Acquire the license to the best health content in the world
Contact Us

July 2008 Briefing - HIV & AIDS

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in HIV & AIDS for July 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Deportation Linked to More HIV Infection in Male Mexicans

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The likelihood of HIV infection among injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico depends on gender and how long they have lived in Tijuana, with a higher prevalence among males deported from the United States, according to the results of a study published online July 29 in PLoS ONE.

Full Text

United States' AIDS Relief Plan at Crossroads

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has achieved dramatic results so far, thanks to a strong results-oriented focus and sense of urgency, but as Congress reauthorizes funding for the program, it must consider where it goes from here, according to an article published online July 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text

Microbicidal HIV Prevention Trial Halted Early

WEDNESDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Cellulose sulfate gel -- investigated as a vaginal microbicide against HIV -- didn't reduce HIV infections and may have even increased the risk in a sample of women, according to research published in the July 31 New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hepatitis C Doesn't Impair CD4 Recovery in HIV Context

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Coinfection with hepatitis C virus does not reduce CD4 recovery in subjects with HIV who are receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy, according to research published in the July AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nevirapine Dosing Studied in Breast-Feeding Moms with HIV

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- In HIV-infected mothers, risk of HIV transmission to their uninfected breast-feeding infants may be reduced by a prolonged postpartum course of nevirapine, according to an article published in the July 26 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

HIV Transmission Possible Despite Effective Treatment

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- While individual risk of HIV transmission per sexual encounter is fairly small when one partner is effectively treated and the other is seronegative, the rate of transmission over large numbers of sexual encounters may be substantial, according to research published in the July 26 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Timing Is Crucial in Measles Vaccination

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- The age at which the protective effect of maternal measles antibodies wears off varies widely from region to region and should be taken into account when formulating optimum immunization strategies, according to an editorial published online July 24 in BMJ.

Editorial

HIV Survival Increases with Antiretroviral Therapy

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Significant declines in mortality and an increase in life expectancy have been seen among HIV-positive patients using combination antiretroviral therapy, according to study findings published in the July 26 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Raltegravir Beneficial in Drug-Resistant HIV

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with drug-resistant HIV, treatment with raltegravir -- an integrase inhibitor -- in combination with optimized background therapy leads to significantly improved viral suppression, according to two studies published in the July 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Steigbigel
Full Text
Abstract - Cooper
Full Text
Editorial

'Tier 4' Drugs Raise Questions About Affordability

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- The emergence of a fourth tier of copayment for expensive drugs calls into question how Americans are going to handle the rising costs of health care, according to a perspective article in the July 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Consequences of Genetic Non-Discrimination Act Examined

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- The Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act (GINA), recently signed into U.S. law, creates a troublesome distinction between those at genetic risk for a disease and those with other characteristics that predispose them to a condition, according to a perspective article published in the July 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Physicians to Get Bonus for Electronic Prescribing

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors using an electronic prescriptions system will be eligible for a bonus from Medicare from 2009 onwards for four years, according to U.S. health officials.

More Information

Genetic Variation May Raise HIV Risk in African Americans

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- A genetic variation that provides protection from Plasmodium vivax malaria appears to increase susceptibility to HIV infection, according to research published in the July 17 issue of Cell Host & Microbe.

Abstract
Full Text

Shifts in Focus Could Reduce Tuberculosis

TUESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Focusing on some foreign-born individuals with latent tuberculosis infection may represent one of the more effective options for improving TB control in this group in the United States, and a framework of strategic activities in HIV care programs could address pressing global concerns related to TB, according to two studies in the July 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Cain
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Havlir
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Homosexuals in Pakistan at High Risk of HIV Infection

TUESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Although homosexuality is prohibited in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, it is widely practiced and men who have sex with men are at high risk of HIV infection. Policy changes are needed in Pakistan to reach this vulnerable population, according to an article published in the August issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Anti-HIV Microbicides Could Have Surprising Outcomes

FRIDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Vaginal microbicides containing antiretrovirals to prevent HIV infection in women could lead to many cases of drug resistance, according to research published in the July 15 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text

Exception Reporting Improves Pay-for-Performance Benefits

THURSDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Pay-for-performance programs benefit from use of exclusion reporting, whereby certain patients are excluded from quality calculations, and the practice of excluding patients to disguise missed targets, known as gaming, is rare, according to study findings published in the July 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medical Education Must Adapt to Changing Times

THURSDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Medical schools must adapt their admission requirements and curricula to changes in scientific theory, and are also facing a challenge to the traditional definition of who is suited to the study of medicine, according to two articles published in the July 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Dienstag
Full Text
Abstract - Jauhar
Full Text

AMA Actions Fostered U.S. Medical Racial Divide

TUESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- From the post-Civil War years to the civil rights era a century later, the American Medical Association (AMA) made decisions that helped support a division between white and black Americans in the field of medicine in the United States, according to an article in the July 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Cancers Increasing in HIV-Infected Patients

THURSDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Although treatment advances have reduced HIV-related deaths in HIV-infected patients, they are at increasing risk of dying from cancer, and little is known about optimal treatments or the effects of combining antiretroviral and anticancer drugs, according to a review published online June 30 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Health Cash Incentives for Poor People Debated

WEDNESDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Should disadvantaged people be paid to take care of their health? That's the question of a "Head to Head" debate published online July 8 in BMJ.

Abstract - Cookson
Full Text
Abstract - Popay
Full Text
Editorial

Increase Seen in HIV Diagnoses Among Young Men

THURSDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Data from 33 states on new HIV diagnoses shows that from 2001 to 2006 there was a 12 percent rise in diagnoses among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the 13 to 24 age group, according to a report published in the June 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More Information

Access to Treatment Pushes HIV Mortality Rates Down

TUESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Because of the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, mortality rates for HIV patients have declined and are now much closer to mortality rates in the general population, according to a report published in the July 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Physician's Briefing