Salmonella-Induced Gastroenteritis Ups Risk of IBS

Gastroenteritis in childhood, but not adulthood, increases odds of irritable bowel syndrome

Salmonella-Induced Gastroenteritis Ups Risk of IBS

MONDAY, June 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Salmonella-induced gastroenteritis during childhood is associated with increased risk of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to a study published in the July issue of Gastroenterology.

Cesare Cremon, M.D., from the University of Bologna in Italy, and colleagues used data from a culture-proven foodborne Salmonella enteritidis outbreak in 1994, involving 1,811 patients, mostly pediatric, to examine the risks of IBS and functional dyspepsia (FD). The risks were compared in a cohort of 250 adults exposed to Salmonella as children, 127 individuals exposed as adults, and matched nonexposed controls.

The researchers found that 32.3 percent of the 198 exposed participants reported FD, compared with 27.1 percent of the 188 controls (P = 0.268). A total of 36.8 percent of the 204 exposed participants reported having IBS, compared with 23.3 percent of 189 controls (P = 0.004). Among individuals exposed to Salmonella, the odds ratio for IBS was 1.92. Among individuals exposed to Salmonella as children, the prevalence of IBS was higher than in controls (35.3 versus 20.5 percent; P = 0.008); however, the prevalence was not higher in individuals exposed as adults versus controls. Independent correlations were seen for post-infectious IBS with anxiety and FD.

"Based on data collected from a single culture-proven foodborne Salmonella enteritidis outbreak in 1994, Salmonella-induced gastroenteritis during childhood (but not adulthood) is a risk factor for IBS," the authors write.

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