Higher Poststroke Glucose Levels Tied to Faster Cognitive Decline

However, no associations seen for blood pressure or cholesterol levels

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FRIDAY, May 26, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Higher poststroke glucose levels are associated with faster subsequent global cognitive decline, according to research published online May 17 in JAMA Network Open.

Deborah A. Levine, M.D., M.P.H., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis using individual participant data from 982 stroke survivors from four cohort studies to estimate changes in cognition after incident stroke (median follow-up, 4.7 years).

The researchers found that cumulative mean poststroke systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were not associated with any cognitive outcome. A higher cumulative mean poststroke glucose level was associated with faster decline in global cognition when adjusting for cumulative mean poststroke systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (−0.04 points/year faster per each 10-mg/dL increase). No associations were seen for glucose and executive function or memory. Results were similar when controlling for apolipoprotein E4 and apolipoprotein E4 × time.

"These findings suggest that higher cumulative glucose levels may contribute to faster cognitive decline in stroke survivors, representing a potential treatment target to preserve cognition after stroke," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed funding and personal fees from various organizations.

Abstract/Full Text

Lori Solomon

Lori Solomon

Medically reviewed by Mark Arredondo, M.D.

Published on May 26, 2023

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