September 2007 Briefing - HIV & AIDS

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in HIV & AIDS for September 2007. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Kaposi's Sarcoma Can Persist Despite Good HIV Control

THURSDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-infected patients can have persistent Kaposi's sarcoma despite good viral control and reasonable CD4 cell counts by maximal antiretroviral therapy, according to a letter published in the Sept. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Genes Affect Treatment in Patients with HIV, Hepatitis C

THURSDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic factors can influence the degree to which persons co-infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV respond to pegylated interferon treatment, researchers report in the September issue of the Journal of Hepatology.

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Familiar Doctor Linked to More Satisfaction for Urgent Care

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who receive urgent medical care from family physicians or after-hours clinics affiliated with their physicians are more likely to be satisfied with the encounter than patients who use other sources of urgent care, according to research published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Proportion of New HIV Cases in Patients Over 50 Rising

MONDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of patients over age 50 with newly diagnosed HIV grew significantly from 1992 to 2004 and warrants greater attention in the design of HIV prevention educational programs, researchers report in the September issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Drop in Platelets Linked to Later HIV-Related Dementia

MONDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-infected patients tend to have a drop in the number of circulating platelets before developing HIV-associated dementia, according to results from a prospective cohort study published in the September issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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HIV Patients Feel Stigmatized by Health Care Providers

THURSDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Low-income patients with HIV may feel stigmatized by health care providers, which may prevent them from receiving an optimal level of care, according to the results of a study published in the September issue of AIDS Patient Care and STDs.

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HIV Protease Inhibitors Can Also Kill Cancer Cells

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Clinically approved HIV protease inhibitors such as nelfinavir are effective in killing many types of cancer cells, including drug-resistant cancers, according to a report in the Sept. 1 issue of Clinical Cancer Research.

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Physician's Briefing