January 2009 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for January 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Data Point Out Why Certain Mutation in GI Tumor Occurs

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- New evidence may explain why just isoleucine is naturally selected as a resistance mutant at position 670 of the tyrosine kinase KIT in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) treated with imatinib, according to research published in the Feb. 4 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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US Outpatient Surgeries Increasingly Common

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Outpatient surgery visits are rising in the United States, with the number increasing from 20.8 million in 1996 to 34.7 million in 2006. They now account for nearly two-thirds of all surgery visits compared to about half of all surgery visits in 1996, according to a report issued Jan. 28 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Cruciferous Compound Has Effect on Pancreatic Cancer

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), found in broccoli, cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables, can induce apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells, according to research published in the Feb. 4 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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In-Flight Medical Emergencies Poorly Documented

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the fact that the airline industry is nationally and internationally regulated, there is no standardized documentation of in-flight medical emergencies, according to a report published Jan. 20 in the open access journal Critical Care.

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Bisphenol A Levels Do Not Decrease with Fasting

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphenol A, an industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins and polyvinyl chloride plastic, may accumulate in body tissue or be ingested via substantial non-food sources, according to study findings published online Jan. 28 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Clopidogrel/Proton Pump Inhibitor Combo Questioned

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Heart attack patients who take both clopidogrel and a proton pump inhibitor other than pantoprazole have an increased risk of reinfarction and may lose the beneficial effects of clopidogrel, according to research published online Jan. 28 in CMAJ, the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

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Clinical Information Technology Leads to Safer Hospitals

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that make use of clinical information technology to automate notes, records, order entry and clinical decision support have lower mortality rates, fewer complications and also save money, according to a report published in the Jan. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea Linked to Insulin Resistance

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with insulin resistance in obesity and also independently of obesity, which may increase the risk of developing other chronic conditions, according to two studies published in the February issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Salmonella Outbreaks Highlight Risk from Live Poultry

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to live poultry caused two separate outbreaks of Salmonella in the United States in 2007, according to a report published in the Jan. 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Protein Activity Points to Bacterial Persistence

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A greater understanding of the mechanisms that underlie persistence in Escherichia coli may point to therapies that reduce bacterial multi-drug tolerance, according to research published in the Jan. 16 issue of Science.

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Peanut Butter Crackers, Dog Snacks Among Recalled Items

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The list of recalled products resulting from the recent Salmonella typhimurium outbreak has grown, and officials believe a processing plant in Blakely, Ga., may be the source of the outbreak, according to officials speaking at a teleconference conducted Jan. 21 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Endoluminal Therapies Effective for Treatment of GERD

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Endoluminal therapies, including full-thickness plication and endoscopic radiofrequency, provide symptomatic relief and lead to reduced reliance on proton pump inhibitor drugs in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), according to research published in the January issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Laparoscopic Pyloromyotomy Benefits Infants Most

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Both open and laparoscopic pyloromyotomy are safe and effective in treating pyloric stenosis in infants, although infants undergoing laparoscopy achieve full enteral feeding faster and have shorter hospital stays, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in The Lancet.

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Stepwise Dyspepsia Treatment Effective; Order Affects Cost

FRIDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Treating dyspepsia patients stepwise with three drugs in a particular order is as effective but less costly than stepwise treatment with the same three drugs in the reverse order, researchers report in the Jan. 17 issue of The Lancet.

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Improvements Needed for Colorectal Cancer Screening

THURSDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Improvements to colon cancer screening implementation, including better and broader delivery of the service as well as offering guidance to physicians for better adherence to established guidelines, are important strategies to allow patients to achieve the best screening results, according to several studies published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Weight Loss Linked with Liver Improvement

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Orlistat induces moderate weight loss associated with significant improvements in insulin resistance, steatosis and liver histology, according to the results of a study published in the January issue of Hepatology.

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Link Between Hepatitis C Virus, Liver Cancers Explored

TUESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with over a twofold increased risk of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), suggesting the risk of HCV-associated cancer is not limited to hepatocellular carcinoma, according to research published in the January issue of Hepatology.

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Black Raspberry Anthocyanins May Have Anti-Cancer Effect

FRIDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Black raspberry anthocyanins -- and other constituents in the berries -- may help prevent esophageal cancer, according to research published in the January issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

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Menopausal Hormone Therapy Tied to Less Colorectal Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Hormone therapy during menopause was associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, particularly estrogen plus progestin use, according to research published in the January issue of Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Adjuvant Chemotherapy Benefits Colon Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery for colon cancer improves survival, largely by reducing the recurrence rate in the first two years, with low recurrence rates after five years, according to a report published online Jan. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Hundreds Acquired Hepatitis B, C in US Health Care Settings

TUESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- More than 400 people were found to have acquired hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) in non-hospital health care settings since 1998 in the United States, with more than 60,000 estimated to have been at risk during these outbreaks, according to research published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Obesity Linked to Diverticular Disease in Older Men

MONDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- In older men, obesity significantly increases the risks of diverticulitis and diverticular bleeding, researchers report in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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Celiac Disease in Sibling Ups Risk of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

MONDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Celiac disease patients have a significantly increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and the risk has steadily declined in the last 40 years, but siblings of celiac disease patients also have an increased risk of NHL, according to study findings published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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