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April 2012 Briefing - HIV & AIDS

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in HIV & AIDS for April 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Antiretroviral Prophylaxis May Cut Breastfeeding HIV Spread

THURSDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding HIV-infected mothers are less likely to transmit the virus to their infants when either receive antiretroviral drugs, although weaning at six months may be detrimental, according to updated trial results published online April 26 in The Lancet.

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Preexposure Chemoprophylaxis Cuts HIV Infection at a Cost

TUESDAY, April 17 (HealthDay News) -- Models show daily oral preexposure chemoprophylaxis (PrEP) in the general population of men who have sex with men (MSM) could prevent a substantial number of HIV infections, but at a high cost, according to a study published in the April 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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STI Screening Improves With Free, Home-Based Testing

WEDNESDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- The availability of free and home-based screening tests for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is associated with a higher rate of screening completion, according to a study published in the April issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Medical Malpractice Claims Incur Substantial Defense Costs

WEDNESDAY, April 4 (HealthDay News) -- Defense costs for medical malpractice claims vary among specialties and are higher for claims that result in indemnity payments, according to a letter published in the April 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Antibodies to HIV-1 Proteins Impact Vaccine Efficacy

WEDNESDAY, April 4 (HealthDay News) -- Antibodies to HIV-1 proteins may play a role in the efficacy of HIV-1 vaccination, according to a study published in the April 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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