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ASTRO: Breast Cancer Recurrence Unaffected By Age

After 15 years, recurrence rates for ductal carcinoma in situ are no higher for women who were treated at age 40 or younger

THURSDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients who receive lumpectomy and whole-body radiation for ductal carcinoma in situ, recurrence rates do not significantly vary by age, according to research presented at the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology's 50th Annual Meeting held Sept. 21 to 25 in Boston.

Aruna Turaka, M.D., of the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, and colleagues studied the records of 440 patients -- including 24 who were age 40 or younger -- who received treatment between 1978 and 2007 at the center.

After 15 years, the researchers found that recurrence rates were 10 percent in patients who were ages 40 and younger, 7 percent in patients who were ages 41 to 54, 11 percent in patients who were ages 55 to 69, and 4 percent in patients who are ages 70 and older. They also found that there were no significant differences in recurrence rates based on close (3 percent), positive (9 percent) or negative (10 percent) margins.

"Our study suggests that when treating ductal carcinoma in situ with breast-conserving surgery and radiation, very young age plays a smaller role as a contributor to local recurrence than previously suggested," Turaka said in a statement. "These results are specific to one institution. The reasons for the low rates of recurrence in young women could be related to the careful patient selection and a high utilization of surgical re-excision and a radiation boost."

Abstract #1085
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