Regular Aspirin Use Linked to Drop in Pancreatic Cancer Risk

Risk decreases for each year of use and for increasing years in the past that aspirin use started

Regular Aspirin Use Linked to Drop in Pancreatic Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, June 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Regular aspirin use may be associated with a reduction in the risk of pancreatic cancer, according to a study published online June 26 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Samantha A. Streicher, from the Yale School of Public Health in New Haven, Conn., and colleagues used data from a population-based Connecticut study to examine a possible association between aspirin use and the risk of pancreatic cancer. Data were included for 362 pancreas-cancer cases that were frequency-matched to 690 randomly sampled controls.

The researchers found that regular aspirin use correlated with a lower risk of pancreatic cancer overall (odds ratio [OR], 0.52; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.39 to 0.69). The risk of pancreatic cancer decreased incrementally with each year of low-dose or regular-dose aspirin use (ORs, 0.94 [95 percent CI, 0.91 to 0.98] and 0.98 [95 percent CI, 0.96 to 1.01], respectively). There was also an incremental decrease for increasing years in the past that low-dose or regular-dose aspirin use had started (ORs, 0.95 [95 percent CI, 0.92 to 0.99] and 0.98 [95 percent CI, 0.96 to 1.00], respectively). In most categories of calendar time period of aspirin use, both low-dose and regular-dose aspirin use correlated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Termination of aspirin use within two years of interview was associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer, relative to continuing use at the time of interview (OR, 3.24; 95 percent CI, 1.58 to 6.65).

"Our results provide some support that a daily aspirin regimen may reduce risk of developing pancreatic cancer," the authors write.

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