Red Wine May Help Prevent Alzheimer's

Cabernet Sauvignon appears to inhibit proteins that cause plaque buildup in brain

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WEDNESDAY, Sept. 27, 2006 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking Cabernet Sauvignon may help prevent Alzheimer's disease, according to new animal research.

Reporting in the November issue of the FASEB Journal, researchers observed the effects of feeding the red wine to mice with Alzheimer's disease-type brain changes.

Compared to mice that received ethanol or water, the mice that were given Cabernet Sauvignon experienced significantly reduced Alzheimer's disease-type brain deterioration of memory function.

The researchers, from Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City, found Cabernet Sauvignon's benefits were due to its ability to prevent the generation of proteins that cause plaque build-up in the brain, which is the main characteristic of Alzheimer's disease.

"This study supports epidemiological evidence indicating that moderate wine consumption, within the range recommended by the FDA dietary guidelines of one drink per day for women and two for men, may help reduce the relative risk for AD clinical dementia," researchers Dr. Giulio Maria Pasinetti and Dr. Jun Wang said in a prepared statement.

The study findings will also be presented Oct 14-18 at the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting, in Atlanta.

More information

The National Institute on Aging has more about Alzheimer's disease.

SOURCE: Mount Sinai Medical Center, news release, Sept. 18, 2006

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