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August 2007 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for August 2007. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

FDA Approves First Human Thrombin Since 1954

THURSDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Evithrom (human thrombin) -- a blood-clotting protein derived from human plasma -- was approved this week by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. It's the first human thrombin the FDA has approved since 1954, the only such product currently licensed, and is applied to the surface of tissue during surgery to help control oozing and minor bleeding from capillaries and small veins.

More Information

Helicobacter pylori Strain Linked to Gastric Cancer

THURSDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Infection with strains of Helicobacter pylori expressing the cytotoxin-associated (cagA) gene is strongly associated with precancerous gastric lesions, reports a study published online Aug. 28 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gene Variant May Shield Liver from Hepatitis C Harm

MONDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection are less likely to have liver inflammation and fibrosis if they have a specific variant of the gene for toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7), according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Penicillamine Test Imperfect for Detecting Wilson's Disease

FRIDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The penicillamine challenge test can detect Wilson's disease in pediatric patients who are experiencing symptoms but it is less useful for detecting the disease in asymptomatic children or for ruling it out in healthy siblings, according to the results of a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Common in Would-Be Donors

THURSDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- More than six out of 10 prospective living liver donors have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, according to the results of a Korean study published in the August issue of the Journal of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Resident Duty-Hour Cuts Curb Surgeon Job Satisfaction

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Reforms limiting resident duty hours are increasing surgeons' workloads and may be negatively affecting patient care, researchers report in the August issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

On-Demand Surgery for Peritonitis Less Costly

TUESDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with severe secondary peritonitis, on-demand relaparotomy has similar rates of morbidity and mortality as planned relaparotomy but with shorter hospital stays and lower medical costs, according to a report in the Aug. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial - Dellinger
Editorial - Flum

Cognitive Therapy Improves Irritable Bowel Syndrome

TUESDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive behavior therapy works to reduce the overall symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, which in turn helps reduce patients' psychological distress, according to study findings published in the August issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Scombroid Outbreaks Traced to Imported Fish

TUESDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Two outbreaks of scombroid fish poisoning from tuna fish in Louisiana and Tennessee in late 2006 could have been avoided if the fish had been properly refrigerated throughout the supply chain, according to a report published in the Aug. 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More Information

Liver Transplantation Safe in Older Patient Populations

TUESDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Liver transplantation in septuagenarians results in similar rates of survival compared to younger transplant recipients, assuming other risk factors are controlled, according to a report published in the August issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Mucosal Healing Predicts Course of Bowel Disease

MONDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Mucosal healing is useful as a clinical indicator and treatment goal in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, according to a report in the August issue of Gastroenterology. Mucosal healing was associated with a low risk of future colectomy, less inflammation after five years, and lower future steroid treatment.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Chronic Constipation in Women Linked to Prostaglandins

MONDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Women with chronic constipation due to slow transit have abnormal muscle tissue levels of prostaglandin and cyclooxygenase enzymes that may be responsible for the condition, researchers report in the August issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Esophageal Cancer Surgery Has Low Cure Rate

MONDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Short-term survival rates are poor for patients undergoing surgery or surgery with chemotherapy for esophageal cancer unless all resection tissue margins are disease-free, making the identification of new chemotherapeutic regimens a high priority, according to a report published in the Aug. 20 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hemochromatosis Fades as Threat in Liver Transplants

FRIDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The survival rates of liver transplant patients who have hemochromatosis have improved dramatically over the past decade and are now almost identical to the average survival rate of all liver transplant patients, researchers report in the August issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gestational Diabetes Raises Pancreatic Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Women who develop gestational diabetes are at increased risk of pancreatic cancer later in life, according to a study published online Aug. 16 in the open access journal BMC Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Patient Characteristics Predict Relapse in Ulcerative Colitis

THURSDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Two-thirds of patients with ulcerative colitis will experience a relapse during a 10-year period, and females and those with more education tend to relapse earlier, while smokers have fewer overall relapses, according to study findings published in the August issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. In addition, a short time to first relapse is associated with more total relapses.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Decline in Gastric Cancer Predicted Over Next Decade

THURSDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of gastric cancer should decline in Western countries by at least 24 percent over the next decade due to treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections, according to study findings published online Aug. 14 in Gut.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Consumer Drug Ad Spending Continues to Rise

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Despite criticism of direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising in recent years, more money is being spent on promoting drugs directly to patients, researchers report in the Aug. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. At the same time, the proportion of broadcast advertisements that were reviewed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration before being aired dropped from 64 percent in 1999 to 32 percent in 2004.

Abstract
Full Text

Norepinephrine Can Boost Campylobacter Virulence

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- When Campylobacter jejuni is grown in iron-limited media in the presence of norepinephrine, virulence-associated properties are increased compared to cultures grown in the absence of norepinephrine, according to a report in the August issue of Gut. The findings suggest that stress may affect the pathogenicity of the bacteria in food animals or humans, according to an editorial.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Novel Treatment for Barrett's Esophagus Shows Promise

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with short-segment Barrett's esophagus (SSBE), banding without resection appears to be a safe and effective way to eradicate the diseased tissue, according to study findings published in the August issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

High-Fat Diet Associated with Colon Cancer Recurrence

TUESDAY, Aug. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A Western-style diet that is rich in meat, fat, refined grains and desserts is associated with a substantially higher risk of recurrence and mortality among patients being treated for stage III colon cancer, according to a prospective observational study in the Aug. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Sees No Heart Risk With Heartburn Drugs

FRIDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The popular heartburn drugs Prilosec and Nexium don't cause heart problems, U.S. health officials said Thursday. The sudden announcement followed a government safety review after reports of a possible risk emerged from preliminary studies.

More Information

Probiotics Have Varying Efficacy in Childhood Diarrhea

FRIDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Not all probiotic preparations are effective in the treatment of children with acute diarrhea. Their efficacy appears to depend on which strains of bacteria they contain, according to the results of a randomized trial published online Aug. 9 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

Videocapsule Endoscopy Effective for Celiac Disease

FRIDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Videocapsule endoscopy, which examines the entire small bowel, has a high sensitivity and specificity in detecting celiac disease, researchers report in the August issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Leptin Makes Food Seem Less Enticing, Boosts Satiety

THURSDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Leptin appears to modulate neural responses to visual food stimuli, leading to increased satiety and a diminished perception of how rewarding food will be, according to a study published online Aug. 9 in Science.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Vitamins, Minerals Don't Reduce Liver Cancer Mortality

THURSDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Certain combinations of vitamin and mineral supplements do not reduce the overall risk of liver cancer mortality, but may benefit certain subgroups of patients, according to study findings published online Aug. 8 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Drug Prevents Bleeding After Surgery for Gastric Cancer

THURSDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A proton pump inhibitor is more effective than an H2-receptor antagonist in preventing delayed bleeding after endoscopy for early gastric cancer, according to the results of a study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Dietary Choline Linked to Risk of Colorectal Adenomas

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A higher dietary intake of choline, which is found in organ meats, eggs and wheat germ, is associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas in women, contrary to the expectations of researchers, according to a report published online Aug. 8 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Anxiety Raises Irritable Bowel Syndrome Risk After Illness

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with high stress and anxiety levels who don't rest during a bout of acute gastroenteritis seem to be more likely to develop irritable bowel syndrome than those who have less stress, according to a prospective study in the August issue of the journal Gut.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Surgical Delay Works for Many with Pancreatic Neoplasms

TUESDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than one in five patients with pancreatic branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (BD-IPMN) should have surgery, according to a report in the August issue of Gut.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Common Geriatric Conditions Linked to Disability

TUESDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, geriatric conditions that are not part of the traditional disease model of medicine are significantly associated with disability, according to the results of a study published in the Aug. 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Crohn's Risk Lower in Children Exposed to Farm Animals

MONDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Contact with farm animals during infancy, which is thought to protect against childhood allergies, may have a similar effect on juvenile Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, researchers report in the August issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Warns of Botulism Risk Linked to Canned Green Beans

FRIDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Friday that some brands of French cut, canned green beans may possibly be contaminated with botulinum toxin. The 14.5-ounce cans were produced by Lakeside Foods Inc., of Manitowoc, Wisconsin, and sold under a variety of labels.

More Information - FDA
More Information - Lakeside Foods, Inc.

Bowel and Orthopedic Diseases Share Genetic Link

THURSDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- A case-control study of Icelanders has offered "the first direct evidence to support a common genetic component for inflammatory bowel disease and ankylosing spondylitis," say researchers in the August issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Heavy Coffee Drinkers Have Lower Risk for Liver Cancer

THURSDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Heavy coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk of liver cancer, according to a study published in the August issue of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for August 2007. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

FDA Approves First Human Thrombin Since 1954

THURSDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Evithrom (human thrombin) -- a blood-clotting protein derived from human plasma -- was approved this week by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. It's the first human thrombin the FDA has approved since 1954, the only such product currently licensed, and is applied to the surface of tissue during surgery to help control oozing and minor bleeding from capillaries and small veins.

More Information

Helicobacter pylori Strain Linked to Gastric Cancer

THURSDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Infection with strains of Helicobacter pylori expressing the cytotoxin-associated (cagA) gene is strongly associated with precancerous gastric lesions, reports a study published online Aug. 28 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gene Variant May Shield Liver from Hepatitis C Harm

MONDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection are less likely to have liver inflammation and fibrosis if they have a specific variant of the gene for toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7), according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Penicillamine Test Imperfect for Detecting Wilson's Disease

FRIDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The penicillamine challenge test can detect Wilson's disease in pediatric patients who are experiencing symptoms but it is less useful for detecting the disease in asymptomatic children or for ruling it out in healthy siblings, according to the results of a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Common in Would-Be Donors

THURSDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- More than six out of 10 prospective living liver donors have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, according to the results of a Korean study published in the August issue of the Journal of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Resident Duty-Hour Cuts Curb Surgeon Job Satisfaction

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Reforms limiting resident duty hours are increasing surgeons' workloads and may be negatively affecting patient care, researchers report in the August issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

On-Demand Surgery for Peritonitis Less Costly

TUESDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with severe secondary peritonitis, on-demand relaparotomy has similar rates of morbidity and mortality as planned relaparotomy but with shorter hospital stays and lower medical costs, according to a report in the Aug. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial - Dellinger
Editorial - Flum

Cognitive Therapy Improves Irritable Bowel Syndrome

TUESDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive behavior therapy works to reduce the overall symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, which in turn helps reduce patients' psychological distress, according to study findings published in the August issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Scombroid Outbreaks Traced to Imported Fish

TUESDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Two outbreaks of scombroid fish poisoning from tuna fish in Louisiana and Tennessee in late 2006 could have been avoided if the fish had been properly refrigerated throughout the supply chain, according to a report published in the Aug. 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More Information

Liver Transplantation Safe in Older Patient Populations

TUESDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Liver transplantation in septuagenarians results in similar rates of survival compared to younger transplant recipients, assuming other risk factors are controlled, according to a report published in the August issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Mucosal Healing Predicts Course of Bowel Disease

MONDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Mucosal healing is useful as a clinical indicator and treatment goal in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, according to a report in the August issue of Gastroenterology. Mucosal healing was associated with a low risk of future colectomy, less inflammation after five years, and lower future steroid treatment.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Chronic Constipation in Women Linked to Prostaglandins

MONDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Women with chronic constipation due to slow transit have abnormal muscle tissue levels of prostaglandin and cyclooxygenase enzymes that may be responsible for the condition, researchers report in the August issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Esophageal Cancer Surgery Has Low Cure Rate

MONDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Short-term survival rates are poor for patients undergoing surgery or surgery with chemotherapy for esophageal cancer unless all resection tissue margins are disease-free, making the identification of new chemotherapeutic regimens a high priority, according to a report published in the Aug. 20 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hemochromatosis Fades as Threat in Liver Transplants

FRIDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The survival rates of liver transplant patients who have hemochromatosis have improved dramatically over the past decade and are now almost identical to the average survival rate of all liver transplant patients, researchers report in the August issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gestational Diabetes Raises Pancreatic Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Women who develop gestational diabetes are at increased risk of pancreatic cancer later in life, according to a study published online Aug. 16 in the open access journal BMC Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Patient Characteristics Predict Relapse in Ulcerative Colitis

THURSDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Two-thirds of patients with ulcerative colitis will experience a relapse during a 10-year period, and females and those with more education tend to relapse earlier, while smokers have fewer overall relapses, according to study findings published in the August issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. In addition, a short time to first relapse is associated with more total relapses.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Decline in Gastric Cancer Predicted Over Next Decade

THURSDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of gastric cancer should decline in Western countries by at least 24 percent over the next decade due to treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections, according to study findings published online Aug. 14 in Gut.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Consumer Drug Ad Spending Continues to Rise

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Despite criticism of direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising in recent years, more money is being spent on promoting drugs directly to patients, researchers report in the Aug. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. At the same time, the proportion of broadcast advertisements that were reviewed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration before being aired dropped from 64 percent in 1999 to 32 percent in 2004.

Abstract
Full Text

Norepinephrine Can Boost Campylobacter Virulence

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- When Campylobacter jejuni is grown in iron-limited media in the presence of norepinephrine, virulence-associated properties are increased compared to cultures grown in the absence of norepinephrine, according to a report in the August issue of Gut. The findings suggest that stress may affect the pathogenicity of the bacteria in food animals or humans, according to an editorial.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Novel Treatment for Barrett's Esophagus Shows Promise

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with short-segment Barrett's esophagus (SSBE), banding without resection appears to be a safe and effective way to eradicate the diseased tissue, according to study findings published in the August issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

High-Fat Diet Associated with Colon Cancer Recurrence

TUESDAY, Aug. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A Western-style diet that is rich in meat, fat, refined grains and desserts is associated with a substantially higher risk of recurrence and mortality among patients being treated for stage III colon cancer, according to a prospective observational study in the Aug. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Sees No Heart Risk With Heartburn Drugs

FRIDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The popular heartburn drugs Prilosec and Nexium don't cause heart problems, U.S. health officials said Thursday. The sudden announcement followed a government safety review after reports of a possible risk emerged from preliminary studies.

More Information

Probiotics Have Varying Efficacy in Childhood Diarrhea

FRIDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Not all probiotic preparations are effective in the treatment of children with acute diarrhea. Their efficacy appears to depend on which strains of bacteria they contain, according to the results of a randomized trial published online Aug. 9 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

Videocapsule Endoscopy Effective for Celiac Disease

FRIDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Videocapsule endoscopy, which examines the entire small bowel, has a high sensitivity and specificity in detecting celiac disease, researchers report in the August issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Leptin Makes Food Seem Less Enticing, Boosts Satiety

THURSDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Leptin appears to modulate neural responses to visual food stimuli, leading to increased satiety and a diminished perception of how rewarding food will be, according to a study published online Aug. 9 in Science.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Vitamins, Minerals Don't Reduce Liver Cancer Mortality

THURSDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Certain combinations of vitamin and mineral supplements do not reduce the overall risk of liver cancer mortality, but may benefit certain subgroups of patients, according to study findings published online Aug. 8 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Drug Prevents Bleeding After Surgery for Gastric Cancer

THURSDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A proton pump inhibitor is more effective than an H2-receptor antagonist in preventing delayed bleeding after endoscopy for early gastric cancer, according to the results of a study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Dietary Choline Linked to Risk of Colorectal Adenomas

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A higher dietary intake of choline, which is found in organ meats, eggs and wheat germ, is associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas in women, contrary to the expectations of researchers, according to a report published online Aug. 8 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Anxiety Raises Irritable Bowel Syndrome Risk After Illness

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with high stress and anxiety levels who don't rest during a bout of acute gastroenteritis seem to be more likely to develop irritable bowel syndrome than those who have less stress, according to a prospective study in the August issue of the journal Gut.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Surgical Delay Works for Many with Pancreatic Neoplasms

TUESDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer than one in five patients with pancreatic branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (BD-IPMN) should have surgery, according to a report in the August issue of Gut.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Common Geriatric Conditions Linked to Disability

TUESDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, geriatric conditions that are not part of the traditional disease model of medicine are significantly associated with disability, according to the results of a study published in the Aug. 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Crohn's Risk Lower in Children Exposed to Farm Animals

MONDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Contact with farm animals during infancy, which is thought to protect against childhood allergies, may have a similar effect on juvenile Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, researchers report in the August issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Warns of Botulism Risk Linked to Canned Green Beans

FRIDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Friday that some brands of French cut, canned green beans may possibly be contaminated with botulinum toxin. The 14.5-ounce cans were produced by Lakeside Foods Inc., of Manitowoc, Wisconsin, and sold under a variety of labels.

More Information - FDA
More Information - Lakeside Foods, Inc.

Bowel and Orthopedic Diseases Share Genetic Link

THURSDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- A case-control study of Icelanders has offered "the first direct evidence to support a common genetic component for inflammatory bowel disease and ankylosing spondylitis," say researchers in the August issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Heavy Coffee Drinkers Have Lower Risk for Liver Cancer

THURSDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Heavy coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk of liver cancer, according to a study published in the August issue of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text

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