and third years of life may be a risk factor for iron depletion, according to a study published in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Malaria Prevention Strategies Should Be Individualized

TUESDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Until a consensus on guidelines is reached, individually tailored strategies are needed to help prevent malaria among long-term travelers, according to a literature review published in the Nov. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Poison Control Centers Can Prevent Hospitalizations

TUESDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Calls to poison control centers can prevent hospitalizations for poisoning in rural areas, with an estimated 43.3 calls preventing one hospitalization and saving a net $7,321, researchers report in the November issue of Pediatrics.

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Left Main Coronary Artery Narrowing More Likely in Men

TUESDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who undergo coronary angiography, men are more likely than women to have left main coronary artery significant stenosis (LMSS) and at a younger age, according to a study in the November issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Fewer Men Going Into Obstetrics and Gynecology

TUESDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of men entering general obstetrics and gynecology practice in New York State sharply declined over a five-year period, researchers report in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Rate of Non-Fatal School Bus Injuries Higher Than Thought

TUESDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- More children are involved in non-fatal school bus-related injuries each year than previously reported, according to study findings published in the November issue of Pediatrics.

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Anabolic Steroids Linked to Criminal Activity

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Use of anabolic androgenic steroids may be associated with an increased risk for criminal activity, according to a report in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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U.S. Adults Favor Balanced Sex Education Programs

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- American adults of all political stripes support comprehensive sex education programs that teach children about abstinence and other ways to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, according to a study published in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Stress, Trauma Linked to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Stress or traumatic events experienced early in life can contribute to the development of chronic fatigue syndrome as an adult, according to two studies in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Obesity at Age 10 Linked to Earlier Puberty in Boys

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index (BMI) in 10-year-old boys is a significant predictor of age at puberty, with each unit increase in BMI linked to a 6-week reduction in the age of peak height velocity, researchers report in the November issue of Diabetes. In addition, an early puberty is associated with a central fat distribution in young adulthood.

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Iron-Deficient Infants Have Persistent Cognitive Deficit

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Infants who are iron deficient have lower cognitive test scores than those with sufficient iron levels, and the gap persists into the teenage years, especially for children at lower socioeconomic levels, according to a report published in the November issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Electric Stimulation of Brain During Sleep Boosts Memory

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The application of a weak electrical current to the brain during sleep can improve memory, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in Nature. The findings show that brain activity during stage 2 non-rapid eye movement (REM) sleep plays a key role in consolidating new memories.

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Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Restaurant Tomatoes

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Investigators from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and affected states found that the recent outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium that sickened 183 people in 21 states was caused by consumption of tomatoes in restaurants, according to a statement by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Gender Difference Seen in Acute Coronary Syndrome

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acute coronary syndrome, men are more likely to present with excessive sweating, or diaphoresis, while women are more likely to present with nausea, according to the results of a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Study Finds U.S. Children Watch Too Much TV

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Children are watching more television than the two hours a day maximum currently recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, according to a report in the November issue of Pediatrics. The average child in the study watched three hours of TV a day and households had an average of four TV sets, often in the kitchen, dining room or child's bedroom.

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Hot Air Cures Head Lice Infestation

MONDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Hot air seems to be a safe and effective treatment for head lice, and one method of heat application was 100 percent effective at curing lice infestation after a single 30-minute treatment, according to a report in the November issue of Pediatrics.

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Combination Therapy Effective Against Ovarian Cancer

FRIDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In an animal model of ovarian cancer, a combination treatment including EA5, an antibody to a protein expressed by ovarian cancer cells, and paclitaxel can substantially decrease cancer growth compared to either treatment alone, researchers report in the Nov. 1 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Weight Loss in Older Women Linked to Lower Bone Density

FRIDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Women who lose weight during the peri- and postmenopausal years are more likely to lose bone mineral density than women who gain weight, researchers report in the November issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

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Methamphetamine Abusers Respond to Reward System

FRIDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A contingency management program that rewards methamphetamine-dependent participants with prizes for remaining drug-free helps them stay off drugs longer than regular treatment alone, researchers report in the November issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Year Supply of Oral Contraceptives Encourages Use

FRIDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Dispensing a year's supply of oral contraceptive pills promotes continuation of use and also reduces costs compared to dispensing fewer cycles at a time, researchers report in the Nov. 1 issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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FDA Issues Guidelines for Rhinosinusitis Research

FRIDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued the first set of guidelines for researchers conducting clinical trials of chronic rhinosinusitis treatments. "Rhinosinusitis: Developing Guidance for Clinical Trials" will be published in a November supplement of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and in Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery.

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Physical Activity Improves Glucose Tolerance in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Women who engage in vigorous physical activity before pregnancy and at least light-to-moderate activity during pregnancy are the least likely to develop gestational diabetes mellitus, suggesting a link between physical activity and glucose tolerance, according to a study published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Teenagers' Attitudes About Sex Similar Worldwide

FRIDAY, Nov. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Safe-sex programs aimed at young people must take into account social factors and teenagers' attitudes if they are to succeed, according to a study published in the Nov. 4 issue of The Lancet. The study found strong similarities between the factors that affect the sexual behavior of teens in different countries.

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Lower Body Temperature May Extend Life Span

THURSDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found that mice with a core temperature one-half a degree Celsius lower than normal live about 15 percent longer than mice with a normal body core temperature, according to a report in the Nov. 3 issue of Science.

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Radiation Therapy Affects Childhood Cancer Survivors

THURSDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood cancer survivors who were treated with radiation may face an increased risk of brain and spinal column tumors, according to a report in the Nov. 1 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Tall Patients Have Higher Risk of Peripheral Neuropathy

THURSDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetics are twice as likely as non-diabetics to develop peripheral insensate neuropathy, and patients who are tall have an additional risk regardless of whether or not they have diabetes, according to a study in the November issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

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NEJM Retracts Two Oral Cancer Studies

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has retracted two studies on oral cancer because the supporting data is believed to be fabricated, according to an editorial in the Nov. 2 issue of the journal.

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Preterm Birth Unaffected by Periodontitis Treatment

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of preterm birth are not significantly lower in pregnant women with gum disease who are treated for periodontitis compared to women with gum disease who are not treated, according to a study published in the Nov. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Commercial HMOs Embrace Pay-for-Performance Programs

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Pay-for-performance programs are now used by a majority of commercial health maintenance organizations, according to a special report published in the Nov. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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One-Third of Those Over 65 Have Dementia When They Die

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Thirty percent of people aged 65 and older in England and Wales have dementia before death, researchers report in the October issue of PLoS-Medicine.

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PSA Velocity Predicts Prostate Cancer Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) velocity, the rate at which PSA increases or decreases, predicts survival in men who later develop prostate cancer, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Women Negative for Breast Cancer Mutation Still at Risk

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Female relatives of women with mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 still have a threefold increased risk of developing breast or ovarian cancer even if they lack mutations in either gene, according to a report published online Oct. 31 in the Journal of Medical Genetics.

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Iron Supplements May Decrease Risk of Infertility

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Ovulatory infertility may be less likely in women who take iron supplements or consume high amounts of non-heme iron from other sources, according to study findings published in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Acupuncture May Benefit Osteoarthritis Patients

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or hip, acupuncture in addition to routine care may result in significant clinical improvement, researchers report in the November issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Study Highlights Diversity in Sexual Behavior Across Globe

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to popular belief, there is not a trend toward earlier sexual intercourse across the globe, according to the results of a new study of sexual behavior in 59 countries that appears in a special online issue of The Lancet.

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Turmeric Seen as Potential Rheumatoid Arthritis Therapy

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- A turmeric extract may improve symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis through an identifiable mechanism, according to the results of an animal study published in the November issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Gene Linked to Greater Tolerance of Pain

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The GTP cyclohydrolase gene, GCH1, is an essential component in neurotransmitter production and may also be a key modulator of pain sensitivity, according to a report in the Oct. 22 advance online edition of Nature Medicine. Individuals carrying particular variants of GCH1 seem to be more tolerant of acute pain.

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