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December 2008 Briefing - HIV & AIDS

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in HIV & AIDS for December 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

HIV Therapy May Affect Human Papillomavirus

MONDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In HIV-infected women with pre-existing abnormal cervical cytology, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) may enhance clearance of human papillomavirus (HPV) in those who already have cervical disease, according to research published in the January issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Needle and Syringe Programs Reduce HIV in Prisons

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing injection drug use in prison to reduce HIV transmission is most effectively done by needle and syringe programs and methadone treatment, according to a review in the January issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Antibody Improves Immunity Against Monkey Form of HIV

THURSDAY, Dec. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Monkeys chronically infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a monkey form of HIV, have improved immune responses and better survival after treatment with an antibody, according to research published online Dec. 10 in Nature.

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Carraguard Does Not Prevent Vaginal HIV Transmission

FRIDAY, Dec. 5 (HealthDay News) -- A carrageenan-based compound, Carraguard, is not effective in preventing vaginal transmission of HIV, researchers report in the Dec. 6 issue of The Lancet.

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Immune System More Effective in HIV-Resistant People

FRIDAY, Dec. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Rare individuals who are able to control their HIV infection without drugs have immune systems that are much more effective at killing HIV-infected cells, according to study findings published in the Dec. 4 issue of Immunity.

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Physician's Briefing
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