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November 2007 Briefing - HIV & AIDS

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in HIV & AIDS for November 2007. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Study Explores Timing of Sexual Debut on Outcomes

FRIDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Early initiation of sexual activity among adolescents is associated with long-term negative sexual outcomes such as increased sexual risk behaviors and problems in sexual functioning, reports an article published online Nov. 29 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Myths Contributing to Continuing HIV Epidemics

FRIDAY, Nov. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Ten misconceptions are hindering HIV prevention efforts in Africa, according to a commentary published in the Dec. 1 issue of The Lancet.

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Vector Tested in HIV-1 Vaccine Falls Short

MONDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors, tested as potential carriers of vaccines for HIV-1, may not stimulate the appropriate immunological response required for a vaccine, according to research published online Nov. 15 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Homeopathy Still Popular in United Kingdom and India

FRIDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Homeopathy remains a popular health care choice in the United Kingdom despite a new campaign against it by medical doctors, research scientists and the media, according to a special report in the Nov. 17 issue of The Lancet. The issue also includes a review of the widespread use of homeopathy in India.

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Editorial

Cystatin C Is Marker of Kidney Function in HIV Patients

FRIDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with HIV, cystatin C measurement may be a useful clinical tool to help identify those who have an elevated risk of developing kidney and cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the Nov. 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Human Genome Remnants Could Be HIV Vaccine Target

MONDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Normally inactive remnants of ancient infections that are integrated in the human genome are active in HIV-1-infected people and could present a target for immunotherapeutic vaccination, according to study findings published in the November issue of PLoS Pathogens.

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Workplace Inequalities Exist Among Those with HIV

FRIDAY, Nov. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Among those with chronic HIV disease, women and those with less education are more likely than men or those with higher education to lose their jobs, according to a report published online Nov. 2 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Sex Abroad Points to Riskier Sexual Lifestyle

THURSDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- One-fifth of young travelers from the United Kingdom find sexual partners while overseas, and are putting themselves at increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases, according to a report published online Nov. 8 in Sexually Transmitted Infections.

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Prenatal Drug Therapy Reduces HIV Drug Resistance

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In pregnant women infected with HIV, a single dose of tenofovir and emtricitabine administered at delivery as an adjunct to nevirapine results in reduced resistance to non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors six weeks after delivery, according to study findings published online Nov. 7 in The Lancet.

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Editorial

Races Face Vastly Different Kidney Burden with HIV

THURSDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Race is a critical factor in determining the risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in people with HIV, with the incidence of ESRD roughly 10 times higher among blacks with HIV than whites with the virus, according to research published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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