See What HealthDay Can Do For You
Contact Us

March 2009 Briefing - Internal Medicine

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Internal Medicine for March 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Safe Practice Scores Do Not Add Up to Fewer Patient Deaths

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- In hospitals, higher self-reported scores for improvements in safe practices do not correlate with reduced mortality rates, researchers report in the April 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Little Clinical Evidence to Support Bed Bug Treatments

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Although bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) have been associated with dozens of human diseases and their bites are treated with a range of drugs, there is no clinical trial-based evidence for the efficacy of treatments, and there is little evidence that they are communicable disease vectors, according to a review published in the April 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Housing for Homeless Alcoholics May Reduce Public Burden

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Health care use and costs for chronically homeless people with severe alcohol problems are substantially reduced when they are provided housing without the precondition of abstinence from alcohol, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lower Cancer Risk Seen in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with multiple sclerosis have an overall lower cancer risk, which does not appear to be due to heredity, according to the results of a study published in the March 31 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Urges More Clinical Research on Gynecologic Testing

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- While professional guidelines call for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing in the follow-up of treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), there is insufficient clinical research to guide the clinician in the selection of the test to use, according to a report in the April issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Staff Education Can Help Reduce Elective Labor Inductions

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Staff education and more rigorous enforcement of guidelines for labor induction can reduce the number of unwarranted inductions and lower the cesarean birth rate for first-time births, researchers report in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Full Text

Sample of Obese Subjects Led Very Sedentary Lives

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- In a small sample of morbidly obese individuals, their extremely sedentary lifestyles fell far short of common activity guidelines for cardiovascular protection, according to research published online March 19 in Clinical Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Protein Seen to Play Role in Herpes Reactivation

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Expression of a virion protein called VP16 appears to be necessary for herpes simplex virus to exit its latent state, according to research published in the March issue of PLoS Pathogens.

Full Text

Obese Women Face High First-Time Pregnancy Risks

MONDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Obese women who are pregnant for the first time have an elevated risk of preterm birth, cesarean section delivery and preeclampsia, according to a report in the April issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Seated Postures Linked to Different Muscle Activities

MONDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- The use of electromyography provides helpful details regarding the regional muscle activity that occurs during three sagittally balanced seated postures, according to research published in the March 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Depression Risk Linked to Cortical Thinning

MONDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- People with a family history of depression are more likely to develop the illness if they have loss of brain cortex matter, according to research published online March 27 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Social Isolation Worsens Stroke Outcomes in Mouse Study

MONDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Mice housed in isolation are more likely to experience major ischemic damage and die of a stroke than their socially housed cohorts, according to research published online March 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Home-Based Training and Therapy Extend Life in Elderly

MONDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Teaching elderly and infirm people how to safely perform daily activities and achieve personal functional goals can markedly extend their lives, according to a report in the March issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Treatment Eases Symptoms in Cervical Stenosis Patients

MONDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- The use of the prostaglandin E1 derivative limaprost alfadex may provide symptomatic relief in patients with cervical spinal canal stenosis (CSCS), according to research published in the March 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Children's Lung Function Linked to Genetic Variants

MONDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- In children, variants in GST mu genes are associated with decreased lung capacity and small airway flow, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Romantic Love Can Be Intense and Long-Lasting

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to what has been widely believed, long-term relationships don't necessarily kill romantic love, and many couples can maintain an exciting relationship that is positively associated with marital satisfaction, mental health and overall well-being, according to the results of a study published in the March issue of the Review of General Psychology.

Full Text

Cancer Patients Often Not Involved in Treatment Decisions

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with incurable cancer, fewer than half are involved in the decision-making process concerning the limitation of life-prolonging treatment, according to a study published online ahead of print March 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Reduced Platelet Reactivity After Adjunctive Cilostazol

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing coronary stenting who develop high post-treatment platelet reactivity (HPPR), adjunctive cilostazol reduces platelet aggregation better than maintenance clopidogrel, researchers report in the March 31 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

NHLBI Discontinues Hypertonic Saline Trial

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S.-Canadian trial to assess in-ambulance administration of a hypertonic saline solution to trauma patients in shock from severe bleeding has been halted due to lack of a survival benefit, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) announced on March 26.

More Information

Low-Income Men May Not Grasp Prostate Cancer Terms

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Low literacy levels among medically underserved men highlight the need to consider literacy and use non-medical language for prostate cancer education efforts and outcomes measures, according to a study published online ahead of print March 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Post-Exercise Heart Rhythm Predicts Cardiovascular Risk

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Visible beat-to-beat alterations in cardiac repolarization known as T-wave alternans (TWA) predict the risk of cardiovascular disease and death in patients with coronary artery disease, according to a study in the March 31 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Drinking Very Hot Tea May Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking tea before it has cooled down slightly is associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer, according to study findings published online March 26 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

ACCF/AHA Update Covers Heart Failure in Adults

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Updated American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association guidelines on heart failure in adults include new recommendations for hospitalized patients, and the guidelines were published online March 26 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text

Aspirin May Protect Against Cancer

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- People who take aspirin for vascular protection have less incidence of cancer, but only after 10 years of taking the drug, indicating that it may have a protective effect against cancer, according to a review published online March 27 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lung Hypertension Common in Heart Failure Patients

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Pulmonary hypertension is common in patients with preserved ejection fraction heart failure, and pulmonary artery systolic pressure may be effective in diagnosing heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and predicting the risk of death, researchers report in the March 31 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Most US Adults Should Reduce Sodium Intake

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 70 percent of U.S. adults are in groups at high risk of hypertension and should reduce their sodium intake to less than a teaspoon of salt a day, officials from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report in the March 27 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More Information

Weight Gain Between Births Raises Cesarean Risk

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have developed gestational diabetes in a prior pregnancy and have gained more than 10 pounds of weight between pregnancies are at increased risk for cesarean delivery of subsequent babies, according to a report published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Omega-3s Linked to Prostate Cancer Protection

FRIDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- Higher intakes of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids were associated with a lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer, which appeared to be modified by a COX-2 single nucleotide polymorphism, according to research published online March 24 in Clinical Cancer Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Family Meals Help Teens Develop Healthy Eating Habits

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Family mealtimes in adolescence are associated with healthful eating habits later in life, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Same-Day IUD Insertion May Promote Contraception

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Offering women who seek walk-in pregnancy testing or emergency contraception same-day insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD) may be an effective strategy for promoting contraception, according to a report published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Tumor Suppressor Genes Linked to Bladder Cancer

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling may offer a potential treatment for invasive bladder cancer, according to research published in the March 15 issue of Genes & Development.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Light Alcohol Consumption Linked to β-Endorphin Release

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol consumption, up to moderate levels, may increase β-endorphin release in the brain and play a role in ethanol reward, according to research published online March 19 in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Mutant Thyroid Gene Linked to Aberrant Histone Modifications

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- A mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor associated with resistance to thyroid hormone is associated with aberrant histone modifications that increase expression of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), according to a study published online March 19 in Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Substantia Nigra Shows Role in Reinforcement Learning

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Neurons in the substantia nigra appear to play a key role in human reinforcement learning, according to research published online March 13 in Science.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Repair Defects Linked to Risk of Familial Colorectal Cancer

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of colorectal cancer in first-degree relatives of colorectal cancer patients increases if the tumors are defective in repairing their DNA and if patients developed disease early, but most of the excess risk cannot be accounted for by defects in known genes, according to research published online March 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Positional Vertigo Linked to Osteoporosis and Osteopenia

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- The dizziness-inducing condition known as benign positional vertigo is associated with osteopenia and osteoporosis, researchers report in the March 24 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Report Calls for Separate US Food Safety Agency

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- A dedicated agency for food safety is needed to combat food-related health threats, according to a report, Keeping America's Food Safe, produced by Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

More Information

Routine Tests Can Induce Stress Cardiomyopathy

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Routine procedures and tests using catecholamines and beta-receptor agonists can precipitate stress cardiomyopathy, according to study findings released online March 25 in advance of publication in the April 14 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text

Hundred Steps Per Minute May Be Good Fitness Goal

THURSDAY, March 26 (HealthDay News) -- Taking 3,000 steps in 30 minutes on most days of the week might be a good pace for people to follow to protect their health, according to research published online March 17 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Full Text

Electric Current Leak Can Trigger Defibrillator Shock

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- An electric current leak that is not noticeable under ordinary circumstances can trigger a serious shock in someone who has an implanted cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), according to a letter in the March 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Circumcision Lowers Risk of Sexually Transmitted Disease

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- In a study of Ugandan men, circumcision reduced both the incidence of herpes simplex virus (HSV-2) and the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV), two co-factors in HIV/AIDs, according to a report in the March 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cost Barriers Slow Adoption of Electronic Health Records

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Citing cost barriers, relatively few U.S. hospitals have adopted electronic health records, posing a major obstacle for policy makers who say health information technology is critical to the improvement of health care quality and cost-effectiveness, according to an article published online March 25 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial
Editorial

Childhood Soy Intake May Help Prevent Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- In Asian American women, high soy intake during childhood is associated with a significantly decreased breast cancer risk in adulthood, according to the results of a study published online March 24 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Low Cholesterol, Blood Pressure Show CAD Benefits

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), those with the lowest levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and systolic blood pressure had the slowest progression of coronary atherosclerosis, according to research published in the March 31 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Antibody Combination May Protect Against HIV

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Investigation into the immune response in slow-progressing patients with HIV indicates that a vaccine that elicits a variety of antibodies could be effective, according to research published online March 15 in Nature.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Men's Follow-Up Attendance Influenced by Trust in Doctor

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Men with testicular cancer are less likely to attend follow-up visits and adhere to medical advice if they feel that they do not have a satisfactory relationship with their doctor, according to study findings published online March 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Active Surveillance Safe for Some Prostate Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Active surveillance of certain prostate cancer patients is a safe and effective strategy for prevention of systemic progression of the disease, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text

Light Eating During Labor Not Linked to Adverse Effects

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- In selected patients, consumption of a light diet during labor has no effect on obstetric or neonatal outcomes and is not associated with an increased incidence of vomiting, according to research published online March 24 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

British Chemical Warfare Experiments Had Limited Impact

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Among British military veterans who were exposed to chemical warfare agents during 1941-1989 experiments at the Porton Down research facility, mortality and cancer morbidity rates are not significantly different from those of other veterans, according to two studies published online March 24 in BMJ.

Abstract - Venables
Full Text
Abstract - Carpenter
Full Text
Editorial

U.S. Emergency Care Access Varies Widely

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- While most people in the United States can get to an emergency department within a half-hour, there are geographic inequities that could impact medical outcomes in time-critical medical emergencies, such as heart attack, stroke or major trauma, according to a report in the Feb. 9 online edition of the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Patient Concerns Hamper Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain Control

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Many rheumatoid arthritis patients are reluctant to take pain medications and tolerate more pain than necessary as a result, researchers report in the March issue of the Journal of Pain.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

C-Reactive Protein Levels Associated With Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with increased risk of cancer and earlier death after cancer diagnosis, according to a report published online March 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text

Elevated Triglycerides Common Among U.S. Adults

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Among U.S. adults, hypertriglyceridemia is a common condition associated with physical inactivity, overweight or obesity. But the overwhelming majority of adults with hypertriglyceridemia are not receiving medical treatment for it, according to research published in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Americans Fear Chronic Disease Above All Else

WEDNESDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Although Americans fear chronic disease above debt, divorce or unemployment, their lifestyle choices put them at risk for diseases such as diabetes, according to a report released March 24 by the American Diabetes Association.

More Information

Genetic Heart Disease Often Deadly for Children

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- A genetic cardiomyopathy that strikes children is associated with serious heart dysfunction and often death, according to a report in the March 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Collaborative Care Improves Chronic Pain

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients who experience chronic pain, those who receive a collaborative approach to pain treatment have improvements in pain and depression severity compared with usual care, researchers report in the March 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Antibiotic Dressing Reduces Catheter-Related Infections

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- An antibiotic-impregnated catheter dressing reduces catheter-related infections better than standard dressings in critically ill patients, according to a report in the March 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Burden of Alzheimer's Disease Triples Health Costs

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- People aged 65 and older with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia make Medicare and Medicaid claims that are three times higher than those of their counterparts without the condition, according to a report, 2009 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures, released March 24 by the Alzheimer's Association.

Full Text

Pediatric Anesthesia Linked to Learning Disability Risk

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple early exposures to anesthesia may be an important risk factor for developing learning disabilities later in childhood, researchers report in the April issue of Anesthesiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Ovarian Cancer Screenings Show Low Positivity Rate

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- In older women, regular screening for ovarian cancer has a low positivity rate, suggesting that existing technology is not beneficial in the detection of early cancer, according to research published in the April issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Full Text
Editorial

Vitamin D Insufficiency Increasing in United States

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- About three out of four American adolescents and adults currently have insufficient levels of vitamin D, though oral vitamin D supplementation is effective in preventing fractures among older adults, according to two studies published in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Ginde
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Bischoff-Ferrari
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Smoking Linked to Risk of Acute, Chronic Pancreatitis

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking is independently associated with an increased risk of pancreatitis, according to study findings published in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Family History Linked to First Venous Thrombosis

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- A family history of venous thrombosis is independently associated with an up to quadrupled risk of a first venous thrombosis, according to a study published in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

High Meat Consumption Linked to Higher Death Risk

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- People who consume large amounts of red and processed meats have a higher risk of death, particularly from cancer and cardiovascular disease, according to a study in the March 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Intensive Glucose Control Spikes Mortality in Critically Ill

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Intensively controlling blood glucose in a study group of critically ill patients increased their mortality rate and hypoglycemia in comparison to a group receiving conventional glucose control, according to research reported online March 24 in advance of publication in the March 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Switching Anticonvulsant Drugs Cuts Cardiovascular Risk

TUESDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Switching to anticonvulsant drugs that don't activate cytochrome P450 enzymes can improve blood cholesterol levels and lower cardiovascular risk in epilepsy patients, according to research published online March 18 in the Annals of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Dyspepsia May Improve With Dietary Changes

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with functional dyspepsia may have improved symptoms when they eat smaller meals with lower fat content, according to a study published in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Amniocentesis Linked to Loss in Twin Pregnancies

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Women pregnant with twins who undergo amniocentesis may face a higher risk of pregnancy loss, according to research published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text

Fiber-Reinforced Cement Excels in Simulated Skull Repair

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Fiber-reinforced calcium phosphate bone cement (FRC) exhibited superior strength and structural integrity when compared with non-reinforced cement (NRC), according to a study in the March/April issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Reirradiation May Extend Life in Head and Neck Cancers

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- For some patients, reirradiation of recurrent head and neck cancer can extend life. But for those with comorbidities or organ dysfunction, such as feeding tube dependence, it is likely to offer only palliative support, according to a report in the March 16 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Socioeconomic Status Impacts Cancer Mortality Rates

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Despite Sweden's nationwide health care, people with higher socioeconomic status have lower mortality rates for two common hematologic cancers than those with lower socioeconomic status, according to a report in the March 16 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Feeling Lonely Affects Health Perception of Older Adults

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- As well as social isolation, feelings of loneliness and lack of social support are associated with a poorer self-perception of health among the elderly, according to a report published in the March issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients Should Be Tested

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment for breast cancer patients with metastatic disease is often changed when tests reveal discordance between the receptor status of primary and metastatic tumors, according to an article published online March 18 in the Annals of Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text

Nanotechnology May Aid in Earlier Anthrax Detection

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- A new test utilizing nanotechnology may be able to detect anthrax infection earlier than existing methods, according to a U.S. Food and Drug Administration announcement of research published in the March Clinical and Vaccine Immunology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Continuing to Smoke Worsens Pain in Lung Cancer

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer patients who continue to smoke even after their diagnosis are more likely to experience moderate to severe pain, researchers report in the March issue of the Journal of Pain.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rodent Studies Focus on Parkinson's Treatments

MONDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Dorsal column stimulation in animal models of Parkinson's disease points to a less-invasive method of improving function, and the use of optogenetics suggests a major target for deep brain stimulation in the disease, according to two studies published March 20 and online March 19 in Science.

Abstract - Fuentes
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Gradinaru
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Restenosis Similar With Stent

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Restenosis in patients with diabetes who have the TAXUS Liberte paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES) is similar to that for non-diabetic patients, according to a report in the March issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Immune Activation Renders Malaria Mosquitoes Resistant

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Gene silencing activates immune pathways in mosquitoes that carry malaria parasites and renders the mosquitoes resistant to infection, according to a report in the March issue of PLoS Pathogens.

Full Text

Aspirin Guidelines Updated by U.S. Preventive Services

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Before deciding whether to use aspirin to prevent heart attacks or strokes, clinicians should compare risk factors such as age, gender, diabetes, blood pressure, cholesterol levels and smoking against the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding, according to a report published in the March 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Research Seeks Infertility Cause in Transgenic Mice

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- In GnRHR-TAg transgenic mice, females may be infertile due to altered gonadotropin production and secretion before they even develop pituitary tumors, according to research published online March 12 in Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pregnant Women With Bowel Disease Face Higher Risks

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women with inflammatory bowel disease have an elevated risk of developing adverse pregnancy and maternal outcomes, according to research published in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Exercise Shows Endothelial Benefits After Heart Attack

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Both aerobic and resistance exercises appear effective in improving endothelial dysfunction in individuals after a first recent myocardial infarction, according to research published online March 16 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lifestyle Affects Survival in Head and Neck Cancers

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle factors, particularly smoking, can have a negative impact on survival for patients with head and neck cancers, according to a report in the March 16 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

TESTIN May Have Role in Head and Neck Cancer Survival

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Inactivation of the TESTIN gene may play a role in the survival odds of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, researchers report in the March issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Age, Diabetes May Affect Coronary Disease Treatments

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- In most patients with multivessel coronary disease who are suitable for either coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), long-term mortality is similar for either treatment. In diabetics and older patients, however, CABG may be associated with a significant survival advantage, according to an article published online March 20 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Botulinum Toxin Eases Symptoms of Frey Syndrome

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Frey syndrome, or gustatory sweating, who are given repeated treatments of botulinum toxin type A, experience less severe symptoms and a reduction in the area affected by the condition, according to a report published in the March issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Larval Debridement Therapy Effective for Leg Ulcers

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with sloughy or necrotic leg ulcers, debridement with larval therapy leads to similar outcomes at a similar cost as standard hydrogel therapy, but it may be associated with reduced time to debridement and more pain, according to two studies published March 19 in BMJ Online First.

Abstract - Dumville
Full Text
Abstract - Soares
Full Text

Google Searches May Lead to False Medical Information

FRIDAY, March 20 (HealthDay News) -- Google keyword searches may generate sponsored links to Web pages that contain misleading medical claims, according to a Views & Reviews article published online March 18 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pressure Ulcer Prevention Important in Surgical Patients

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses should consider every surgical patient "at-risk" for pressure ulcers and devise an individualized plan to mitigate that risk, according to an article in the March issue of the AORN Journal.

Abstract
Full Text

Illegal Immigrants Pose Ethical Dilemma for US Nurses

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Even though under federal law illegal immigrants in the United States for less than five years are not eligible for Medicaid, emergency department nurses have a range of ethical and legal obligations that require them to protect the safety of all patients regardless of their citizenship status, according to an article published in the March issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Depression Linked to Higher Heart Disease Risk

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is associated with a higher risk of developing coronary heart disease, which does not appear to be due to inflammation despite previous studies suggesting a link between inflammation and coronary heart disease, according to the results of a study published in the March 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Patients May Be OK With Watchful Waiting Over Tests

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Watchful waiting as opposed to ordering blood tests for patients with unexplained complaints was not associated with increased patient anxiety or decreased satisfaction, according to research published in the March/April Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Endometrial Polyp Diameter Points to Risk of Cancer

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Among postmenopausal women without abnormal bleeding who are incidentally diagnosed with polyps, abnormal histology is only significantly associated with polyps greater than 18 mm in diameter, according to research published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text

Lymphedema Burden High After Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Within two years after breast cancer treatment, a significant number of patients develop lymphedema, resulting in a greater risk of complications and increased treatment costs, according to a study published online March 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Imatinib Improves Survival After Gastrointestinal Tumor

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- A phase III trial of imatinib mesylate adjuvant therapy has shown that the drug is safe and increases the odds of recurrence-free survival after primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor resection, according to study findings published online March 19 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

NEJM Supports Medical Device Safety Act of 2009

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Passage of the Medical Device Safety Act of 2009 would nullify the U.S. Supreme Court's 2008 Riegel v. Medtronic decision -- which shielded medical device manufacturers from the potential consequences of failing to adequately disclose risks -- and significantly improve patient safety, according to an editorial published online March 18 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Editorial

Seniors' Choice on Medicare Part D Often Not Cost-Based

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors are not motivated simply by cost alone when choosing which Medicare Part D plan to enroll in, according to a report published in March by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

More Information

Moderate Drinking May Improve Bone Health

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- In men and postmenopausal women, moderate alcohol consumption may be beneficial to bone health. In men, however, consumption of more than two drinks per day of liquor is associated with significantly lower bone mineral density, according to a study published ahead of print Feb. 25 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Hippocampal Measures Predict Alzheimer's Progression

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- Although the rate of hippocampal atrophy may better distinguish individuals with mild cognitive impairment from controls, measures of whole brain volume may better discriminate Alzheimer's disease from mild cognitive impairment, according to research published in the March 17 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Fall Model May Not Be Reliable for Emergency Department

THURSDAY, March 19 (HealthDay News) -- The risk model that helps identify those at risk of falls in an inpatient setting may not be reliable in predicting those at risk in the emergency department, researchers report in the March issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Report Describes Immune Response to West Nile

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- A scientist who was accidentally infected with West Nile virus in the laboratory has an immune response that could be exploited for therapeutics, according to a case report in the March 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cytomegalovirus Vaccine Shows Promise in Women

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- A vaccine against cytomegalovirus (CMV) had a 50 percent efficacy in women of childbearing age, researchers report in the March 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Heart Failure Before 50 More Common in Blacks Than Whites

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- In a cohort of young black and white adults followed for two decades, the likelihood of heart failure before the age of 50 was 20 times higher in blacks than whites, according to research published in the March 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Hospital Quality Measure Inaccurate, May Increase Bias

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- A widely used hospital quality measure that compares mortality rates and takes into account the mix of cases is inaccurate and may increase the bias that case mix adjustment is intended to decrease, according to research published March 18 in BMJ Online First.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Budesonide Nasal Wash Not Linked to Adrenal Suppression

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- The use of budesonide as a nasal wash in adults with chronic rhinosinusitis appears to relieve symptoms without suppressing the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, according to research published in the March issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Over-Diagnosis Risk From Prostate Cancer Screening

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Screening for prostate cancer does not reduce the mortality rate after seven to 10 years' follow-up, according to study results released online March 18 in advance of publication in the March 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, while a second study in the same issue concludes that prostate-specific antigen-based screening does reduce mortality but runs the risk of over-diagnosis.

Abstract: Andriole et al
Full Text
Abstract: Schröder et al
Full Text
Editorial

Botulinum Drug for Wrinkles Found Well-Tolerated

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- The use of a botulinum toxin type A product (Reloxin) appeared to be well-tolerated and effective after repeated treatments, according to research published in the March/April Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Urinary Potassium Associated With Patients' Diet Quality

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Measurement of urinary potassium may be a simple way to detect a good or poor-quality diet, according to study findings published ahead of print Feb. 11 in the Journal of Nutrition.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Finds Imaging Exams of Pregnant Women on the Rise

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Imaging examinations of pregnant women at one Rhode Island medical center increased dramatically over a recent 10-year period, in particular the use of computed tomographic (CT) examinations, according to a report released online March 17 in advance of publication in the May issue of Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Score Accurately Estimates 10-Year Diabetes Risk

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- A score that uses medical data and does not require laboratory tests accurately estimates 10-year diabetes risk, according to research published March 17 in BMJ Online First.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Body Mass Index Alone Good Predictor of Mortality

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index (BMI) is a strong predictor of mortality risk both above and below the optimal weight range of 22.5-25 kg/m2, according to a report published online March 18 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Implantable Defibrillators Less Beneficial in Some Patients

WEDNESDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Implantable defibrillators in older patients with comorbidities or repeated hospitalizations for heart failure may produce only limited protection from sudden death, according to research published in the March 17 issue of CMAJ, the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Drug Ineffective in Treating Hereditary High Cholesterol

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Pactimibe treatment does not improve atherosclerosis and leads to an increase in the incidence of major cardiovascular events in patients with hereditary high cholesterol compared with placebo, according to a study in the March 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Religious More Likely to Use Life-Prolonging Care

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with advanced cancer who rely more strongly on religion to cope with illness are more likely to receive mechanical ventilation and intensive life-prolonging care at the end of life, according to a study in the March 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Narcolepsy Drug Has Potential for Abuse and Addiction

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Modafinil, a drug used to treat narcolepsy and psychiatric disorders, increases dopamine in the brain and may have the potential for abuse and addiction, according to a report published in the March 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medical Specialty Status Could Boost Nursing Home Docs

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Granting physicians working in nursing homes the status of medical specialists in their own right would help improve the quality of care for America's 1.6 million nursing home residents, according to an article published in the March 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Electrode Placement Affects Heart Failure Monitoring

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Monitoring of heart failure patients is more effective if electrodes are placed on the left side rather than the more commonly used right side, according to a study published in the March 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Protein Excess Implicated in Ovarian Cystic Disorder

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Ovaries from women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) produce high levels of nerve growth factor, and mice overproducing nerve growth factor in the ovaries develop cystic ovarian morphology and similar reproductive abnormalities as PCOS patients, according to research published online March 5 in Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Borderline Arterial Pressure Linked to Mobility Loss

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with peripheral arterial disease and even a borderline or low normal ankle-brachial index (ABI), a measure of relative arterial pressures in the lower and upper extremities, are at higher risk of later mobility loss, according to a study published in the March 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Drug Reduces Bleeding in Elderly After Heart Ischemia

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- The anti-thrombotic bivalirudin (Angiomax) is effective in improving ischemic outcomes and lowering bleeding complications in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS), particularly in elderly patients aged 75 years and older who are at higher risk of bleeding, according to a study published in the March 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text

Low-Dose Acitretin Shown Effective in Nail Psoriasis

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Acitretin, a medication historically prescribed for skin psoriasis, is comparable to the biologic drugs adalimumab and infliximab in clearing up nail psoriasis, according to the results of a clinical trial reported in the March issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text

Hospitalization Decreases Mobility in Elderly

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Using a life-space measure, which combines a person's destination, frequency of going there and degree of dependency in reaching it, shows that hospitalization restricts elders' subsequent mobility, according to an article published in the March 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Survival in Transplant Patients Hinges on Key Risk Factors

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- Low-risk combined heart and kidney transplantation recipients with a low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) have improved survival after the transplantation when compared with isolated heart transplant recipients, according to research published in the March issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text

Aspirin Dose Over 100 mg May Do Heart More Harm Than Good

TUESDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- The optimum daily dose of aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular events is probably between 75 and 81 mg, as a 100-mg dose or more has no obvious benefit and may cause harm in patients who are also taking clopidogrel, according to a report published in the March 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

No Role for Androgen Receptor in Regulating Muscle Strength

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- The androgen receptor is important in maintaining muscle mass and fiber type but has no role in regulating muscle strength or fatigue, according to a study published online March 5 in Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Information Could Help Ease Distress in Cancer Patients

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- A structured system of providing information to cancer patients showed some signs of reducing their psychological distress, according to research published online March 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Quinacrine Does Not Delay Course of Prion Disease

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Treating human prion disease with quinacrine does not reduce the mortality rate associated with the disease, according to a study published online March 10 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Studies Support Menopausal Breast Cancer Risk Screening

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence supports screening postmenopausal women for risk of breast cancer and the consideration of chemoprevention for women at high risk, as well as the use of lifestyle changes for cancer prevention, according to research published in the March 18 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Periodontal Disease Treatments Lower Birth Risks

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Treating pregnant women for periodontal disease lowers their risk for a preterm birth or a low birth weight infant, according to a meta-analysis of previous studies published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text

New Medication Relieves Hot Flushes in Menopause

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Menopausal women who experience daily moderate to severe hot flushes can reduce the symptom by daily doses of the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) desvenlafaxine (desvenlafaxine succinate), according to research published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Explains How Exercise Improves Insulin Sensitivity

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Mice that overexpress a protein that normally increases in muscle after exercise have improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity and do not become obese even after eating a high-fat diet, according to a study published online March 5 in Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Receptor Contributes to Control of Food Intake

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Endogenous hindbrain glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation contributes to the control of food intake by mediating gastric satiation signaling, according to the results of an animal study published online ahead of print March 5 in Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Preterm Babies at High Risk for Learning Problems

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Babies born at 25 weeks' gestation or less are at high risk for learning difficulties in childhood, and the majority require some form of special educational support, according to a study published online March 12 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Simplified Method Has Value for Prognosis in Thyroid Cancer

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- A quantified alternative to the TNM system -- a cancer-staging system using tumor size, node involvement and presence of metastases -- provides a simple method of predicting recurrence and cancer-specific mortality, with no loss of discrimination compared to other systems, for differentiated thyroid carcinoma, according to research published online March 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

One in Five U.S. Adults Continues to Smoke

MONDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Although smoking prevalence is declining nationwide, about one in five U.S. adults still smokes, and only one state has reduced smoking prevalence to the 12 percent or less goal established by Healthy People 2010, according to a report published in the March 13 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More Information

Absorbable Everolimus-Eluting Stent Safe and Effective

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A trial of a bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting coronary stent system shows that it is clinically safe, restores vasomotion and prevents restenosis, researchers report in the Mar. 14 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

BRCA+ Women Receptive to Prophylactic Mastectomy

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Women who test positive for the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation and are at high risk for breast cancer are more receptive to prophylactic mastectomy to reduce risk than women who test negative, according to research published in the Apr. 15 issue of Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

DCMR Stress Testing Predicts Cardiac Events in Women

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Similar to results in men, cardiac abnormalities induced in women after dobutamine cardiac magnetic resonance (DCMR) stress testing are associated with a higher risk of heart attack and cardiac death, according to a study in the March issue of Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Drugs Still Best First Step for Non-Acute Heart Disease

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Medical therapy is still the best initial management strategy for non-acute coronary artery disease despite innovations in catheter-based treatment, according to a study published in the Mar. 14 issue of The Lancet, while a second study describes the positive initial findings of a phase II trial of SCH 530348, an oral platelet protease-activated receptor-1 antagonist used in percutaneous coronary intervention.

Abstract - Trikalinos
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Becker
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Europe Missing Out on Heart Disease Prevention

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patient surveys conducted in three time periods between 1995 and 2007 show that European countries are missing the opportunity to reduce cardiovascular disease through preventive efforts, according to an article published in the Mar. 14 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Little Counseling for Males Carrying Cancer Mutation

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Many male carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations do not seek genetic counseling, even though the mutations predispose them to breast and other cancers, according to a review in the February issue of the Journal of Genetic Counseling.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Damaged Repair Genes Increase Hodgkin's Disease Risk

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in DNA repair genes appear to increase the risk of developing Hodgkin's disease, especially when the SNPs occur in more than one of the repair gene types, according to research published in the Apr. 15 issue of Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Steroid Abuse Tests Ignore Athletes' Ethnicity

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Urinary steroid profiles used to look for evidence of testosterone abuse among athletes fail to take into account individual variations in hormone activity, which differ across various ethnic groups, according to a report published online Mar. 12 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Specialist Nurses Help Grieving Parents Agree to Autopsy

FRIDAY, Mar. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Bereaved parents are more likely to consent to a request for post-mortem imaging for research purposes if they are approached by a specially trained nurse with experience in family and bereavement counseling, according to a study published online Mar. 12 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Injection for Hip Osteoarthritis Pain Found Ineffective

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A single intraarticular injection of hyaluronic acid for the treatment of hip osteoarthritis was ineffective in achieving significant pain relief in comparison to placebo, according to research published in the March issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Biomarkers Signal Women's Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated biomarkers of inflammation in the blood may help identify women with a higher risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis years before symptoms appear, according to study findings published in the March issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bariatric Surgery Has Double Benefits for Diabetic Patients

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Most type 2 diabetes patients who undergo bariatric surgery see improvements, not just in weight loss but also in diabetes control, according to a study published in the March issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Drugs Don't Boost Survival in Older Heart Failure Patients

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- People over 80 years of age who have heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, a prevalent condition in the elderly, do not benefit significantly from commonly prescribed cardiac medications, according to research published in the Mar. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Testing Predicts Outcomes in Left Bundle Branch Block

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) are at higher risk of death and major cardiac events if they have abnormal results during exercise echocardiography, researchers report in the March issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Too Much Sleep for Older Women Raises Mortality Risk

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Older women who report napping daily or sleeping nine or more hours in a 24-hour period are at increased risk of mortality from all causes, with the exception of cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Blood Glucose Affects Survival in Non-Diabetic STEMI Cases

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- In non-diabetic patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), high blood glucose at hospital admission is independently associated with an increased risk of short- and mid-term death, according to a report published in the Mar. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Treatment May Reduce Inflammation in Diabetics

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Treating diabetic patients with reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) reduces inflammation, increases cholesterol efflux from macrophages and may be atheroprotective, according to study findings published in the Mar. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Ovarian Screening Tests Can Be Sensitive and Accurate

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Ovarian screening tests comprising transvaginal ultrasound and a CA125 blood test have a high degree of sensitivity and specificity, while transvaginal ultrasound alone is also highly sensitive but lacks the specificity of the combined screening test, according to an article published online Mar. 11 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gluten-Free Diet May Be Useful in Wider Population

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A gluten-free diet may be beneficial for individuals with mild enteropathy and endomysial antibodies, according to research published in the March issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Factors Affect Lymph Node Biopsy in Melanoma

THURSDAY, Mar. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for clinical stage I and II melanoma is associated with socioeconomic factors, according to research published online Mar. 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Non-Simultaneous Transplants Can Increase Kidney Donation

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A series of 10 kidney transplantations initiated by a single altruistic donor demonstrates the potential of such chains to increase the number of transplantations and improve donor-recipient matches, according to a report published in the Mar. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Ozone Hikes Risk of Death from Respiratory Causes

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Increased concentration of environmental ozone exposure significantly increases the risk of death from respiratory causes, but does not significantly increase the risk of cardiovascular death when particulate matter (PM) concentration is also taken into account, according to research published in the Mar. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

New Diagnostic Test Developed for Cardiomyopathy

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Testing myocardial samples for a reduced level of the desmosomal protein plakoglobin can be an effective diagnostic tool for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), according to research published in the Mar. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hospitalists Providing Care for More Older Patients

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalists provided a rapidly increasing amount of care for hospitalized Medicare patients during a recent decade, according to research published in the Mar. 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Tube Feeding Shows Benefits in Short Bowel Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Following the postoperative period, patients with short bowel syndrome may have greater nutrient absorption with tube feeding than oral feeding, according to research published in the March issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

US Diabetic Retinopathy Cases Set to Triple by 2050

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- As the number of Americans with diabetes continues to rise, so will the incidence of diabetes-related eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, cataracts and glaucoma, according to an editorial published in the March issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Editorial

Migraines in Pregnancy Linked to Vascular Disease

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who experience migraine headaches are at increased risk of stroke and vascular disease, according to research published online Mar. 10 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

Age Affects Optimal Treatment for Spinal Metastases

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Although surgery for spinal metastases is generally superior to radiation, the treatment giving the best outcome is strongly affected by age, researchers report in the Mar. 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

UK Hospitals Can Do More to Answer Recycling Call

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Social attitudes, legal barriers and logistical and institutional restrictions all undermine efforts to reduce, reuse and recycle waste in the hospital setting in the United Kingdom, according to an article published online Mar. 10 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Folic Acid Supplements Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Folic acid supplementation may be associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer, and different definitions of "lead time" in studies on screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) can affect their outcome, according to two reports published online Mar. 10 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract - Figueiredo
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial
Abstract- Draisma
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Anger, Hostility Linked to Coronary Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Anger, hostility and depression are associated with a higher risk of coronary heart disease in healthy individuals, according to two studies published in the Mar. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract - Chida
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Whang
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial
Editorial

Routine Screening of Excised Breast Tissue Can Backfire

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Most plastic surgeons routinely send breast reduction tissue for routine histological testing, effectively screening women under the age of 50 for breast cancer without their consent, according to an article published online Mar. 10 in BMJ. Three related editorials discuss the surgical management problems, ethical dilemmas and implications for patients of such a practice.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial - Treasure
Editorial - Sugarman
Editorial - Boase

Vitamin C May Help Prevent Gout in Men

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- High vitamin C intake in men is independently associated with a significantly lower risk of gout, according to a report published in the Mar. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Diabetics Have Different Plaque Qualities

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acute coronary syndrome, those with diabetes have greater inflammatory status and more plaques with signs of vulnerability, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Third-Generation Smallpox Vaccine LC16m8 Deemed Effective

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In unvaccinated or previously vaccinated adults, the use of the third-generation smallpox vaccine LC16m8 is associated with a high rate of seroconversion or booster response, and a low rate of adverse reactions, according to research published in the Mar. 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Family Docs Provide Other Diagnoses at Prenatal Visits

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Family physicians were more likely to diagnose non-obstetric problems in female patients during prenatal visits than obstetricians, according to research published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Warmer Weather Linked to Increased Headache Risk

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Higher outdoor temperatures were associated with a short-term increase in headache risk, according to the results of a study published in the Mar. 10 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Faster Diagnosis Benefits Acute Chest Pain Patients

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In low-risk patients who present to hospitals with acute chest pain, an accelerated diagnostic protocol may be associated with less impairment of quality of life than usual care, according to a report published in the Mar. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Specialists Spend Much Time on Routine Care

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial portion of medical specialists' office-based activity is devoted to routine and preventive care for known patients, for services that might often be handled by primary care physicians, according to research published in the March/April issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Over 6 Million Older Americans May Benefit from Statins

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 6.5 million older American adults have levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) that suggest that they may benefit from statin treatment, according to a report in the Mar. 17 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Insurance Status Affects Access to Eye Care

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Uninsured Americans are far less likely than their insured counterparts to seek the services of an eye care professional, researchers report in the March issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Macular Degeneration Linked with Range of Illnesses

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients with age-related macular degeneration are more likely than their counterparts without the eye disease to experience a wide range of illnesses, including depression, hip fracture and blindness, according to a report published in the March issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Metabolic Disorder, Obesity Associated with Dementia

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obesity, and its associated metabolic disorders including diabetes, are linked with dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in a series of articles in the March issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract - Fitzpatrick
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Yaffe
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Helzner
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Kanaya
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Studies Investigate Health Care at End of Life

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- End-of-life health care may be associated with feelings of abandonment, and its associated costs are lower after physician-patient communication but higher among minorities, according to a series of studies published in the Mar. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Back
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Ganzini
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Zhang
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Hanchate
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Infective Endocarditis Remains a Lethal Threat

TUESDAY, Mar. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Despite recent advances in diagnosis and treatment, infective endocarditis continues to be frequently fatal, with acute presentations more common than previously thought and a high rate of Staphylococcus aureus infection, according to study findings published in the Mar. 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Vascular Risks May Speed Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Pre-existing vascular risk factors such as abnormal cholesterol levels and diabetes may be associated with an accelerated cognitive decline in patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, according to the results of a study published in the March issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Reduced Lung Function

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Metabolic syndrome is associated with a higher risk of lung function impairment, primarily due to abdominal obesity, according to research published in the Mar. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

No Link Between Wine and Breast Cancer Risk

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Higher alcohol consumption, with the exception of red and white wine, is associated with a greater risk of breast cancer, researchers report in the March issue of Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Simpler Apnea Treatment Model Deemed Effective

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A simplified model of diagnosing and treating obstructive sleep apnea can lead to outcomes that aren't inferior to those from in-hospital polysomnograms involving physicians, according to research published in the Mar. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

High-Dose Atorvastatin Reduces Cardiovascular Risks

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In heart attack patients with stable coronary disease, treatment with high-dose atorvastatin may be associated with greater benefits than treatment with standard-dose simvastatin, especially among younger patients, according to the results of a study published in the Mar. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text

Some Dietician Students Biased Against Obese Patients

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Undergraduate dietetics students have a moderate degree of fat phobia and display bias in their approach to treating obese patients, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Patient Confidentiality Versus Disease Prevention Reviewed

MONDAY, Mar. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The morality of patient confidentiality laws are questioned in recent research presented in a special report in the March issue of The Lancet Oncology.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Comprehensive Screenings in Healthy Can Find Cancers

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Whole-body cancer screenings using a battery of modalities, including positron emission tomography (PET), have the ability to detect a range of early-stage cancers, according to research published online Mar. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pulmonary Embolism Common in Acute COPD Patients

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Pulmonary embolism may occur in one-quarter of patients hospitalized with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to research published in the March issue of Chest.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Obesity Linked to Altered Ovarian Follicular Environment

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- An altered ovarian follicular environment may help explain why overweight and obese women have more difficulty achieving pregnancy than normal-weight women, according to research published online Feb. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Compound Could Be Useful As an HIV Microbicide

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The use of glycerol monolaurate to protect monkeys from infection following intravaginal exposure to simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) points to the potential efficacy of this product against HIV in humans, according to research published online Mar. 4 in the journal Nature.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Receptor in Osteosarcoma May Provide Treatment Approach

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Interleukin-11 receptor alpha (IL-11Rα) appears to present a target for therapy of osteosarcoma, according to research published online Feb. 24 in Cancer Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Depression Symptoms in Stable COPD Linked to Mortality

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Depression symptoms occurring in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are associated with all-cause mortality, according to a report published in the March issue of Chest.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Distress Linked to Lower Activity in Cancer Survivors

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Colorectal cancer survivors who show high levels of somatization, or physical symptoms of psychological distress, are less likely to be physically active, while patients who have a more positive view of their cancer are more likely to be physically active, according to the results of a study published online Mar. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Young Males Drink More When Alcohol Portrayed in Media

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Watching a movie or commercials portraying alcohol use leads to higher total alcohol consumption among young men, according to research published online Mar. 4 in Alcohol and Alcoholism.

Abstract
Full Text

Measures Assess Cancer Care Based on Patient Concerns

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Three measures used to assess the quality of medical care at the time of cancer diagnosis and treatment are reliable and valid, and reflect the concerns of patients about a lack of communication about their diagnosis and treatment as well as their treatment experience, according to a report published online Mar. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Use of Stroke Prevention Services Can Be Improved

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- There is widespread underutilization of stroke secondary prevention services, according to a report published online Mar. 5 in Stroke.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Exercise in Later Life Reduces Mortality Risk

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Men who increase their level of exercise later in life can bring their mortality risk into line with their counterparts who have constantly exercised, according to a report published online Mar. 5 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

Transdermal Patches Pose Burn Risk During Scans

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning about the risk of burns as a result of wearing medicated patches, such as those used for smoking cessation or pain relief, during MRI scans.

More Information

Some Tocolytics Carry High Risk of Adverse Reactions

FRIDAY, Mar. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who are treated with tocolytics to postpone preterm labor may be at high risk of a serious adverse reaction to the drugs, according to research published online Mar. 5 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

Less Intraperitoneal, Liver Fat Seen in Black Patients

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- In a study including black, white and Hispanic patients, black patients appeared to be particularly resistant to the accumulation of triglycerides in the liver associated with insulin resistance, according to research published in the March issue of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text

Black Neighborhoods Have Fewer Healthy Food Options

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Areas of Baltimore with a predominantly black or lower-income population have fewer healthy foods available than white and higher-income areas, according to two studies, one published in the December 2008 issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine and the other in the March issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Abstract - American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Racial Disparities in Heart Failure Treatment Found

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Black and Hispanic patients eligible to receive cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) are less likely to receive therapy than white patients, and white patients are more likely to receive CRT-D outside of published guidelines, according to a report in the March issue of Heart Rhythm.

Abstract
Full Text

Patient Anxiety Linked to Timing of Prostate Treatment

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Anxiety over the disease is a major predictor in older men's decision to begin androgen deprivation therapy early after biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer, according to research published online Mar. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rituximab May Be Effective for Severe Lupus Nephritis

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with relapsing or refractory lupus nephritis, rituximab may be an effective treatment if early B-cell depletion is achieved, according to research published online Mar. 4 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Breathing Helium Improves Exercise in Pulmonary Disease

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients who breathe helium during pulmonary rehabilitation increase their exercise intensity and duration and improve their quality of life more than patients who breathe air, according to research published in the March issue of Chest.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Positive Outcomes for Cancer Patients in Poor Condition

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Advanced colorectal cancer patients with poor performance status still derive benefit from chemotherapy, although with a higher risk of toxicity and death, according to study findings published online Mar. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Arm Fracture Raises Risk of Hip Fracture in Elderly Women

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly women who fracture their arm are at greater risk of fracturing their hip within a year, researchers report in the Mar. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gastric Bypass Surgery May Improve Sex Life in Obese Men

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- In obese men, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery may be associated with increased production of reproductive hormones and improved sexual function, according to study findings released online Jan. 27 in advance of publication in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Mental, Drug Disorders High in Women Ending Welfare

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of mental health and substance abuse disorders is markedly higher among single mothers nearing the end of welfare eligibility compared with the general U.S. female population, according to the results of a study published in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Unnecessary Laparotomies Prevented in Pregnant Women

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- MRI can help to prevent unnecessary laparotomies in pregnant patients with suspected acute appendicitis, according to research published in the March issue of Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Obama Wants to Spend $630 Billion on Health Care Reform

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Achieving health care reform is one of President Barack Obama's major challenges, and his newly released spending plan calls on Congress to commit $630 billion over the next decade to finance that reform, according to an article published online Mar. 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text

Defects in Hormone Cycling After Prenatal Testosterone

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Female sheep that were exposed to excess testosterone in utero have defects in reproductive hormone cycling, particularly if they become obese, researchers report in the March issue of Endocrinology. The observations may explain the anovulation observed in obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome, where excess prenatal steroid exposure may play a role in the disease.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Vitamin Pills May Not Help Reach Intake Guidelines

THURSDAY, Mar. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Taking dietary supplements can help patients reach recommended intake levels for calcium, vitamin C and magnesium, but this is not always the case and many adults are still falling short of the recommended intake, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Mepolizumab Beneficial in Eosinophilic Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Mepolizumab therapy reduces exacerbations and has other benefits in asthma patients with eosinophilia, according to two studies published in the Mar. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Haldar
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Nair
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Testosterone Not Beneficial for Female Sexual Dysfunction

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Hypoactive sexual desire disorder is a common condition in Western women, but evidence suggests that treatment with transdermal testosterone patches is ineffective and potentially risky, according to an article published in the March issue of the Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Distinct Liver Cancers

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with hepatocellular carcinoma whose only risk factor for liver disease is evidence of metabolic syndrome, the cancer typically occurs without significant fibrosis in the surrounding liver, according to research published in the March issue of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Marked Disparity in Incidence of Severe Maternal Morbidity

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Significant disparity exists in the incidence of maternal morbidity among women in the United Kingdom, particularly affecting black African and Caribbean ethnic groups, according to research published Mar. 3 in BMJ Online First.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Parent's Bipolar Disorder, Offspring's Mental Illness Linked

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Children of patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder are at greater risk of developing psychiatric disorders, especially early-onset bipolar disorder, according to research published in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Alcohol Linked to Modest Pancreatic Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol consumption is associated with a small increase in risk of pancreatic cancer, according to research published online Mar. 3 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Teens' Lipid Levels Predict Atherosclerosis in Adulthood

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who have abnormal lipid levels are at higher risk of developing preclinical atherosclerosis as adults, regardless of the lipid cutoffs used by two classification systems, researchers report in the Mar. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Arthritis Restricts Exercise in Heart Disease Patients

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease patients who also have arthritis are significantly less likely to engage in physical activity than those without arthritis, according to a report published in the Feb. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More Information

Abnormal Sleep Schedule Linked to Adverse Effects

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- An altered sleep-wake cycle such as that seen during jet lag and shift work can have wide-ranging metabolic and cardiovascular implications, according to research published online Mar. 2 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Alcohol Abuse Raises Risk for Depression, Not Vice Versa

WEDNESDAY, Mar. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol abuse/dependence leads to increased risk of major depression instead of vice versa, answering a much debated question regarding the link between these two events, according to research published in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Proton Pump Inhibitors May Reduce Benefits of Clopidogrel

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Acute coronary syndrome patients who are prescribed clopidogrel in combination with a proton pump inhibitor are at increased risk of adverse outcomes compared with patients prescribed clopidogrel alone, according to a report published in the Mar. 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Oseltamivir-Resistant Flu Viruses Increasing

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The 2008 to 2009 influenza season will see a higher prevalence of oseltamivir-resistant viruses, and certain strains of the virus are highly pathogenic to high-risk patients, according to two studies published online Mar. 2 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Another study reports that intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccine is associated with more medical encounters than trivalent inactivated vaccine.

Abstract - Wang et al
Full Text
Abstract - Dharan et al
Full Text
Abstract - Gooskens et al
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Vitamin K Doesn't Reduce Bleeding in Warfarin Patients

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In patients receiving warfarin, vitamin K does not reduce bleeding, according to study findings published in the Mar. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Outcomes Reporting May Make Physicians Risk-Averse

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Although clinical outcomes report cards perform a valuable public health purpose, the experience of publicly reporting death rates after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in two states suggests that doctors may become risk-averse and avoid high-risk patients, according to a review in the Mar. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Cardiovascular Risk Biomarkers Cleared By Kidneys

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Two biomarkers that reflect myocardial wall tension and are used to assess the risk of cardiovascular disease are cleared by the kidney, and therefore correct concentrations rely on proper renal function, researchers report in the Mar. 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Patient Connectedness Predicts Level of Primary Care

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Patient-physician connectedness is associated with a greater likelihood of receiving guideline-consistent care, according to a report published in the Mar. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Physicians Urged to Implement Nutritional Guidelines

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- To reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke, physicians should learn behavior change and motivational interviewing strategies aimed at changing eating habits in children and adults, according to a Scientific Statement published in the Mar. 3 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Meningococcal Disease in Maine Well-Reported

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The reporting of meningococcal disease cases in the state of Maine reached the 98 percent level between 2001 and 2006, but only 56 percent of cases were reported within a day of admission to hospital, according to a report published in the Feb. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More Information

Racial Disparities Seen in Post-Heart Attack Outcomes

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with myocardial infarction, overall outcomes are significantly worse in blacks than in whites. But the differences are attenuated after adjustment for patient characteristics that differ by race such as socioeconomic status and co-morbid conditions, researchers report in the Mar. 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Marathon Runners Have Less Hypertension, Diabetes

TUESDAY, Mar. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Marathon runners have lower prevalence of hypercholesterolemia, diabetes and hypertension compared to non-marathon runners, according to a report published in the March issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Carbon Dioxide Anesthesia Raises Stress Hormones in Rats

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Euthanizing laboratory rats by carbon dioxide anesthesia before decapitation, which is considered more humane than direct decapitation, raises the levels of some stress hormones, according to a report published online Feb. 12 in Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

US Motor Vehicle-Related Death Rates Vary Geographically

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Although the mortality rate related to motor vehicles remained almost unchanged from 1999 to 2005 in the United States, on closer inspection the data reveals wide variations from state to state, as well as by gender and ethnicity, according to a report published in the Feb. 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More Information

IFRD1 Gene Linked to Severity of Cystic Fibrosis

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The IFRD1 gene appears to play a role in the severity of cystic fibrosis lung disease through its influence on neutrophil effector function, according to research published online Feb. 25 in the journal Nature.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Glycemic Control Approaches Lead to Similar Outcomes

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Different approaches to glycemic control in type 2 diabetics following myocardial infarction were associated with similar risk of later cardiovascular events, according to research published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text

Incidence of Sick Leave at Iranian Car Company Examined

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Workers in Iran, a middle-income country, take little sick leave for neck and shoulder pain compared with workers in high-income countries, researchers report in the Feb. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Much Lung Cancer Disparity Appears to Be Due to Smoking

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking appeared to explain much -- but not all -- of the inequality in lung cancer risk attributable to differences in education in a large sample of Europeans, according to research published in the Mar. 4 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

CT Perfusion May Predict Hemorrhagic Transformation

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acute ischemic stroke, admission perfusion-derived permeability-surface area product (PS) measurement may differentiate those who are and are not likely to develop hemorrhagic transformation, according to the results of a pilot study published in the March issue of Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Examines Caffeine's Link to Less Skin Cancer

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Caffeine causes skin cells damaged by ultraviolet light to self-destruct by blocking a cellular pathway involved in regulating the cell cycle, which may explain why tea and coffee consumption is associated with lower rates of non-melanoma skin cancer, according to the results of a study published online Feb. 26 in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text

Age Stereotypes Affect Disease Risk Later in Life

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- People who have negative views about aging are more likely to have a cardiovascular event later in life, according to research published online Feb. 13 in Psychological Science.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Americans Losing Sleep Over Financial Woes

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Concerns over the state of the economy and personal finances are keeping one-third of Americans from having a good night's sleep, according to a report published by the National Sleep Foundation.

More Information
Full Text

Patients' Rights Documents Usually Difficult to Understand

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Patients' bill of rights documents in U.S. hospitals are generally written at a complexity level that far exceeds the average adult's reading ability, according to a report published online Feb. 3 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Nonionic IV Contrast Material Safe for Children

MONDAY, Mar. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In the pediatric population, the administration of nonionic intravenous contrast material (ioversol) is safe and only rarely is associated with adverse reactions, according to research published in the March issue of Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician's Briefing

HealthDay

HealthDay is the world’s largest syndicator of health news and content, and providers of custom health/medical content.

Consumer Health News

A health news feed, reviewing the latest and most topical health stories.

Professional News

A news feed for Health Care Professionals (HCPs), reviewing latest medical research and approvals.