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August 2010 Briefing - Internal Medicine

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Internal Medicine for August 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Blood Pressure-Lowering Diet May Reduce CHD Risk

TUESDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- In individuals with prehypertension or stage-1 hypertension, a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy, and low in fats and cholesterol appears to reduce the long-term risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a study published online Aug. 31 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Diverse Veggie Intake May Lower Lung Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a variety of vegetables and fruits may reduce the risk of lung cancer in current smokers, according to research published online Aug. 31 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Costs of Vehicle-Related Injury Exceeded $99 Billion in 2005

TUESDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- In 2005, motor vehicle crashes in the United States resulted in more than 3.7 million deaths or injuries requiring medical care, as well as loss of productivity and medical costs reaching nearly $100 billion, according to research published in the August issue of Traffic Injury Prevention.

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No Benefit Seen for Vitamin Use With Colon Cancer Chemo

TUESDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with stage III colon cancer, the use of multivitamins during and after adjuvant chemotherapy is not associated with a lower recurrence rate or improved survival, according to a study published online Aug. 30 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Somatic Depression Symptoms Show Heart Risk Link

TUESDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Somatic symptoms of depression appear to more strongly predict cardiovascular events than cognitive depressive symptoms in individuals with stable coronary heart disease (CHD), according to research published in the Sept. 7 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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AHA/ASA Stroke Program Likely Applicable Outside U.S.

MONDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Get With the Guidelines-Stroke program (GWTG-Stroke) may be useful for assessing and improving the quality of stroke care and outcomes outside the United States, according to research published online Aug. 30 in Circulation.

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Black Race Independent Predictor of Stent Thrombosis

MONDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Black race is a distinct risk factor for developing stent thrombosis (ST) after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation, according to a study published online Aug. 30 in Circulation.

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Exercise Alters Pain Sensitivity in Veterans With Chronic Pain

MONDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Veterans of the first Gulf War (GVs) with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) appear to be more sensitive to heat-pain stimuli after acute exercise, according to research published in the August issue of the Journal of Pain.

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Post-Op Delirium Linked to Cerebral Vascular Disease

MONDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Delirium after spinal fusion in elderly patients is more common in those with a history of cerebral vascular disease, low hemoglobin and hematocrit levels after surgery, and poor nutrition, according to a study in the Aug. 15 issue of Spine.

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Opioid Addiction Often Begins With Legal Prescriptions

FRIDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Many individuals who seek treatment for opioid dependence begin using the drugs legally but later obtain them from illicit sources, according to a study in the June issue of the Journal of Addiction Medicine.

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Multiple Sclerosis Program Improves Drug Adherence

FRIDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A specialty care management program for multiple sclerosis (MS) patients may improve medication compliance and reduce both MS-related hospitalizations and MS-related medical costs, though total costs may still increase over time, according to research published in the August issue of Multiple Sclerosis.

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CDC's Revised Influenza Death Estimates Show Wide Variation

FRIDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- From 1976 through 2007, the number of annual influenza-related deaths in the United States ranged from 3,349 to 48,614, according to a report published in the Aug. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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P2Y12 Inhibitors Reduce Post-PCI Risk of Death

THURSDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- New P2Y12 inhibitors are associated with improved outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) compared with clopidogrel, and appear especially beneficial for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients, according to research published online Aug. 25 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Physicians' Religious Views Linked to Care Decisions

THURSDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Non-religious physicians are more likely than religious physicians to make decisions that could hasten the end of patients' lives, and are also more likely to discuss these types of decisions with patients, according to research published online Aug. 25 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Statin Benefits Those With High hsCRP, Intermediate CVD Risk

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Rosuvastatin may reduce the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in men and women with normal cholesterol but elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels who are at intermediate risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to research published online Aug. 24 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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FDA Warns Against Use of Foot Tanner

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning to consumers about the possible risk of ultraviolet overdose with a portable foot tanning device due to shortcomings in labeling and manufacturing.

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Diabetes Drugs Equal in Risk for Adverse Heart Events

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The diabetes drugs rosiglitazone and pioglitazone (Avandia and Actos, respectively) appear to be evenly matched when it comes to the risk for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), acute heart failure (AHF), and mortality in patients taking the drugs, according to research published online Aug. 24 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Elevated CRP Has Robust Link to Higher A-Fib Risk

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) are robustly associated with a higher risk of atrial fibrillation, but elevated levels don't necessarily increase the risk, according to research published in the Aug. 31 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Black Women With Lupus Develop CVD at Younger Age

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Black women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are hospitalized for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and die from them at younger ages than female SLE patients of other races and ethnic groups, according to a study published online May 6, ahead of the print issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Moderate Drinking Linked to Lower Mortality Risk in Seniors

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, moderate drinking is associated with lower mortality risk than abstention, heavy drinking, and perhaps even light drinking, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Cognitive Therapy Improves Adult ADHD Symptoms

TUESDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive behavioral therapy may be an effective complementary treatment for adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) for whom medication falls short of relieving their symptoms, according to research published in the Aug. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Antiherpetic Antiviral Drugs Not Linked to Birth Defects

TUESDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to the antiviral drugs acyclovir and valacyclovir during the first trimester of pregnancy is not associated with a higher risk of major birth defects, according to a study in the Aug. 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Rectal Cancer on the Increase in Younger People

TUESDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of rectal cancer and rectosigmoid cancer in younger patients appears to have been increasing in recent decades, according to research published online Aug. 23 in Cancer.

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Virus May Be Associated With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

TUESDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found evidence of the murine leukemia virus (MLV) in a group of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS); their findings were published online Aug. 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Antihypertensive Drugs Tied to Pressor Responses

MONDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Commonly used antihypertensive drugs cause pressor responses fairly frequently, particularly in patients with low renin levels who receive β-blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, according to a study published online Aug. 19 in the American Journal of Hypertension.

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Health Costs Likely High in LBP Patients With High Disability

MONDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Low back pain (LBP) patients with high levels of disability have an increased likelihood of incurring high health care costs, and depression appears to play an important role in back pain patients' direct health care utilization, according to research published in the Aug. 15 issue of Spine.

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High A1C Tied to Heart Failure in Those Without Diabetes

MONDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Among middle-aged people without diabetes, elevated hemoglobin A1C is associated with risk of later heart failure, indicating that chronic hyperglycemia even before diabetes development may be a risk factor for heart failure, according to research published in the August issue of Diabetes.

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Low Levels of Tobacco Smoke Exposure Tied to Lung Disease

FRIDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals exposed to even low levels of tobacco smoke may be at increased risk for developing lung diseases, according to a study published online Aug. 6 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Elderly Likely to Under- or Overestimate Risk of Falling

FRIDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly individuals often underestimate or overestimate their risk of falling, and the disparities between their perceived and physiological risk are associated with psychological measures and have a strong influence on the likelihood of actually falling, according to a study published online Aug. 19 in BMJ.

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Leafy Green Vegetables May Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

FRIDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Higher daily consumption of green leafy vegetables can significantly reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a meta-analysis published Aug. 19 in BMJ.

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MRSA Infection Risk Found Higher Among Illicit Drug Users

FRIDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who use illicit drugs are three times more likely to acquire USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia than patients who don't use illicit drugs, according to a study conducted in veterans hospitals and reported in the September issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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High BP Plus Binge Drinking Tied to Increased Cardio Risk

FRIDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Korean males with grade 3 hypertension who engage in binge or heavy binge drinking are at substantially increased risk of cardiovascular mortality, even after adjusting for total alcohol consumption, according to a study published online Aug. 19 in Stroke.

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Sham, Real Acupuncture Result in Similar Pain Relief in OA

THURSDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Traditional Chinese acupuncture (TCA) is no better than sham acupuncture for patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, but patients whose acupuncturist communicates positive expectations have better pain reduction and satisfaction than patients whose acupuncturist has a neutral communication style, according to a study in the September issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Lifestyle Choices Affect Headache Frequency in Teens

THURSDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Low physical activity, smoking, and being overweight all significantly increase the odds of recurrent headache in adolescents, according to research published online Aug. 18 in Neurology.

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Tai Chi Shows Benefits in Treating Fibromyalgia

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Tai chi may be useful in treating fibromyalgia, according to research published in the Aug. 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Fatty Acids Beneficial for Metabolic Syndrome Patients

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Low-fat, high-complex carbohydrate diets are often recommended to lower risk for metabolic syndrome (MetS), but this regimen may raise blood lipids; the addition of long-chain (n-3) fatty acids may help alleviate this problem in MetS patients, according to research published online July 14 in the Journal of Nutrition.

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Steroids in Cadaveric Donor Don't Benefit Kidney Recipient

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Treating deceased kidney donors with corticosteroids in advance of kidney harvesting does not reduce the incidence or duration of acute renal failure (ARF) after transplantation in organ recipients, according to a study in the Aug. 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Cancer Care Differs by Race, Language, and Health Status

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Patients' ratings and reports of care for lung or colorectal cancers differ significantly by language, health status, and race, with Asian and Pacific Islander patients and those in worse health reporting worse care experiences, according to research published online Aug. 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Moderate Chocolate Intake Tied to Lower Heart Failure Risk

TUESDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Regular, moderate chocolate consumption is linked to a lower rate of heart failure hospitalization or death, but no protective association is seen in individuals consuming one or more servings of chocolate daily, according to a study published online Aug. 16 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

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Simple Assessment Score May Predict Critical Care Needs

TUESDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A prediction score based on out-of-hospital factors may be useful for stratifying non-trauma patients and predicting who will develop critical illness during hospitalization, according to research published in the Aug. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Review Focuses on New Drug Class in the Treatment of Gout

TUESDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Febuxostat, part of a new drug class to treat gout, may be useful for patients intolerant to long-established gout medication, but clinicians should be sure they are properly using existing therapies first, according to a review published online Aug. 17 in The Lancet.

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FDA Proposes Withdrawal of Approval for Midodrine

TUESDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- In the absence of post-approval trials demonstrating the clinical benefits of midodrine hydrochloride (ProAmatine), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a proposal to withdraw approval of the drug.

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Disclosing Medical Errors May Cut Malpractice Claims, Costs

TUESDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A malpractice claims management system implemented in Michigan that mandates full disclosure of medical errors accompanied by a monetary offer to the patient has resulted in a reduced claims rate, fewer lawsuits, faster time to resolution of claims, and lower costs, according to a study in the Aug. 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Quality of Care Lackluster for Patients With Hepatitis C Virus

TUESDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Nationwide, the quality of care provided to patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is substantially below proposed Medicare standards, though care that involves both specialists and generalists is associated with the highest quality, according to a study in the Aug. 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Red Meat Linked to Increased Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Higher intakes of nuts, fish, and poultry are associated with a significantly lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), but high intake of red meat and high-fat dairy is significantly associated with an increased risk of CHD, according to research published online Aug. 16 in Circulation.

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Bariatric Surgery for Diabetes Patients Cuts Medication, Costs

MONDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In type 2 diabetes patients, bariatric surgery is associated with dramatic reductions in the use of diabetes medications and in annual health care costs in the years after surgery, according to research published in the August issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Estrogen Alone Does Not Increase Lung Cancer Risk

MONDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women treated with estrogen alone do not have increased incidence of, or mortality from, lung cancer, according to research published online Aug. 13 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Quality Indicators Established for Multiple Sclerosis Care

MONDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Using rigorous methodology, a team of researchers has developed a list of quality indicators for measuring the health care of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a research paper published in the August issue of Multiple Sclerosis.

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Rimonabant Trial Stopped Early Due to Suicide Risk

FRIDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A study evaluating the cardiovascular outcomes related to rimonabant, a weight loss drug, was discontinued due to concerns regarding the risk of suicide associated with the drug, according to a report in the Aug. 14 issue of The Lancet.

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FDA: Aseptic Meningitis Risk Related to Lamictal Use

FRIDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a drug safety communication to warn that the seizure and bipolar disorder medication Lamictal (lamotrigine) can cause aseptic meningitis. The FDA is revising the Warnings and Precautions section of the drug label as well as the patient Medication Guide to include this information.

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1,097 Foodborne Outbreaks Occurred in U.S. in 2007

FRIDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- In 2007, nearly 1,100 foodborne outbreaks were reported in the United States, resulting in 21,244 cases of illness and 18 deaths, according to data published in the Aug. 13 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Decline Seen in Peptic Ulcer Disease Hospitalizations

FRIDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection have decreased substantially since 1998, according to an analysis in the September issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Cholesterol Levels Vary Across the Menstrual Cycle

FRIDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Serum lipid levels are associated with endogenous estrogen levels in menstruating women, and vary throughout the cycle, according to research published online June 9 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

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Rheumatoid Arthritis Gets New Classification System

FRIDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A revised system of classification for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may allow for earlier identification of the disease, earlier treatment, and ultimately better patient outcomes; the new system has been published in the September issues of the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases and Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Cell Phones Offer New Tool in Infectious Disease Surveillance

THURSDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A survey invitation sent to hundreds of thousands of cell phone subscribers in Mexico during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic demonstrates a new model for enlisting new technology for surveillance during outbreaks of infectious disease, according to a letter published in the September issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Younger Patients Benefit Less From Medicare

THURSDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Medicare does not appear as effective in meeting the health care needs of beneficiaries younger than 65 with disabilities as it is for beneficiaries age 65 and older, according to research published online Aug. 12 in Health Affairs.

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Patients Prefer Tablet Over Chocolate for BP Control

THURSDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Chocolate may be more effective than placebo at controlling blood pressure, but it seems patients would rather swallow a capsule than eat a chocolate bar, according to a letter published Aug. 10 in BMJ.

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Culturally Guided Diet Changes May Help Diabetes Prevention

THURSDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Identification of dietary trends, such as levels of carbohydrate, protein, and fiber intake, in African-Americans without diabetes, with pre-diabetes, and with diabetes could potentially guide culturally-targeted diabetes prevention and treatment methods, according to research published in the Spring issue of Ethnicity & Disease.

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Lithium Carbonate Not Found to Be Beneficial for ALS

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Lithium carbonate is ineffective as a treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and has a high frequency of adverse effects, according to research published online Aug. 11 in Neurology.

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Antibiotic Use Rose With Better Drug Coverage After Part D

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The use of antibiotics in older adults increased after their drug coverage improved with the implementation of the Medicare Part D drug benefit, and Part D has been linked to a drop in beneficiaries' out-of-pocket expenses on drugs, especially if they previously lacked drug coverage, according to research published in the Aug. 9/23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Some Adversity Exposure May Improve Back Pain Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Among individuals with chronic back pain (CBP), those with some lifetime exposure to adverse events report less impairment and health care use than those with a high level of exposure to adverse events or no exposure to adversity, according to a study in the September issue of PAIN.

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Modest Visceral Fat Gain Decreases Endothelial Function

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Even modest gains in visceral fat are associated with decreased endothelial function in healthy young adults, according to research published in the Aug. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Travel Linked to Spread of Antibiotic Resistance Gene

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A gene that creates antibiotic resistance has been found to be widespread in Enterobacteriaceae of patients in India and Pakistan and in patients from the United Kingdom who have visited India or Pakistan for elective surgery; this could indicate an emerging public health threat, according to research published online Aug. 11 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Coagulopathy Often Untreated in Brain Hemorrhage Patients

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In many patients with symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) associated with thrombolytic therapy for acute stroke, coagulopathy goes untreated, and often, patients experience continued bleeding after diagnosis, according to research published in the August issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Patients, Doctors Often Have Communication Discrepancies

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalized patients and physicians may have differing beliefs regarding patients' knowledge and aspects of their care, suggesting a need for improved patient-physician communication, according to research published in the Aug. 9/23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Simplified Tool Assesses Death Risk in Pulmonary Embolism

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A simplified version of the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI) has clinical utility and prognostic accuracy that is similar to those of the original index, according to a study published in the Aug. 9/23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Consumer Drug Information Shows Areas of Concern

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Consumer medication information (CMI) accompanying prescription drugs dispensed at retail pharmacies is often subject to concerns about format, comprehensibility, and excessive length, according to research published in the Aug. 9/23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Visits to ERs Increasing; Medicaid May Be Playing Role

TUESDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of emergency department visits increased during a recent 10-year period, with findings suggesting that emergency departments are growing in importance as a safety net for adults with Medicaid and other underserved patients, according to research published in the Aug. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Health Care-Linked MRSA Rate Shows Recent Decline

TUESDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In a recent four-year period, rates of invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections declined in patients thought to have hospital-onset infections and those thought to have health care-associated infections that began in the community, according to research published in the Aug. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Bisphosphonate Exposure Not Linked With Esophageal Cancer

TUESDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- There appears to be no association between oral bisphosphonate use and risk of esophageal or gastric cancer, according to research published in the Aug. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Some Vena Cava Filters Prone to Fracture, Embolization

TUESDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- There is a high rate of fracture and embolization with potentially devastating sequelae associated with two types of Bard filters, according to research published online Aug. 9 in the Archives of Internal Medicine. In addition, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is recommending that physicians in care of patients with retrievable inferior vena cava filters consider removing the filters as soon as protection from pulmonary embolism is no longer necessary.

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Finasteride Use Up in VHA System but Not for Prevention

TUESDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Finasteride prescriptions in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) increased between 2000 and 2005, but the increase probably was not due to doctors prescribing it for prostate cancer chemoprevention, according to research published online Aug. 10 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Warning System May Reduce Orders for Inappropriate Meds

TUESDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The implementation of a computerized provider order entry (CPOE) drug warning system can reduce orders for potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in hospitalized older patients, according to a study published in the Aug. 9/23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Medication Compliance Three Months After Stroke Is Poor

TUESDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one quarter of stroke patients discontinue at least one of their prescribed secondary prevention medications within three months after hospital discharge, leaving this group at higher risk of another stroke, according to research published online Aug. 9 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Vertebroplasty Found Beneficial for Fracture Pain Control

TUESDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Pain control with percutaneous vertebroplasty is superior to pain control with conservative management for acute osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures, according to research published online Aug. 10 in The Lancet.

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Even With Normal BMI, Larger Waist Tied to Higher Mortality

MONDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Increased waist circumference is associated with a higher mortality risk in normal weight, overweight, and obese individuals, according to research published in the Aug. 9/23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Boceprevir Can Improve Response Rate in Hepatitis C

MONDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of boceprevir, an NS3 protease inhibitor, to the standard regimen of peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin for patients with treatment-naive genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C infection can nearly double the sustained virological response (SVR) rate, according to a study published online Aug. 9 in The Lancet.

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Deep Brain Stimulation May Hold Promise in Alzheimer's

MONDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The use of deep brain stimulation may provide benefits in patients with Alzheimer's disease by influencing pathological brain activity, according to research published online Aug. 4 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Coping Style, Depression Linked to Foot Ulcer Outcomes

FRIDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Depression and a confrontational coping style may be associated with lack of healing of diabetic foot ulcers, according to research published in the August issue of Diabetologia.

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Two Surveillance Systems in Haiti Monitor Disease Trends

FRIDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Two national surveillance systems established in Haiti after the magnitude-7.0 earthquake on Jan. 12 aim to enable government and community organizations to better monitor disease trends and coordinate relief efforts, according to two reports published in the Aug. 6 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Podiatric Care Reduces Amputation Risk in Diabetes

FRIDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Foot amputation or hospitalization resulting from foot ulcers in diabetes patients can be prevented or delayed with timely care from a podiatrist, and increased podiatry use by diabetes patients may result in substantial health care cost savings, according to research presented at the annual scientific meeting of the American Podiatric Medical Association, held from July 15 to 18 in Seattle.

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2008 Polytobacco Use Rate at 2.5 Percent in U.S. Adults

FRIDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In 2008, the rate of polytobacco use (mostly cigarettes in combination with other tobacco products) was 2.5 percent among U.S. adults, with prevalence highest among men, young adults, single adults, low-income households, and those with lower levels of education, according to a report published in the Aug. 6 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Mortality Risk Much Higher for Elderly People With Dementia

FRIDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly people with dementia have a much higher mortality risk than peers without the condition, but the risk of dementia may be reducible by addressing risk factors such as diet, preventable disease, and mental health, according to a pair of studies published Aug. 5 in BMJ.

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Rosiglitazone May Help Maintain Cognition in Diabetes Patients

FRIDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Adding rosiglitazone to the treatment for type 2 diabetes may help protect against cognitive decline in older patients with mild cognitive impairment, according to a study in the August issue of Diabetes Care.

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Omentectomy Not Linked to Better Metabolic Function

FRIDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In obese patients, surgical removal of the omentum, either alone or along with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, doesn't improve metabolic function, according to research published in the August issue of Gastroenterology.

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Substance Use Among Hispanics Below U.S. Average

THURSDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol and illicit drug use is lower among Hispanic-Americans than the national average; nonetheless, their treatment needs for alcohol are slightly higher than the national average, according to a new report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.

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Smoking Tied to Increased Risk for Breast Abscesses

THURSDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of developing primary or recurring breast abscesses increases with smoking, and subareolar breast abscesses may be associated with nipple piercing, according to research published in the July issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

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Aerobic Training for Asthma Shows Psychosocial Benefits

THURSDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- In adults with asthma, an aerobic training program may reduce anxiety, depression, and asthma symptoms and improve health-related quality of life, according to research published in the August issue of Chest.

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Diabetes Education for PCPs Improves Disease Management

THURSDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes patients from clinics where primary care physicians (PCPs) participate in a program of computer-based diabetes case studies improve glucose control better than patients from clinics where PCPs do not undergo the learning intervention, according to a study in the August issue of Diabetes Care.

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Diabetes Linked to Reduced Pulmonary Function

THURSDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes, without the presence of overt pulmonary disease, is linked to a small but significant degree of pulmonary function impairment in a restrictive pattern, according to research published in the August issue of Chest.

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Approach in Different Settings Leads to Similar OSA Outcomes

THURSDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep-laboratory diagnosis and initiation of therapy for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) doesn't lead to better four-week outcomes compared to home-based diagnosis and treatment, according to research published in the August issue of Chest.

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Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Risk Higher With Chronic Hepatitis

THURSDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is associated with an increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), according to research published online Aug. 4 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Researchers Test Three Agents for Hereditary Angioedema

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found C1 inhibitor concentrate, ecallantide (a recombinant plasma kallikrein inhibitor), and icatibant (a selective bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist) effective in the management and relief of symptoms of hereditary angioedema, according to three studies published in the Aug. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Antiepileptics Don't Raise Risk of Suicide in Epilepsy Patients

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Use of antiepileptic drugs isn't linked to a higher risk of suicide-related events in patients with epilepsy, but it is linked to higher risk in patients with depression and those without epilepsy, depression, or bipolar disorder, according to research published in the Aug. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Rural Collaborative Depression Care May Not be Cost-Effective

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Rural clinic-based collaborative interventions for depression delivered via telemedicine are more costly in terms of quality-adjusted life year (QALY) ratios than similar programs delivering collaborative depression care in urban areas, according to research published in the August issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Quality-Adjusted Life Years Lost Due to Obesity Swells

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) lost among U.S. adults as the result of obesity more than doubled from 1993 to 2008, a period during which the nation's obesity prevalence increased by 89.9 percent, according to a report published online Aug. 3 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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U.S. Obesity Prevalence Among Adults Increased in 2009

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In 2009, no U.S. state met the Healthy People 2010 adult obesity prevalence target of 15 percent, and the number of states with an obesity prevalence ≥30 increased from zero in 2000 to nine in 2009, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Vital Signs report published Aug. 3 in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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B Vitamins Do Not Prevent Vascular Events After Stroke

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Supplementation with folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 is safe but does not appear to reduce the incidence of major vascular events in patients who have experienced a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack, according to a study published online Aug. 4 in The Lancet Neurology.

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FDA: Nimodipine Should Never Be Administered Intravenously

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is reminding health care professionals that nimodipine should never be administered intravenously but only given by mouth or through a feeding or nasogastric tube, as intravenous administration may lead to cardiac arrest, severe decreases in blood pressure, other cardiac adverse events, or death.

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Industry-Funded Clinical Trials Yield More Positive Outcomes

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Drug clinical trials supported by industry are more likely to produce favorable results than trials supported by government or nonprofit/nonfederal organizations, and they are less likely to be published within two years of the study being completed, according to research published in the Aug. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Use of Some Common Drugs May Lower PSA Levels

TUESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), statins, or thiazide diuretics can significantly lower tested levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), according to research published online Aug. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Fever Alone Unreliable Indicator of H1N1 Infection

MONDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Standard diagnostic criteria used for the diagnosis of 2009 H1N1 influenza infection, based on the presence of fever, may fail to identify patients with the disease, and respiratory symptoms may be more reliable indicators, according to research published in the August issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Increasing Weight, Waist Move Impaired Glucose to Diabetes

MONDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Increases in both weight and waist circumference in those who already have impaired fasting glucose (IFG) are significantly related to incidence of type 2 diabetes, with an enlarging waist being particularly risky for those with a lower body mass index (BMI), according to research published in the August issue of Diabetes Care.

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Oral Antidiabetic Agents Usually Drop A1C 1.5 Percent or Less

MONDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Oral antidiabetic (OAD) agents generally result in a maximum 1.5 percent drop in A1C levels, with sulfonylureas and thiazolidinediones having a slightly more beneficial effect than other classes of oral agents, according to research published in the August issue of Diabetes Care.

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