Infertility Tied to Male Breast Cancer Risk

Breast cancer risk linked to male-origin infertility; risk also up for men who have not fathered any children

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WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The risk for breast cancer is increased for men who are infertile and have not fathered children, according to a study published online May 17 in Breast Cancer Research.

Anthony J. Swerdlow, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the Institute of Cancer Research in London, and colleagues assessed the relationship between the risk for breast cancer in men and infertility and number of children. The analysis included 1,998 incident cases from 2005 to 2017 and 1,597 male controls.

The researchers found that the risk for breast cancer was statistically significantly associated with male-origin infertility but not if a couple's infertility had been diagnosed as of origin from the female partner. Higher risk was seen for men who had not fathered any children versus men who were fathers. These associations were significant for invasive tumors but not for in situ tumors.

"The causes of breast cancer in men are largely unknown, partly because it is rare and partly because previous studies have been small," a coauthor said in a statement. "The evidence presented in our study suggests that the association of infertility and breast cancer should be confirmed with further research, and future investigations are needed into the potential underlying factors, such as hormone imbalances."

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