Egg Donors Sought for Survey

Researchers want to detail motivations, repercussions for these women

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FRIDAY, Sept. 17, 2004 (HealthDayNews) -- Women who have donated eggs are being asked to take part in an online survey for a national study being conducted by University of Washington researchers.

The study is designed to discover what motivated these women to become egg donors and to determine what, if any, physical or psychological effects they experienced after they donated eggs to help themselves or other women become pregnant.

To be eligible for the survey, women must have donated eggs prior to May 2001. The survey includes 80 questions and can be completed in about 30 minutes.

"In this era of using technology to assist in reproduction, it is important to understand the consequences of this technology," Nancy Kenney, an associate professor of psychology and women's studies, said in a prepared statement.

"There have been many studies on the efficacy of reproduction using donated eggs and on the health of children born from this procedure, but women who donated eggs have been generally ignored. No one knows what has happened physically and emotionally to these women. It is important to understand their experience so that adjustments can be made to the assisted reproduction technology system if they are necessary," Kenney said.

Women who would like more information about the study can e-mail eggdonor@u.washington.edu.

More information

Resolve: The National Infertility Association has more about egg donation.

SOURCE: University of Washington, news release, September 2004

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