See What HealthDay Can Do For You
Contact Us

October 2010 Briefing - Family Practice

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for October 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

FDA: Methotrexate Injection Vials Recalled

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Sandoz have notified health care professionals of a voluntary recall of 24 lots of methotrexate injection (50 mg/2 mL and 250 mg/10 mL vials) due to the presence of small glass particulates in a limited number of vials in four lots.

More Information

CDC Warns Travelers of Cholera Outbreak in Haiti

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has warned those traveling to Haiti to celebrate All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day to take precautions to protect themselves from cholera.

More Information

BPA Exposure Associated With Poorer Semen Quality

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to bisphenol-A (BPA) -- a component of many consumer products, including plastic containers and liners of food and beverage cans -- may have an adverse effect on semen quality, according to research published online Oct. 29 in Fertility and Sterility.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pneumonia Vaccination Rate Has Increased in Older Adults

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The number of elderly Americans who get vaccinated against pneumonia has increased, but the proportion is still less than 60 percent, and disparities exist among ethnic and racial groups, according to the 2009 National Healthcare Disparities Report, published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

More Information

Many Factors Found to Predict Hospital Readmission

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to having a chronic disease, many factors, including race, type of payer, depressive symptoms, and even body mass index (BMI), increase the risk of hospital readmission, according to research published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Abstract - Allaudeen
Full Text
Abstract - Mudge
Full Text

Associations Found Between ADHD and Adulthood BMI

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who report symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at risk for obesity in adulthood, according to research published online Oct. 26 in the International Journal of Obesity.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Sodium Intake in U.S. Adults Not Seen to Fall Over Time

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Based on data dating back to the 1950s, sodium intake among adults in the United States appears to exceed recommended intakes, with no evident decrease over time, according to research published in the November issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

NFL Management of Concussion More Conservative Since 2002

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The most recent six years of National Football League (NFL) concussion data, published online Oct. 1 in Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach, shows only a slight decline in the incidence of concussions but documents more conservative management by team doctors in their return-to-play recommendations.

Abstract
Full Text

Green Tea Does Not Prevent Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Although animal and in vitro studies have shown green tea to be protective against breast cancer, a large prospective trial in Japan has found no such benefit; the findings have been published online Oct. 28 in Breast Cancer Research.

Abstract
Full Text

Left Arm Splints Significantly Degrade Driving

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Immobilization of a limb does not prevent many people from driving, but wearing an arm splint appears to have a detrimental effect on this skill, according to research published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Video, TV, Gamer Violence Desensitizes Teenage Boys

FRIDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent boys who watch violent movies or television programs or play violent video games may become desensitized to aggression, which could promote aggressive attitudes and behaviors, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience.

Abstract
Full Text

CDC: Second Dose of Meningitis Vaccine Recommended

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices panel has recommended that 16-year-olds get a meningitis booster shot, as the vaccine does not appear to last as long as previously thought.

More Information

CDC: Whooping Cough Vaccine Recommended for Elderly

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has recommended that adults aged 65 years and older who are in close contact with infants be vaccinated against whooping cough.

More Information

Removing Deductible Affects Use of Preventive Screenings

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Among healthy individuals, the use of first-dollar coverage -- also known as zero-deductible coverage -- may modestly improve utilization of preventive services, especially in people in low-deductible plans, according to research published online Oct. 28 in Health Services Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Coffee, Tea Consumption Linked to Lower Glioma Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Coffee and tea consumption is associated with a lower risk of glioma, according to research published in the November issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

For Coronary Patients, H2RA Plus Clopidogrel Spikes Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The concomitant use of a histamine2-receptor antagonist (H2RA) and clopidogrel for patients with prior acute coronary syndrome (ACS) more than doubles the risk of rehospitalization or death compared to treatment with clopidogrel only, according to research published in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

n-3 Fatty Acids May Protect Against Periodontitis

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as those found in fish oils, may be effective for preventing and treating periodontitis, according to research published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Radiation-Induced Cancers Still a Threat in Middle Age

THURSDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- While standard models and epidemiological data have suggested that radiation-related cancer risks are higher in children and decrease with increasing age at exposure, mathematical models do not support this for all cancer types, according to research published online Oct. 25 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Air Pollution Associated With Diabetes Prevalence

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution may be one factor explaining the dramatic rise in diabetes prevalence over the past few decades, according to research published in the October issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text

Red Yeast Rice Supplements Lacking Standardization

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Red yeast rice, a popular dietary supplement for reducing cholesterol, contains widely differing concentrations of monacolins, the active ingredients, by brand, and some contain a potentially toxic substance, according to research published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lifestyle Score, Decision Aid Affect Colon Cancer Prevention

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Each additional healthy lifestyle behavior can decrease colorectal cancer risk by 11 percent, according to research published online Oct. 26 in BMJ. In another article in the same issue, a decision aid to help adults with low education levels make informed colorectal cancer screening decisions appears to cause more patients to avoid the screening entirely.

Abstract - Kirkegaard
Full Text
Abstract - Smith
Full Text
Editorial

Opioid Substitution Rx Lowers Mortality Risk for Abusers

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Despite increased risk during the first two weeks, the risk of death during opioid substitution therapy is lower, overall, than the risk of death out of treatment, according to research published online Oct. 26 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

IUD Expulsion Risk Greater With Postpartum Insertion

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who have a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (IUD) inserted immediately after delivery are much more likely to expel the device in the months after delivery than women who delay insertion, but IUD use six months after delivery is similar in the two groups, according to a study in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Majority of Infants Sleep Through the Night at 5 Months

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A set of criteria can be used by pediatricians to reassure new parents that their infant is likely to sleep through the night -- on the parents' sleep schedule -- by the age of 5 months, according to research published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Probe-to-Bone Best Test for Diabetic Foot Osteomyelitis

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The best and most efficient test for diagnosing chronic osteomyelitis of the foot in patients with diabetes may be the probe-to-bone (PTB) test, according to research published in the October issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text

Smoking in Midlife Linked to Later Dementia Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who smoke heavily in midlife appear to have a higher risk of dementia -- including Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia -- decades later, according to research published online Oct. 25 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Primary Care Trails Other Specialties in Hourly Wages

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians have substantially lower hourly wages than other specialists, and although most physicians find Medicare reimbursement inequitable, they show little consensus on how to reform it, according to two studies published in the Oct. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Leigh
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Federman
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Barbershop Program Linked to Blood Pressure Benefits

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A program in which barbers with predominantly African-American clients conduct blood pressure monitoring and referral may improve hypertension control among black men, according to research published online Oct. 25 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Colorectal Screening Strategy for Minority Women Tested

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Offering colorectal cancer screening (CRCS) to low-income minority women during mammography visits can be an effective way to increase screening in this population, but a lack of medical insurance remains an important barrier for many women, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

New Bivalent Poliovirus Vaccine Appears Effective

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A novel bivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (bOPV) against poliovirus types 1 and 3 appears to be superior to trivalent OPV (tOPV) and non-inferior to monovalent type 1 OPV (mOPV1) and mOPV3, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Teens With Both-Sex Partners Engage in Risky Behaviors

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 sexually active adolescents reports a same-sex partner, and those who have partners of both sexes report behaviors that put them at risk for sexually transmitted infections, according to research published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

H1N1 Pandemic in 2010/2011 Season Unlikely

TUESDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers analyzing H1N1 antibody levels after the 2009 pandemic have determined that a third wave in 2010 is unlikely, though people aged 50 to 79 may be more vulnerable; their findings, which support shifting vaccination prioritization from young people to older people, have been published online Oct. 18 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

HealthGrades: Lower Mortality Seen at High-Ranked Hospitals

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patients at hospitals performing better than average on a variety of procedures and diagnoses have a lower risk of mortality compared to patients at low-performing hospitals, according to research released Oct. 20 by HealthGrades.

More Information

Autism Prevalence Rising Rapidly in Some Schools

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In Wisconsin, the number of children with autism is increasing in school districts with low baseline prevalence, while other school districts are seeing a leveling off in their numbers, according to research published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Strength Training Generally Effective in Children

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Resistance training can lead to significantly increased muscular strength in children, but the biggest effect is seen in those who are more physically mature, train longer, and perform more sets, according to research published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Children Comprise Two-Thirds of ER Visits for Drug Ingestion

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Children under the age of 5 made up two-thirds of emergency department visits for accidental ingestion of drugs in 2008, according to a new report issued by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

More Information

Vaccination Rate Down in Privately-Insured Children

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccination rates among children with private health insurance have decreased -- possibly because of unproven fears that vaccines cause autism -- and rates among children with Medicaid have increased, according to the new State of Health Care Quality report released by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA).

More Information

High-Risk Teens, Parents Underreport Illicit Drug Use

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Self-reports of illicit drug use by high-risk teens and reports of teen drug use by parents are substantially lower than actual drug use as determined objectively by analysis of hair samples, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Elective Bilateral Salpingo-Oophorectomy Has Decreased

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of women electing to undergo bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy has dropped significantly since 2002 after increasing in prior years, though the risks versus the benefits have not been clearly established, according to a study in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pediatric Hospitalizations for ATV Injuries on the Rise

MONDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Since the first four-wheeled all-terrain vehicle (ATV) debuted in the mid-1980s, pediatric injuries and deaths related to the use of ATVs have increased notably, more than doubling between 1997 and 2006, according to research published online October 18 in the Journal of Trauma: Injury, Infection, and Critical Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cortisone May Help Tennis Elbow in Short Term

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Cortisone injections may provide better short-term relief from tennis elbow than other treatments, but the results don't last beyond three to six weeks, according to research published online Oct. 22 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

U.S. Diabetes Prevalence Expected to Skyrocket

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- By 2050, as many as one in three U.S. adults are expected to have diabetes if current trends continue, according to a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report published Oct. 22 in Population Health Metrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Low-Dose Aspirin Can Reduce Colorectal Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term, low-dose aspirin intake may reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) by nearly a quarter, and the risk of death from CRC by more than a third, according to research published online Oct. 22 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Bacteriuria Unrelated to Painful Bladder Syndrome Flares

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Episodes of bacteria in the urine (bacteriuria) do not seem to be related to symptoms of painful bladder syndrome (PBS) in women with interstitial cystitis (IC), according to a study in the October issue of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Update on Iron Deficiency in Infants and Toddlers Issued

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have updated a policy statement on diagnosing and preventing iron deficiency (ID) and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) in children up to age 3 based on data from an extensive literature review; their report has been published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Low Testosterone Linked With CVD-Related Mortality

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests a link between low testosterone levels and increased risk of death in men who have heart disease, according to a report published online Oct. 19 in Heart.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Eye Damage Seen in Anorexia Nervosa

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Anorexia nervosa (AN) may cause serious eye damage, even without noticeable vision loss, according to research published online Oct. 19 in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

New Guidelines for Recurrent Stroke Prevention Published

FRIDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A joint committee representing the American Heart Association and the American Stroke Association has published updated evidence-based recommendations on the prevention of ischemic stroke among survivors of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack; the statement has been published online Oct. 21 in Stroke.

Abstract
Full Text

Season of First Trimester Associated With Food Allergy

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Children who were at about 11 weeks gestational age during springtime allergy season may be at increased risk for sensitivity to food allergies, according to research published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

HIV Drug Invirase Gets New Label Reflecting Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- New risk information has been added to the label of the HIV antiviral drug Invirase (saquinavir), notifying patients and health care professionals that the drug can have potentially life-threatening adverse effects when used in combination with another antiviral drug, according to an announcement by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Press Release
More Information

Educational Campaigns May Improve Skin Cancer Screening

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Educational campaigns that include specific recommendations for who should be screened for skin cancer may improve skin cancer screening rates and increase the understanding of screening benefits, according to a study published Oct. 18 in the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Ankle-Brachial Index Linked to Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Having a low or high ankle-brachial index (ABI) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to research published in the Oct. 26 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Infusion Ups Risk of Organ Failure in Trauma Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Early transfusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is associated with an increased risk of post-injury multiple organ failure (MOF), according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Psychiatric Comorbidity Ups 30-Day Surgical Mortality

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical patients with a preexisting psychiatric comorbidity have a greater 30-day post-surgical mortality risk, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Neuro/Endothelial Effects of Sleep Apnea Coexist in Children

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive dysfunction and endothelial dysfunction usually coexist in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), raising the possibility of using the simple measurement of microvascular postischemic reperfusion of the forearm as a screen for cognitive defects as well, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Children With Food Allergies May Face More Bullying

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Children and teens with food allergies are at increased risk of bullying and harassment, according to a report published in the October issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Most PCPs Not Following Colorectal Screening Guidelines

THURSDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than one-fifth of primary care physicians (PCPs) comply with practice guidelines for colorectal cancer (CRC) screening, according to the results of a National Cancer Institute survey published online Oct. 14 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Magnetic Therapy Shows Lasting Benefit in Major Depression

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a noninvasive, non-drug therapy that has been shown to be successful for acute relief of depressive symptoms, appears to have durable long-term benefits as well, according to research published in the October issue of Brain Stimulation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Weekly INR Self-Testing Not Superior to Monthly Clinic Tests

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients using warfarin, self-testing of international normalized ratio (INR) doesn't appear superior to clinic testing for reducing the risk of adverse outcomes, including major bleeding and stroke, according to research published in the Oct. 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Alcohol, Marijuana Use Linked to Youths' Cognitive Problems

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Heavy alcohol consumption, as well as marijuana use, appears to affect cognitive development in adolescents, according to research published online Oct. 19 in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pneumococcal Meningitis Remains Cause of Deafness

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Although pneumococcal vaccination has reduced invasive disease, pneumococcal meningitis as a cause of deafness among children has not been eliminated, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pradaxa Approved for Atrial Fibrillation

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Pradaxa (dabigatran etexilate) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to help prevent stroke in people with a type of abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation.

atrial fibrillation

Corticosteroids Decrease Recurrent A-Fib After Ablation

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The short-term use of corticosteroids following atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation may safely prevent AF recurrences both immediately after pulmonary vein isolation and over longer follow-up, according to research published in the Oct. 26 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Risk of Restless Legs Found Higher in Fibromyalgia Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with fibromyalgia appear to have a substantially higher risk of restless legs syndrome (RLS), according to research published in the Oct. 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cardiorespiratory Fitness Linked to Cardiac Death Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Although better cardiorespiratory fitness reduces the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in middle-aged and older men, adding this risk factor to a conventional risk-prediction model only modestly improves SCD prediction, according to research published in the Oct. 26 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician Assistant, Nurse Roles in Pediatric Care Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- With a shortage of pediatric physicians looming, nurse practitioners and physician assistants may increasingly be called on to deliver pediatric care, but these health care providers may lack the numbers and experience to fill the breach, according to a series of reports published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - FNP Study
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - PNP Study
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - PPA Study
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hospital Compare Web Site May Offer Limited Patient Guidance

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The use of information available on the Hospital Compare Web site doesn't help patients find hospitals that have better outcomes for high-risk surgeries, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Spinal Fractures Spotlighted During World Osteoporosis Day

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Spinal fractures worldwide occur at an estimated rate of one every 22 seconds, and health care professionals need to be able to recognize the signs of these fractures in their patients, according to the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) report, The Breaking Spine.

Full Text

More Node+ Breast Cancer, Higher Mortality After HRT

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal estrogen-plus-progestin therapy not only results in an increased incidence of invasive breast cancers but also in more node-positive cancers and an increased mortality rate, according to an analysis published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

DHA Supplements Don't Prevent Postpartum Depression

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The results of the large, multicenter DOMInO (DHA to Optimize Mother Infant Outcome) trial do not support routine docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation for pregnant women to reduce depressive symptoms or to improve cognitive or language outcomes in early childhood, according to research published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Titrated Oxygen Linked to Reduced Mortality in COPD

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the use of titrated oxygen -- compared to routine high-flow oxygen -- in the prehospital setting is associated with reduced mortality, according to research published online Oct. 19 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Vitamin D Levels Lower in Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS), many of whom routinely protect themselves from the sun due to higher risk of skin cancer, appear to be at increased risk of vitamin D deficiency, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medicaid Reimbursement Rate Affects Flu Shots for Children

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Higher Medicaid reimbursement rates for influenza vaccine administration are associated with an increase in the number of low-income level children who will receive one, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Invasive Dental Procedures May Up Vascular Event Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Whether due to inflammatory effects or to a brief cessation of daily aspirin or other antiplatelet therapy, invasive dental treatments appear to be associated with a transient increased risk of a vascular event, particularly in the first four weeks after surgery, according to research published in the Oct. 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Very Few Clinical Trials Report Composition of Placebo Drug

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The composition of placebos used in clinical trials -- including pills, injectables, and other substances -- are not regulated and rarely reported, which may ultimately compromise the integrity of clinical research, according to a study in the Oct. 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Reciprocal Peer Support Promising for Diabetes Care

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to a nurse care management (NCM) system, one-to-one reciprocal peer support (RPS) results in greater improvements in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) for patients with diabetes, according to research published in the Oct. 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Seeks Factors in 'Never-Event' Medical Errors

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Wrong-patient and wrong-site procedures -- which are surgical "never events" -- may be continuing at a high frequency, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

New CPR Guidelines Emphasize Chest Compression First

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Lay and professional rescuers using cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to revive someone stricken by cardiac arrest should begin chest compressions first to quickly restore blood circulation, rather than risk the delay to clear the patient's airway and restart breathing, according to the "2010 American Heart Association (AHA) Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care," published online Oct. 18 in Circulation.

Abstract
Full Text
More Information

Homocysteine, B12 Associated With Alzheimer's Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Serum levels of homocysteine (tHcy) and holotranscobalamin (holoTC) -- the active form of vitamin B12 -- may be useful in determining the risk of, and preventing, Alzheimer's disease (AD), with higher holoTC levels being a protective factor, according to research published in the Oct. 19 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Researchers Identify Most Common HPV Types

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Eight types of human papillomavirus (HPV) appear to be responsible for over 90 percent of the world's cervical cancer cases; researchers recommend these eight types be the target for future vaccines and that the three most common high-risk HPV types -- 16, 18, and 45 -- which occur in younger women, should be the focus of type-specific HPV screening. Their findings have been published online Oct. 18 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Soy Lowers Recurrence Rate in Some Types of Breast Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Although concerns have been raised in recent years about the potential adverse effect of soy consumption on estrogen- and progesterone-receptor positive breast cancers, new research has shown a lower risk for recurrence of these cancers for women who consume high amounts of soy isoflavones; the study has been published online Oct. 18 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Offspring of Maternal Suicides at Risk for Suicide Attempt

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Children who lose a mother to suicide appear to be at increased risk for suicide attempt-related hospitalization compared with children who lose a mother to a fatal accident, but this association doesn't hold for children who lose a father to suicide, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC Compares Accuracy of Fever Screening Systems

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Two of three infrared thermal detection systems (ITDS) tested by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reliably distinguish people with and without fever better than individual self reports, according to research published in the November issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Full Text

FDA Approves Botox for Chronic Migraine Treatment

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- On Friday, Oct. 15, 2010, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the approval of onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox) injection for the prevention of headaches in adult patients with chronic migraines.

More Information

Bed Sharing Linked to Higher Rate of Breast-Feeding

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The potential hazard of bed sharing with infants has led many professionals to recommend against it, but researchers who have found a relationship between bed sharing and breast-feeding suggest this relationship be taken into account; their findings have been published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hypertensive Black Children at Higher Risk Than Non-Blacks

MONDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- African-American children with primary hypertension have clinical characteristics that place them at higher risk of developing heart disease than non-African-American children, according to research published online Oct. 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Coronary Artery Calcium Aids Risk Classification in Elderly

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery calcium (CAC) levels can be used to fine-tune coronary heart disease (CHD) risk assessment in elderly people with no disease symptoms, according to a study in the Oct. 19 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Epidemiology of Multiple-, Single-Child Autism Described

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Though some families have a single child with autism spectrum disorder, other families have multiple autistic children or otherwise normal children with some autistic traits, suggesting differing genetic bases for the condition, according to a study published Oct. 1 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Issues Warnings About Unapproved "Chelation" Drugs

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care professionals and consumers that no evidence has proved that nonprescription "chelation" products actually rid the body of toxic metals and can treat a variety of serious conditions and diseases.

More Information

Individual BP Goal May Affect Mortality for Dialysis Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients on hemodialysis, age, race, and diabetes status may affect the relationship between blood pressure and mortality, according to research published online Oct. 14 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Experimental HCV Drug Combination Shows Potential

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental oral drug combination appears to be well-tolerated and safe, showing promising antiviral activity for the treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

"Natural" Weight Loss Products Pose Danger

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- An examination of poisoning cases in Hong Kong linked to over-the-counter (OTC) weight loss products often advertised to contain only "natural" ingredients" revealed the products to be laced with multiple illicit ingredients with toxicities that can cause illness or even death, according to a report published online Oct. 13 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

Abstract
Full Text

Rates of Recommended Tdap Vaccination Low

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Use of tetanus vaccine changed little between 1999 and 2008, and uptake of licensed tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine has been low, according to research published in the Oct. 15 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Expectations Don't Predict Recovery Time for All Injuries

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Recovery expectations appear to predict future recovery among workers filing injury claims for back pain but not for those filing claims for other musculoskeletal conditions, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Chest-Compression-Only CPR Should Be Recommended

FRIDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Chest-compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) should be recommended by emergency medical services to bystanders caring for individuals experiencing out-of-hospital cardiac arrest rather than standard CPR with mouth-to-mouth, according to research published online Oct. 15 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bioavailable Testosterone Linked to Lower Alzheimer's Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of bioavailable testosterone may be protective against Alzheimer's disease in older men, according to research published online Aug. 6 in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pattern of MRI Findings Predicts Cognitive Decline

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have more cerebral microhemorrhages and an altered iron distribution on magnetic resonance imaging compared with controls, and analysis using a support vector machine (SVM) may identify patients with MCI at higher risk of cognitive decline, according to research published online Oct. 5 in Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Diabetes Hospitalizations Rise Among Young Adults

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalizations associated with diabetes have significantly increased among young adults, in particular young women, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Women's Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Fibromyalgia Sufferers May Benefit From Yoga Practice

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga might provide an effective counterpart to pharmacotherapy in helping patients cope with and manage fibromyalgia, according to research published in the November issue of Pain.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Sex Practices Driving Surge in HPV-Linked Oral Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Changing sexual practices, including increased oral sex, multiple sex partners, and an early start of sexual activity, are behind an epidemic of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) linked to sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), according to an article in the November issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

Full Text

Disabled, Ill Youths at Higher Risk of Being Bullied

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents with disabilities or chronic illness appear more likely to be bullied, with certain social and family factors affecting their risk, according to research published online Oct. 8 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Online Screening for Cancer-Related Distress Feasible

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Online screening for distress in cancer patients is feasible and effective, according to research published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

In Elderly, Algorithm Helps Reduce Number of Medications

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A tool known as the Good Palliative-Geriatric Practice algorithm can help safely reduce the use of medications in community-dwelling elderly individuals, according to research published in the Oct. 11 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Mass Media Likely Tied to Health Risks in Children

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Media education may reduce harmful effects associated with mass media exposure among children and adolescents and promote beneficial outcomes, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics published in the November issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Long-Distance Walking Ups Gray Matter Volume

THURSDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, more physical activity is associated with greater gray matter volume years later, which in turn is linked to a lower risk of cognitive impairment, according to research published online Oct. 13 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bisphosphonate Users at Possible Risk of Thigh Fracture

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphosphonates may put users at risk for atypical thigh bone fractures, according to a warning to health care providers and patients issued Oct. 13 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; the risk will be reflected in a labeling change and Medication Guide.

More Information

IOM: Front-of-Package Nutrition Labels Need New Focus

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Front-of-package (FOP) nutrition labeling would be most helpful to consumers if it clearly highlighted the information of greatest concern -- calories, saturated fat, trans fat, and sodium -- according to the findings of an Institute of Medicine committee review released Oct. 13.

Full Text

CDC: In U.S., Hispanics Outlive General Population

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanic individuals in the United States live an average 2.5 years longer than non-Hispanic white individuals and 7.7 years longer than non-Hispanic black individuals, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report United States Life Tables by Hispanic Origin, 2006, which was released today.

Full Text

Bisphosphonates Up Risk of A-Fib in Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Older cancer patients who receive intravenous bisphosphonate therapy may be at a modestly increased risk for atrial fibrillation, supraventricular tachycardia (SVT), and stroke, according to research published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Prior Aspirin Use Is Marker for Recurrent MI Risk After ACS

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with a history of aspirin use who experience an incident of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are at modestly higher risk of recurrent myocardial infarction (MI), but not mortality, compared with non-prior aspirin users, according to a study in the Oct. 19 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Buprenorphine Implants Effective in Opioid Dependence

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Implanted buprenorphine is an effective alternative for treatment of opioid dependency, resulting in fewer withdrawal symptoms and less treatment drop-out than placebo implants, according to research published in the Oct. 13 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Advanced Cancer Patients Still Getting Cancer Screenings

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with advanced cancer continue to undergo common cancer screening tests that are unlikely to provide benefit because of their shortened life expectancy, according to research published in the Oct. 13 issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Midwife Training Programs Cut Neonatal Deaths in Zambia

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Two midwife training programs significantly decreased the seven-day neonatal death rate in community health clinics in Zambia, according to research published online Oct. 11 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Limited Screen Time Best Even for Active Children

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Watching TV or using a computer for more than two hours each day increases a child's risk of psychological difficulties, and the risk is even higher if the child is not physically active, according to research published online Oct. 11 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Neonatal Jaundice Ups Risk of Infantile Autism

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Neonatal jaundice appears to increase the risk of autism and other psychological development disorders, but only for a subset of term infants, according to research published online Oct. 11 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

New White Paper Issued on Ovarian Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The Society of Gynecologic Oncologists (SGO) has issued a comprehensive white paper -- as part the organization's professional GynecoLogic Cancer Collaborative education program -- that provides an overview of and background on the screening, diagnosis, and management of ovarian cancer. The report is published in the October issue of Gynecologic Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

New Method Shows Promise for Detecting Lung Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The use of partial wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy to evaluate cells from the cheek may provide a minimally intrusive screening tool for lung cancer, according to research published online Oct. 5 in Cancer Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Peripheral Artery Disease Procedures Recurrent, Costly

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Peripheral artery disease (PAD) carries a high economic burden, with many asymptomatic patients going on to experience an ischemic event requiring hospitalization and many symptomatic patients requiring one or more revascularizations and other procedures, according to research published online Oct. 12 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Reliability of Primary Care Surveys Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Questioning patients about their actual health care experiences rather than asking them to rate their level of satisfaction appears to provide a more reliable assessment of performance among general practices, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Meta-analysis Shows Reboxetine Likely Ineffective

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Reboxetine is likely ineffective for the treatment of major depressive disorder and associated with harmful adverse events, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lifestyle Can Lower Breast CA Risk Despite Family History

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Following American Cancer Society (ACS) guidelines for physical activity, alcohol consumption, and body weight provides similar benefits for postmenopausal women with and without a family history of later-onset breast cancer (FHLBC), according to research published online Oct. 12 in Breast Cancer Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Estrogen Replacement Raises Kidney Stone Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Estrogen therapy appears to significantly increase the risk of kidney stone formation in healthy postmenopausal women, according to research published Oct. 11 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nightly Blood Pressure Dosing Improves Outcomes

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Administration of at least one blood pressure (BP) medication at night instead of upon waking appears to significantly improve BP control, decrease the prevalence of non-dipping, and reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality, according to a study published in the September issue of Chronobiology International.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Experts Propose New Lexicon for Alzheimer's Disease

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The International Working Group for New Research Criteria for the Diagnosis of AD (Alzheimer's disease) has proposed a new lexicon as a point of reference for earlier diagnosis of AD patients in a position paper published online Oct. 11 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Somatic Symptom Burden High in Cancer Patients

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Regardless of cancer type or phase, there is a high prevalence of somatic symptoms in cancer patients with chronic pain or depression, according to research published Oct. 11 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

M.D.-Pharmacist Collaboration Helps Hypertensive Patients

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A collaborative effort of physicians and pharmacists appears to result in improved blood pressure (BP) control in hypertensive patients, and continued education in cessation counseling may help physicians, but perhaps not pharmacists, do a better job at helping patients quit smoking, according to two articles published Oct. 11 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Weber
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Prokhorov
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Insulin Resistance Is Potential Marker for Ischemic Stroke

TUESDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Insulin resistance (IR), as measured by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), appears to be independently associated with an increased risk of first ischemic stroke (IS) among patients without diabetes, potentially providing clinical practitioners with the ability to identify those at high risk of stroke, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

B-Vitamin Therapy May Not Be Useful

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Routine supplementation with folic acid for five years has no effect on cardiovascular outcomes, cancer incidence, or mortality, according to a meta-analysis published Oct. 11 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

More Than One-Third of Women With Epilepsy Infertile

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- For women with epilepsy, the risk of infertility increases with each additional antiepileptic drug (AED), and more than a third may be unable to conceive, according to research published online Oct. 11 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Weight Benefit Seen With Motivational Interviewing

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- During visits with overweight patients, using motivational interviewing techniques while discussing weight may encourage weight loss, according to research published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

43% of Orthopedic Patients Have Low Vitamin D Level

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- There is a high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D within the adult orthopedic surgery population, according to research published in the Oct. 6 issue of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Breast Cancer Treatment Race Disparities Not Socioeconomic

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Racial and ethnic differences in adherence to guideline-recommended breast cancer diagnostics and care remain even after adjustment for insurance coverage and socioeconomic status (SES), according to research published online Oct. 11 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physical Activity Program Tied to Significant Weight Loss

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity and structured weight loss programs appear to be associated with significant weight loss among overweight and obese individuals, according to two studies published online Oct. 9 in JAMA to coincide with presentation at the 28th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Obesity Society, held Oct. 8-12 in San Diego.

Abstract - Goodpaster
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Rock
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial 1 (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial 2 (subscription or payment may be required)

ER Nurses Have Important Role in Psychosocial Interventions

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses play a critical role in calming and comforting emergency department patients, and, with knowledge of what causes patients' fear and anxiety, may be able to apply evidence-based psychosocial interventions to decrease fear and increase comfort, according to a literature review published in the September issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Word Choice Influences Patient Perception of Prognosis

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The way clinicians explain a patient's back pain may influence the patient's perceived prognosis and uptake of therapy; sticking with language used in radiology reports may be more helpful than using degenerative terms, such as "wear and tear," according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Light Drinking in Pregnancy Not a Cause of Childhood Problems

MONDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- At age 5, children of women who were light drinkers during pregnancy do not have higher risk of socioemotional or cognitive deficits than those of women who did not drink at all in pregnancy, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Informant-Based Tool Is Good Screen for Alzheimer's

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A brief informant-based dementia assessment can identify Alzheimer's disease better than more traditional methods and may be a lower-cost alternative for Alzheimer's screening, according to a report published online Sept. 7 in Brain.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Obesity Drug Pulled From U.S. Market

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Abbott Laboratories, maker of Meridia (sibutramine), agreed to voluntarily withdraw the obesity drug from the market because it might place users at increased risk of heart attack and stroke, according to an Oct. 8 announcement from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Press Release
More Information

Low Apgar Scores Associated With Cerebral Palsy

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Low Apgar scores at birth appear to be strongly associated with the development of cerebral palsy, more so in children of normal birth weight than those of low birth weight, according to research published Oct. 7 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Workplace Noise Exposure Linked to Heart Conditions

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic exposure to workplace noise is associated with substantially increased risk for angina pectoris, myocardial infarction (MI), coronary heart disease (CHD), and isolated diastolic hypertension, according to research published online Oct. 5 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Mother's Stress Levels Affect Child's Asthma Status

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Different types of emotional stress and coping behaviors among mothers may have different impacts on children's asthma status, according to a study published Oct. 7 in BioPsychoSocial Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Flu Vaccination Can Prevent Future Epidemic Wave

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza vaccination can mitigate the impact of additional waves in an influenza epidemic even when it appears an epidemic is subsiding, according to research published online Oct. 5 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Full Text

Faith-Based Intervention Facilitates Lifestyle Change

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Sisters in Motion, a faith-based intervention designed to increase walking and lower blood pressure in older, sedentary African-American women appears to be effective, according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Family-Based Treatment Improves Adolescent Anorexia

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A family-based treatment (FBT) approach appears to be more effective in facilitating full remission over the longer term than an adolescent-focused individual therapy (AFT) approach for adolescents with anorexia nervosa, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pregnancy Depression Linked to Adverse Birth Outcomes

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal depression during pregnancy is associated with a higher risk of preterm birth (PTB) and low birth weight (LBW), though the strength of the relationship varies by country, measurement of depression, and, in the United States, socioeconomic status, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Stress Testing Common in Years After Revascularization

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of patients undergoing coronary revascularization are likely to have a stress test in the following two years, with relatively few requiring repeat revascularization, according to research published in the Oct. 12 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Arthritis Prevalence Nearly 25 Percent in U.S. Adults

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly a quarter of U.S. adults have doctor-diagnosed arthritis and many also have arthritis-attributable activity limitation (AAAL); the prevalence of arthritis is particularly high among obese individuals, according to a report published in the Oct. 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Rates Up Slightly in Children

FRIDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Seasonal influenza vaccination coverage rates among children were low for the 2009/2010 season, though they did increase some over the 2008/2009 season, and, from June through September of 2010, low levels of influenza activity were reported, according to two reports published in the Oct. 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text 1
Full Text 2

More Evidence Links Dense Breasts to Later Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and mammographically dense breasts may have an increased risk of subsequent breast cancer, particularly in the opposite breast, according to research published in the October issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cesarean Rates in England Vary Considerably

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- An analysis of cesarean deliveries among different National Health Service (NHS) trusts in England found that, while maternal characteristics differ among the trusts, variation remains, even after adjusting for these characteristics. The researchers recommend examining issues linked to emergency procedures; their work was published Oct. 6 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Mass Media Campaigns Often Beneficially Affect Health

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Mass media campaigns geared to promote better health practices can have a beneficial impact, though their effectiveness varies, according to a review published online Oct. 7 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Americans Do Not Plan to Receive Flu Vaccination

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Almost all physicians plan to get vaccinated against influenza this season and most also discuss the vaccine with patients. However, more than 40 percent of Americans in general do not plan to get vaccinated this season, many of whom have misconceptions about the vaccine or the disease, according to survey results announced by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) at an Oct. 7 news conference.

More Information

Diagnostic X-Ray Exposure Linked to Childhood Leukemia

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Postnatal diagnostic X-ray exposure may be associated with an increased risk of childhood acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), specifically B-cell ALL, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Artemether-Lumefantrine As Effective As Quinine

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The combination of artemether and lumefantrine appears to be better tolerated than, and as effective as, oral quinine for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Ambulatory Physical Activity Low in U.S. Adults

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Adults in the United States appear to take part in less ambulatory physical activity than adults living in other countries, according to a study published in the October issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

U.S. Teen Birth Rate Levels Off After Steady Decline

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The teen birth rate in the United States declined progressively for about a decade but appears to have leveled off for most demographic groups while rising among older Hispanic teens, according to research published online Sept. 27 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Well-Being, Cardiorespiratory Fitness Key to Survival

THURSDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Low levels of negative emotion and high levels of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) are independent predictors of long-term survival, and individuals who have both are at much lower risk of premature death, according to research published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Full Text

ADHD, Conduct Disorder Tied to Later Substance Use Problems

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at risk for adulthood substance use disorders (SUDs), particularly if they have conduct disorder (CD) as well, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Neighborhood Factors Tied to Adolescents' Activity Levels

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The characteristics of an adolescent's neighborhood and his or her perception of it can affect the tendency to engage in active or sedentary behaviors, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Epinephrine for Anaphylaxis by Trained Individuals Endorsed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The Wilderness Medical Society has endorsed the administration of epinephrine to treat anaphylaxis in the field under emergency conditions by trained non-medical professionals, according to a panel statement published in the September issue of Wilderness & Environmental Health.

Full Text

Binge Drinking Common in U.S. Adults, High School Students

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Binge drinking occurs among about a quarter of high school students and adults 18 to 34 years of age and is reported by more than 33 million U.S. adults every year, and the levels do not appear to be declining, according to a report published Oct. 5 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

New Insurance Criteria May Adversely Affect Apnea Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- New local coverage determination (LCD) adherence criteria for continued reimbursement of continuous positive airway pressure after 90 days among patients with obstructive sleep apnea may have a negative impact on their clinical care, according to research published in the October issue of Chest.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Neuroticism Shown to Come at a Considerable Price

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Neuroticism is associated with substantial economic costs that exceed the costs of common mental disorders, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Scoliosis Surgery Can Offer Benefits in Middle-Aged

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with symptomatic scoliosis who are 40 or over are likely to have improvements from surgical treatment, though complications are common, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Increasing Catheter Size Tied to Greater Thrombosis Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Previous deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and increasing catheter size are related to an increased risk for peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-associated DVT, according to a study in the October issue of Chest.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Investigations May Not Lower Risk of Child Maltreatment

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The investigation of suspected child maltreatment by Child Protective Services does not appear to result in an improvement in modifiable risk factors for child maltreatment, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

For Bystander Resuscitation, Compression-Only CPR Better

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (COCPR) administered by laypersons in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest situations is associated with higher survival rates than conventional CPR, according to research published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

CT, MRI During Injury-Related ER Visits on the Rise

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The use of advanced radiographic techniques during injury-related emergency department visits has increased despite no real change in the number of life-threatening or admission-requiring diagnoses, according to research published in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

New Method Could Improve in Vitro Fertilization Outcomes

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- A noninvasive imaging approach for predicting which embryos will reach the blastocyst phase could be useful in assessing the potential of embryos during assisted reproduction, according to research published online Oct. 3 in Nature Biotechnology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Childhood Cancer Survivors Often Forgo Screening

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Many childhood cancer survivors who are at high risk of second malignancies are not undergoing recommended screening procedures, according to a study in the Oct. 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Children With ADHD at Risk for Depression, Suicide Later

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Young children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have more than a four-fold increased risk of depression and a nearly four-fold increased risk of suicide attempt by age 18, according to research published in the October issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Successful Fat Loss May Require Adequate Sleep

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight dieters who don't get enough sleep may lose less fat and more fat-free body mass while experiencing greater hunger than those who get adequate nightly rest, according to research published in the Oct. 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Flu Vaccine in Pregnancy Reduces Infants' Infection Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Women who receive a seasonal influenza vaccination while pregnant may be sparing their infants from risk of influenza, influenza-like illness (ILI), and related hospitalization, according to research published online Oct. 4 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Age at Cancer Diagnosis Similar in AIDS, General Populations

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- After adjustment for the lower proportion of older-age patients among the AIDS population, most cancers in this population are diagnosed at an age similar to that in the general population, according to research published in the Oct. 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Mortality Predictors for Parkinson's Disease Identified

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Age at onset (AAO), chronological age, presence of dementia, motor severity, and psychosis are among the independent factors predictive of mortality in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, according to research published in the Oct. 5 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Validates Noninvasive Blood Test for CAD

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- A new blood test measuring gene expression can modestly increase the accuracy of predicting obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients without diabetes or known CAD, according to research published in the Oct. 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Consensus Statement Pushes Lower BP Goals in Blacks

TUESDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The updated International Society on Hypertension in Blacks (ISHIB) consensus statement on the management of hypertension in this population places a major emphasis on comprehensive assessment and appropriate risk stratification of individual patients with hypertension, according to a report published online Oct. 4 in Hypertension.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Highlights U.S. Adult and Adolescent Sexual Behaviors

MONDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Initial findings from the National Survey of Sexual Health and Behavior (NSSHB), published in nine separate research articles in a special October issue of the Journal of Sexual Medicine, highlight the sexual behaviors and condom use of U.S. adolescents and adults.

More Information

No Single Standard for Faces Pain Scales for Children

MONDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- There is no single faces pain scale for use in children that is superior to the others in all respects, according to an article published online Oct. 4 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

IBM Children's Health Rebate Improves Family Health

MONDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- An employer cash-incentive family health program can help motivate families to eat better, exercise more, and cut back on sedentary pursuits, according to a study published online Oct. 4 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Immunosuppressive Regimen Treats Pediatric Brain Illness

MONDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Immunosuppressive therapy may improve long-term neurological outcomes in children with childhood primary angiitis of the central nervous system (CNS), according to research published online Oct. 4 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Doctors' Exercise Linked to Confidence Counseling Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians' exercise habits and weight are associated with their confidence in their abilities to counsel patients on exercise and diet, as is the level of training they have received in counseling techniques, according to research published in the fall issue of Preventive Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text

Early Pregnancy Sleep Duration Tied to Hypertension Risks

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Both short and long sleep durations during early pregnancy are associated with elevated blood pressure (BP) as well as increased risks of pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia during the third trimester, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of SLEEP.

Abstract

Impaired Kidney Function Linked to Future Stroke Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- A low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is associated with later risk of stroke, and even early stages of chronic kidney disease are associated with a higher risk of subsequent coronary heart disease, according to research published Sept. 30 in BMJ.

Abstract - Lee
Full Text
Abstract - Di Angelantonio
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Empowerment Strategy May Be Beneficial for IVF Decision

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- A strategy to empower couples seeking in vitro fertilization (IVF) to decide how many embryos to transfer could increase the number who use single-embryo transfer, therefore reducing the twin pregnancy rate, according to research published Sept. 30 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Nearly 10 Percent of Adults Report Depression Symptoms

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one out of 10 American adults has symptoms of current depression, with estimates of depression varying widely between states, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Modest Drinking Tied to Lower Cardiac Death Risk in Women

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Lower levels of alcohol intake are associated with a significantly reduced risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) among women, according to research published in the October issue of Heart Rhythm.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

DMARDs, Glucocorticoids, Biologics Similar for RA

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), glucocorticoids, biologics, or a combination of these agents significantly reduces radiographic evidence of joint destruction, with no advantage seen for patients whose treatment includes biologics, according to research published in the October issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Dog Ownership Reduces Risk of Eczema in Dog-Sensitive Children

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Early household exposure to dogs in children who are dog-sensitized results in a four-fold decreased risk of eczema, but early exposure to cats in cat-sensitive children sharply increases the risk of eczema, according to a report published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Calls for Halt on Marketing of Unapproved Colchicine

FRIDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has ordered companies manufacturing, distributing, or marketing unapproved single-ingredient oral colchicine to cease doing so.

More Information

Physician's Briefing

HealthDay

HealthDay is the world’s largest syndicator of health news and content, and providers of custom health/medical content.

Consumer Health News

A health news feed, reviewing the latest and most topical health stories.

Professional News

A news feed for Health Care Professionals (HCPs), reviewing latest medical research and approvals.