New Paint Shows Germ-Fighting Potential

It may thwart hospital 'superbugs,' viruses and mold, scientists say

Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional.

SATURDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) A new antimicrobial paint kills disease-causing bacteria, mold, fungi and viruses, said the U.S. scientists who created the product.

They claim their paint, which can be used in homes, businesses and health-care settings, shows special promise for fighting so-called "superbugs," antibiotic-resistant microbes that are found in hospitals and cause about 88,000 deaths each year in the United States.

The paint contains a new antimicrobial polymer with a type of N-halamine, a bleach-like substance that kills germs. The polymer has no negative effects on the quality of latex paints. Tests showed that it kills a wide range of disease-causing microbes, including those that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, Yuyu Sun and Zhengbing Cao, the South Dakota-based researchers who developed the paint, said in a news release.

The scientists added that the paint retains its antimicrobial properties for extended periods and is easily "recharged" using a simple chlorination process.

The study appears in the current issue of Materials & Interfaces.

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more about antibiotic resistance.

SOURCE: American Chemical Society, news release

--

Last Updated: