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May 2009 Briefing - Internal Medicine

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Internal Medicine for May 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Links Between Bleeding, PCI, Mortality Explored

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Major bleeding may play a causal role in mortality in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to a paper published in the June 2 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Window for Stroke Treatment Opened to 4.5 Hours

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- The clot-busting drug recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) can be given to eligible stroke victims as long as 4.5 hours after onset of symptoms, according to a new scientific advisory published online May 28 in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association, but the American Heart Association (AHA)/American Stroke Association (ASA) still urge further analyses.

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Watching Advanced Dementia Video Affects Care Decisions

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Showing elderly people a video depicting advanced dementia after they hear a verbal description, affects the choices they make about end-of-life care, according to a study published online May 28 in BMJ.

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Stimulant Gum Can Cause Caffeine Overdose

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Excessive consumption of stimulant chewing gum resulted in the hospitalization of a 13-year-old boy due to caffeine overdose, highlighting the hidden risk to children of such easily available products, according to a case report published in the May 30 issue of The Lancet.

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Vascular Disease Prevention Benefits of Aspirin Uncertain

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- The benefits of using aspirin in the primary prevention of vascular disease are uncertain because it reduces the risk of heart attack but increases the risk of internal bleeding, according to a study published in the May 30 issue of The Lancet.

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Cancer Physicians Often Do Not Take Part in Bereavement

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Many cancer physicians do not routinely participate in the bereavement process after patients die, and terminally ill lung cancer patients often have not discussed hospice with their health care providers, according to a pair of studies in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Beta Blocker Use Promotes Survival in Heart Disease

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term use of beta blockers in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction reduces the risk of death, according to a study in the June 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Music May Lessen Pain for Premature Babies

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Playing music in neonatal units may help premature babies to feed better and reduce their pain, according to a review published online on May 28 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal & Neonatal Edition.

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Childhood Exposure to Violent Parents Raises Depression Risk

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Adults who were exposed to parental violence during childhood are more likely to have mental health problems and become violent spouses and parents themselves, according to a study published online on May 28 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Physician, Patient Traits Affect Back Pain Imaging in Elderly

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Quality metrics that focus on overuse as well as underuse of services may be helpful in improving the quality of diagnostic services for elderly patients presenting with acute low back pain (LBP), according to a study in the May 25 Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Medical School Faculty, Students Conflict Over Priorities

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Medical school faculty and new physicians who have completed internship training hold differing views about the procedures that are essential to learn during internship, according to a study published in the April issue of Medical Teacher.

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Retail Clinics Not Accessible to Underserved Populations

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- So-called retail clinics tend to be located in economically advantaged areas and are not readily accessible to the populations that most need them, according to a study in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Cervical Testing Rates Too Low in Women With Bowel Disease

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) -- who may be at higher risk of cervical abnormalities due to immunosuppressant use -- may have suboptimal screening rates for cervical dysplasia and cancer, according to research published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Signaling Pathway Mediates Steroid-Induced Diabetes

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Steroid-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and diabetes mellitus are mediated through a cellular signaling pathway that, when blocked, can restore β-cell function, according to a study published online May 14 in Endocrinology.

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Electrophysiology Predicts Tachycardia After Heart Failure

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy who go on to develop ventricular tachycardia have differences in the electrophysiology and electroanatomy of the scarred areas, according to a study published online May 27 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Careful Processing Urged for Loaner Instruments

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- At hospitals and ambulatory surgery centers, instruments loaned from other institutions may arrive in poor or contaminated condition, creating problems for both the loaning and receiving facilities and compromising patient safety, according to a report published in the May issue of the AORN Journal.

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Stockings Do Not Appear to Cut Thrombosis Risk After Stroke

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Thigh-length graduated compression stockings do not reduce the risk of deep vein thrombosis in patients with acute stroke, according to a study published online on May 27 in The Lancet.

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Decision Makers Can't Delay Until H1N1's Scale Is Clear

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Officials must decide what actions to take before the severity and scale of the H1N1 virus are certain, and geography plays an important role in the incidence of the virus, according to perspectives published online May 27 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Perimenopause Temporarily Affects Cognitive Performance

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Perimenopause may be associated with some declines in cognitive performance which return to premenopausal levels after menopause, and hormone therapy has differential effects on cognitive performance depending on the time of initiation, according to a study in the May 26 issue of Neurology.

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Postoperative Voiding Rules May Need Review

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- The requirement of postoperative voiding before discharge may unnecessarily delay patients from leaving the hospital, particularly with the growing number of surgical procedures that are now performed on an outpatient basis, according to an article published in the May issue of the AORN Journal.

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Gastric Bypass Surgery Linked to Kidney Stones

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Obese patients who undergo gastric bypass surgery may have a significantly increased risk of kidney stone disease and the need to undergo kidney stone surgery, according to a study published in the June issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Computerized Prescription Order Errors a Risk for Patients

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Computerized provider order entry systems are prone to input errors that may put patients at risk, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Focus on Meaningful Work Protects Doctors From Burnout

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Academic faculty physicians who focus on what they find most meaningful are less likely to experience burnout, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Cancer Deaths Reported Down Between 1990 and 2005

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- A 19.2 percent drop in cancer deaths in men and an 11.4 percent drop in women avoided about 650,000 cancer deaths between 1990 and 2005, according to the American Cancer Society's annual report of cancer statistics in CA, A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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Age Affects Alzheimer's Pathology Link to Dementia

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Most neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease are strongly associated with dementia only in younger elderly persons, according to a study in the May 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Ablation Eradicates Disease in Barrett's Esophagus

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Radiofrequency ablation is effective in completely eradicating intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus, according to a study in the May 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Gene Mutation Identified in Various Myeloid Cancers

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- The TET2 gene is mutated in about 15 percent of patients with various myeloid cancers, and the mutations appear to precede mutations in a gene previously associated with these diseases, according to a study in the May 28 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Thermal Printer Chemical Can Provoke Asthma Symptoms

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- A job printing lottery tickets with a thermal printer in a tiny kiosk paid off in acute asthma symptoms for a 62-year-old woman, according to a case report in the May 28 New England Journal of Medicine.

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Better Rat Model of Epilepsy in Women Developed

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- A better animal model of epilepsy in women has been developed where the animals retain reproductive function, which may allow better study of epilepsy where seizures occur during specific stages of the menstrual cycle, according to a study published online May 14 in Endocrinology.

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Statins Improve Long-Term Outcomes After First Stroke

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- First-ever acute ischemic stroke patients who are prescribed statins after hospital discharge may have a significantly lower long-term risk of recurrent stroke or death, according to a study published in the May 26 issue of Neurology.

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Gene Finding May Influence Kidney Transplant Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney transplant recipients who have T allelic variants in exons 21 or 26 of the ABCB1 gene may have a greater likelihood of several adverse events related to cyclosporine A, according to research published online May 21 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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U.K. Initiative Has Unclear Effects on Diabetes Care

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Since the late 1990s, the management of diabetes has improved in the United Kingdom, but it may not be a direct result of the quality and outcomes framework introduced in 2004, according to a study published online May 27 in BMJ.

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Tamoxifen Recommended to Reduce Breast Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Tamoxifen and raloxifene can reduce the risk of breast cancer in high-risk women, according to updated guidelines published online May 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. In a related study in the same issue, weekly treatment of metastatic breast cancer with an albumin-bound form of paclitaxel improves survival compared with docetaxel.

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Colorectal Cancer Outcomes Improve at Two Cancer Centers

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Outcomes for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer have markedly improved at two leading cancer centers since 1997 because of increased use of liver resection and the introduction of new cancer drugs, according to a study published online May 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Lower-Insurance Mortality Unaffected by Comorbidities

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Comorbidity levels do not explain why patients with colorectal cancer who have private insurance have lower death rates than patients who are uninsured or have government insurance, according to a study published online May 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. In a related study in the same issue, hospital factors such as quality can help explain some of the higher mortality in black patients with breast or colon cancer.

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Repeat Caesareans Linked to Neonatal Respiratory Problems

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Infants born via elective repeat Caesarean delivery may face a higher risk of certain adverse outcomes, and the rate of delivery hospitalizations involving hypertensive disorders has risen significantly in recent years, according to two studies published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Obese and Diabetic Youth Have Carotid Abnormalities

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Young people who are obese or who have type 2 diabetes mellitus have abnormalities in the carotid artery that should serve as an alert to increased risk of stroke and myocardial infarction in adulthood, according to a study published online on May 26 in Circulation.

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Web and Computer Programs Effective in Smoking Cessation

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Web-based and computer-based smoking cessation programs can be effective in getting people to quit smoking, according to a meta-analysis of clinical trials of those interventions reported in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Three-Step Program Helps Manage Depression and Pain

TUESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with depression and chronic pain, an optimized three-step intervention may lead to significant improvements in both conditions, according to a study published in the May 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Acid Suppressors Linked to Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Among inpatients, treatment with acid-suppressive medication -- particularly proton-pump inhibitors -- may significantly increase the risk of hospital-acquired pneumonia, according to a study published in the May 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Hypertension Observed in Professional Football Players

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to other healthy, young adult men, professional football players are less likely to have impaired fasting glucose but more likely to have hypertension, according to a study published in the May 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Balance Dysfunction Common in American Adults

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Disrupted balance as a result of vestibular dysfunction is common among American adults and is a significant contributor to the incidence of falls, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer Low in Poor Women

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Only 64 percent of poor insured women with breast cancer fill prescriptions for adjuvant hormonal treatment, even though this is known to reduce cancer mortality, according to a study published online May 18 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Morphine Metabolite May Increase Pain Sensitivity

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Injections of the morphine metabolite morphine-6β-glucuronide (M6G) -- a potent analgesic in humans -- may also cause hyperalgesia, according to research published in the June issue of Anesthesiology.

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Triglyceride Level Associated with Diabetic Neuropathy

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- The progression of diabetic neuropathy is associated with elevated triglycerides in the blood and with decreased conduction of the peroneal motor nerve, according to a study published online May 1 in Diabetes.

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Bevacizumab May Increase Risk of Gastrointestinal Perforation

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- The use of bevacizumab in cancer treatment increases the risk of gastrointestinal perforation in comparison with other medications, according to a medical literature review published online May 25 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Patients Have Strong Ideas About Electronic Records

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients expect increased use of electronic personal health records to transform the way they interact with the health care system, and their opinions could help strengthen the design of new patient record technologies, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Age at Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer Decreased Since 1980s

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- The age at which prostate cancer is diagnosed has declined in recent decades, according to research published online May 22 in Cancer.

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Gestational Diabetes Provides a Chance to Educate Patients

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Because women with gestational diabetes are at increased risk of subsequently developing type 2 diabetes, increasing awareness among both physicians and patients about the risk can be used as an opportunity to promote behavior that may delay or prevent the disease, according to a study published in the May 23 issue of The Lancet.

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Multivitamins Linked to Longer Telomere Length

MONDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Women who take multivitamins may have longer leukocyte telomere length, suggesting that multivitamin usage may help slow the aging process, according to a study first published in the June 1 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Vitamin D Linked to Cognitive Function in Men

MONDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- The level of vitamin D in the blood is associated with cognitive function in middle-aged and older men, according to a study published online May 21 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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Many Black Women Forgo Late Stage Breast Cancer Treatment

MONDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- There are distinct clinical characteristics associated with black women who have stage III breast cancer, and understanding the reasons why many of them refuse treatment is key to improving compliance rates, according to a study published online on May 22 in Cancer.

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Music Reduces Confusion After Hip or Knee Surgery

MONDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults who undergo hip or knee surgery, postoperative music therapy may reduce acute confusion, according to a study published in the May issue of Applied Nursing Research.

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Daily Glucose Self-Monitoring May Reduce Macrosomia Risk

MONDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Daily glucose self-monitoring in women with diet-treated gestational diabetes may be associated with a lower risk of delivering an oversized infant than routine weekly monitoring, according to research published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Study May Explain Fewer Cancers in Down Syndrome

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Increased expression of at least one gene on the extra copy of chromosome 21 in patients with Down syndrome reduces angiogenesis and may explain why these patients have a lower incidence of cancer and other diseases, according to a study published online May 20 in Nature.

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Mad Cow Disease May Be Minimal Threat in Britain

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- In the United Kingdom, the prevalence of the prion protein that causes variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (PrPCJD) may be lower than previously estimated, according to a study published online May 21 in BMJ.

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Meth Use May Be Growing More Common in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- In recent years, methamphetamine use has become much more common in pregnant women admitted into substance abuse treatment facilities, according to research published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Telemedicine Benefits Children With Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- In children with type 1 diabetes, a school-based telemedicine program may lead to better outcomes, according to a study published online May 22 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

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Age Linked to Positive Lymph Nodes in Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Women with early breast cancer are less likely to have positive lymph nodes with increasing age up to the age of 70 years, but are more likely to have positive lymph nodes with increasing age above 70, according to a study published online May 18 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Intensive Glucose Lowering Reduces Diabetics' Heart Risks

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 2 diabetes, an intensive glucose-lowering regimen significantly reduces coronary events without increasing the risk of death, according to a study published in the May 23 issue of The Lancet.

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Drug-Resistant Pneumonia Emerging in Healthy People

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an emerging cause of pneumonia in otherwise healthy individuals, according to a case report and review in the June issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Fenofibrate May Help Prevent Amputations in Diabetics

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 2 diabetes, fenofibrate may lower the risk of minor amputation, according to a study published in the May 23 issue of The Lancet.

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Vitamin D Linked to Outcomes in Early Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Women with early breast cancer who are deficient in vitamin D have a higher risk of distant recurrences and death, according to a study published online May 18 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Turmeric Component Reduces Weight Gain in Obesity Model

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- A component of the spice turmeric blocks the growth and development of fat cells and reduces weight gain in a mouse model of obesity, according to a study in the May issue of the Journal of Nutrition.

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Cellular Pathway Mediates Longevity Due to Diet

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- A component of a nutrient-sensing cellular signaling pathway plays an important role in the increased lifespan resulting from dietary restriction, according to a study published online May 22 in PLoS Genetics.

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Special Interest in Back Pain May Cause Treatment to Suffer

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Australian physicians with an interest in low back pain (LBP) or related fields harbor beliefs that are at odds with current evidence-based practice, according to a study in the May 15 issue of Spine.

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Comfrey Root Ointment Found to Reduce Lower Back Pain

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- An ointment made from comfrey root extract dramatically reduced lower back pain compared to placebo, according to a study published in the May 21 issue of the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Echocardiography in CRT Patient Selection Controversial

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Research should continue into the use of echocardiography as a means to select candidates for implant of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices, but QRS prolongation remains the recommended criterion in making that decision. That was the apparent consensus of a trio of papers arguing the question in the May 26 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Overnight Hemodialysis Improves Urea Reduction

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to conventional four- to five-hour hemodialysis, long overnight dialysis lasting six to seven hours results in a better urea reduction ratio and less anemia, according to a study published online on May 21 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Exercise Echocardiography Can Predict Cardiac Events, Death

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise echocardiography (EE) can help predict major cardiac events and mortality in patients who appear normal on electrocardiogram (ECG) tests, according to a study in the May 26 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Breast Tumors Linked to Depression and Anxiety

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- The mere presence of breast tumors in rats is associated with depression and anxiety, according to a study published online May 18 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Democrats Set Ambitious Goal for Health Care Reform

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Congressional Democrats face formidable challenges in their efforts to pass health care reform legislation by July 31, but physicians can take the lead to ensure changes are enacted, according to two perspectives published online May 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Teledermatology Could Cut Down on Patient Referrals

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Teledermatologic consultations might reduce patient referrals from a general practitioner to a dermatologist, according to research published in the May Archives of Dermatology.

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Hybrid Revascularization Procedures Seem Feasible

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- A hybrid approach to treating carotid and coronary artery disease with back-to-back procedures may be a feasible therapeutic strategy, according to research published in the May issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Statins May Cut Liver Cancer and Cholecystectomy Risks

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Statin use is associated with reduced risk for cholecystectomy and for liver cancer, according to two studies published in the May issue of Gastroenterology.

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Scans Correlate Well to Assess Spinal Deformity

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Computed tomography (CT) and radiography scans correlate well in assessing traumatic spinal deformity, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques.

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Pregnancy Linked to Poorer Thyroid, Parathyroid Outcomes

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who undergo thyroid or parathyroid surgery are more likely to have worse clinical outcomes than non-pregnant women in terms of complications and length of stay, according to research published in the May issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Westernization May Affect Asian Americans' Sun Habits

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Among Asian Americans, greater adoption of Western culture may be associated with practices that promote sun exposure, according to research published in the May Archives of Dermatology.

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ARBs Found Ineffective for Renal Function in Diabetes

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Two angiotensin receptor blockers are ineffective in reducing renal dysfunction in patients at high risk of vascular disease such as diabetics, according to two studies published online May 19 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Sticking to Work Hours Limits Very Costly

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to the 2003 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) limits on work hours, and other measures aimed at reducing fatigue among residents, would be costly with no proven benefits, according to an article published in the May 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Dipyridamole Can Cut Risk of Hemodialysis Stenosis

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of aspirin and dipyridamole can yield a modest reduction in the risk of arterovenous graft stenosis in patients undergoing hemodialysis, and can increase the duration of patency in new grafts, according to a study published in the May 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Genes Regulating Interleukin Linked to Biliary Cirrhosis

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Primary biliary cirrhosis may be linked to variants in the genes that regulate interleukin-12 signaling in the immune response, according to a study reported in the May 21 issue if the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Early Angiography Benefits High-Risk Coronary Patients

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- For high-risk patients with acute coronary syndrome, coronary angiography within hours after presentation can reduce the chance of subsequent death, heart attack and stroke, according to a study in the May 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Pain Management May Be Best Option for Critically Ill

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Pain management and end-of-life care may be the most beneficial treatment for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) and should focus on communicating with the patient and family and clearing up misconceptions about the use of palliative treatments, according to a review in the May issue of Chest.

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Antihypertensive Drugs Also Benefit Non-Hypertensives

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- In everyone at risk for heart attack or stroke -- including those with normal blood pressure -- antihypertensive treatment significantly reduces the risk of coronary heart disease events and stroke, according to a study published online May 19 in BMJ.

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Door-to-Balloon Delays Increase Risk of Death

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients admitted with ST elevation myocardial infarction, any delay in primary percutaneous coronary intervention is associated with an increased risk of death, according to a study published online May 19 in BMJ.

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Device, Surgery Both Found Effective in Sleep Apnea

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- The mandibular advancement device (MAD) is effective in the treatment of most obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), while surgery should be reserved for patients in whom conservative treatments have failed, according to studies reported in the May issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery.

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Prognosis Remains Poor in Gallbladder Cancer

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Median survival time for patients with gallbladder cancer has increased for more than four decades, but many patients still present with advanced disease and prognosis remains poor, according to a paper in the May Archives of Surgery.

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Personalized Support Helps Improve Diet and Fitness

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- An e-mail-based intervention with personalized content can help people eat more healthily and do more physical activity, according to a study published online May 19 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Findings Support Clopidogrel Guideline Recommendations

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- The use of clopidogrel in patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS) is associated with suitable ischemic reduction and bleeding outcomes to support its use before cardiac catheterization, even if patients should need coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), according to research published in the May 26 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Cardiorespiratory Fitness Reduces Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy adults with good rates of cardiorespiratory fitness have a lower risk of mortality from all causes, as well as from coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease, compared to their counterparts with inferior cardiorespiratory fitness, according to a study published in the May 20 issue of JAMA.

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Benefits Seen in Myocardial Bone Marrow Cell Injections

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Injections of bone marrow cells into the myocardium of patients with chronic myocardial ischemia were associated with improved myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function, according to research published in the May 20 issue of JAMA.

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Can Help Treat Insomnia

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can help treat persistent insomnia, working best with medication in acute treatment but on its own over the long term, according to a study published in the May 20 issue of JAMA.

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Tamsulosin Linked to Problems After Cataract Surgery

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- The use of tamsulosin -- a common medication for benign prostatic hyperplasia -- is associated with a higher risk of serious adverse events following cataract surgery, according to research published in the May 20 issue of JAMA.

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Substance Abuse Seen in Schizophrenia, Violence Link

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- An association between schizophrenia and violent crime was chiefly seen in individuals with both schizophrenia and substance abuse, according to research published in the May 20 issue of JAMA.

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Low-Income Breast Cancer Patients Often Forgo Therapy

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- In low-income, insured women with breast cancer, the use of adjuvant hormonal therapy is low, according to a study published online May 18 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Cellular Pathway Essential for Myelin-Forming Cells

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Activation of a cellular signaling pathway is essential for the differentiation of myelin-forming oligodendrocytes, which could represent a target in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis, according to a study in the May 13 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

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Syphilis Screening During Pregnancy Beneficial

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Universal screening for syphilis during pregnancy is associated with reduced rates of congenital syphilis, supporting screening recommendations published in 2004, according to a review in the May 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Fast Weight Decline in Old Age May Increase Dementia Risk

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Higher body mass index (BMI) late in life is associated with a lowered risk of developing dementia with further aging, according to a study reported in the May 19 issue of Neurology.

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Hyperkyphosis, Spinal Fracture Linked to Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Older women with hyperkyphosis and a history of vertebral fractures may have a higher risk of death, according to research published in the May 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Coronary Artery Bypass Care Quality Not Tied to Quantity

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to quality measures in coronary artery bypass follow-up care results in similar mortality rates whether the procedure is performed at a high-volume or low-volume cardiac care center, according to a study reported in the May 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Splinting Brings Long-Term Relief to Arthritis of the Thumb

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Splinting the thumb for base-of-thumb osteoarthritis brings no significant short-term improvement but significantly reduces pain and improves hand function over the course of a year, according to a report published in the May 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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'Obesity Paradox' Makes Heart Disease Outlook Puzzling

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Although obesity is associated with poor cardiovascular health, an "obesity paradox" shows that obese individuals with certain cardiovascular diseases or risk factors may have a better prognosis than people with a healthy weight, according to a review published in the May 26 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Higher Bleed Risk in Women With Acute Coronary Syndrome

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Women with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) gained similar protection against ischemic events with bivalirudin compared to heparin plus a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor (GPI), with less bleeding, according to research published in the May 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Swine Flu Has Higher Fatality Rate Than Seasonal Flu

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- The fatality rate from H1N1 swine flu is slightly higher than the fatality rate from seasonal flu, according to United States' health officials, but they say most cases of swine flu are no worse than seasonal flu.

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Iron Not Linked to Survival in Primary Myelofibrosis

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Higher serum ferritin levels weren't associated with decreased survival in patients with primary myelofibrosis, which could be a finding that's relevant to ongoing discussions in hematology regarding the use of iron chelation, according to research published in the May issue of the American Journal of Hematology.

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Treatments Show Benefits in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Physical therapy and epidural steroid injections both appear to be useful treatments for individuals with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), according to research published in the May 1 issue of Spine.

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American Pain Society Offers Back Pain Treatment Guidance

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- The American Pain Society (APS) has issued a new series of recommendations to guide clinicians deciding among the various surgical and nonsurgical options for treating low back pain (LBP). The guidelines are presented in separate studies in the May 1 issue of Spine.

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Impaired Sense of Smell More Common With Lupus

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) may be more likely to have a decreased sense of smell compared to individuals without the condition, according to research published in the May issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Nurses in Kuwait Want More Professional Opportunities

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Among the multicultural population of nurses working in Kuwait, professional opportunities and extrinsic rewards are the greatest sources of dissatisfaction with work, according to a study published in the May issue of Applied Nursing Research.

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Elderly Patients Use Multiple Strategies to Combat Dyspnea

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease use a variety of techniques and strategies to cope with the dyspnea associated with their condition, according to a study published in the May issue of Applied Nursing Research.

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CDC: Thousands Sickened by Pool Chemical Exposures

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Thousands of people have sought treatment at hospital emergency departments or poison centers in recent years as a result of exposure to swimming pool chemicals, according to a study published in the May 15 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Adolescent Testosterone Enhances Adult Mating

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated testosterone before and during adolescence enhances male mating behavior in adulthood, while increased testosterone before adolescence affects the size of various brain areas associated with mating behavior in juveniles, according to a study published online May 7 in Endocrinology.

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Speech Therapy Exercises Relieve Sleep Apnea

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- The specialized exercises used in speech therapy can be adapted and used to reduce the symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), according to a study in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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HCV in Patients With Sustained Response Still Infective

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Trace quantities of hepatitis C virus (HCV) from patients with long-resolved chronic hepatitis C infection may still be infective, according to a study published in the May issue of Hepatology.

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Added Taxane Has No Survival Benefit in Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- The sequential addition of a taxane to adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy does not improve survival compared with standard chemotherapy in women with invasive operable breast cancer, according to a study in the May 16 issue of The Lancet.

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Common Viral Infection Increases Blood Pressure

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), found in more than 60 percent of adults, increases blood pressure, possibly through the renin-angiotensin system, according to a study published online May 15 in PLoS Pathogens.

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Virtual Laparoscopy Training Superior to Standard Training

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Danish gynecology students trained in laparoscopic surgery using a virtual simulator scored substantially higher on a proficiency scale than those receiving standard clinical training, according to research published online May 14 in BMJ.

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Maintaining Airway Pressure Benefits Post-Op Patients

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Maintaining positive airway pressure in patients after cardiac surgery can improve arterial oxygenation and reduce pulmonary complications, according to a study published in the May issue of Chest.

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Smokers' Lower Body Weight Linked to Airway Gene

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- The lower body weight in chronic smokers compared to nonsmokers may be caused by the increased expression of a gene in the airways that stimulates fat depletion, according to a study in the May issue of Chest.

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Patient Selection Crucial for Transcatheter AVR

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (AVR) is becoming an increasingly used option for patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis who aren't good candidates for surgical valve replacement, according to an overview published in the May 19 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Medicare Denies Coverage for 'Virtual Colonoscopy'

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced May 12 that it would not cover the cost of so-called "virtual colonoscopies," colon screenings using computed tomography scanning devices. The decision was immediately blasted by the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the American College of Radiology (ACR).

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Cement-Free Hip Replacement Has Good Long-Term Results

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Porous-coated acetabular metal shells inserted without the use of cement during total hip arthroplasty produce good long-term results, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Hypoglycemia More Common in Chronic Kidney Disease

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be at higher risk of hypoglycemia, even in the absence of diabetes, according to research published online May 7 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Late-Life Dementia Risk Index Developed

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have developed a risk index for Alzheimer's disease that could be used in targeted research and, someday, to determine prevention strategies, according to a study in the May 13 issue of Neurology.

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Climate Change Cited as World's Biggest Health Threat

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- During the 21st century, climate change will present the world's most important health challenge, according to a report published in the May 16 issue of The Lancet.

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Statins Slow Disease in Rheumatic Heart Disease

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with rheumatic aortic valve stenosis have a slower rate of disease progression if they take statins, according to a study in the May 19 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Hypothyroidism Linked to Liver Cancer in Women

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Hypothyroidism is associated with a three-fold higher risk of developing liver cancer in women, even among those without major risk factors, according to a study in the May issue of Hepatology.

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More Exercise May Provide Greater Gains in Heart Disease

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- A program featuring greater amounts of exercise and energy expenditure may be preferable to standard cardiac rehabilitation exercise in overweight patients with coronary heart disease, according to research published online May 11 in Circulation.

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Activity Helps Intensive Care Patients' Functional Outcomes

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) return to normal functioning faster when their sedation is interrupted daily by periods of physical activity, according to a study in the May 14 issue of The Lancet.

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Cerebrospinal Fluid May Help Pinpoint Alzheimer's Cases

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Levels of the cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers Aβ peptide 1-42 (Aβ42), tau, and phosphorylated tau may help predict which patients with very mild Alzheimer-type dementia may progress more rapidly to cognitive deficits and dementia, according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Swine Flu Spread Comparable to Pandemic Flu

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- The current swine flu outbreak originating in Mexico appears to spread substantially faster than seasonal flu and is comparable to the low end of pandemic flu outbreaks, although the virus appears to be less severe than the 1918 pandemic flu, according to a study published online May 11 in Science.

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Fatal Encephalitis in New York Man Linked to Deer Tick Virus

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- A report of a fatal case of encephalitis related to deer tick virus illustrates that the incidence of infection in humans may be underappreciated, according to research published in the May 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Standard Chemo Found Superior to Capecitabine

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Standard adjuvant chemotherapy was superior to capecitabine for treating older women with early breast cancer, though with substantial toxicity, according to research published in the May 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Big-City Residents May Have Later Cancer Presentation

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Residents of densely populated cities may have a higher risk of cancer diagnosis at a late stage than those in nonurban areas, according to research published online May 11 in the journal Cancer.

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Cancer Caregivers Show Excessive Inflammation

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Caregivers of patients with brain cancer show increased inflammation in the year after diagnosis that could put them at risk of developing conditions involving excessive inflammation, according to a study published online May 11 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Diabetes Linked to Death After a Heart Attack

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have had a heart attack have a higher risk of death or hospitalization for heart failure if they have diabetes mellitus, according to a study in the May issue of JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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History of Stroke Raises Mild Cognitive Impairment Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment is more common among those with a history of stroke than those without, while the APOE ε4 genotype is associated with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and memory loss, according to a study in the May Archives of Neurology.

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Women Are Forgoing Health Care More Than Men

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Cost-related access problems disproportionately affect women, with 52 percent in 2007 reporting problems gaining access to the heath care they needed, compared with 39 percent of men, according to a report published May 11 by The Commonwealth Fund.

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Interferon Reduces Quality of Life for Advanced Melanoma

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with advanced melanoma who are treated with pegylated interferon-alfa-2b have an improvement in recurrence-free survival but a reduction in quality of life compared with observation alone, according to a study published online May 11 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Early Breast Cancer Often Not Monitored After Surgery

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Women who undergo breast-conserving surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) often do not receive long-term surveillance mammography, according to a study published online May 11 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Diet May Protect Against Age-Related Macular Degeneration

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary intake may have an influence over the risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to two studies published in the May issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology, while a third study in the same issue indicates that cognitive impairment may share common risk factors with the eye condition.

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Role of Patent Foramen Ovale in Stroke Needs More Study

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Greater patient involvement in ongoing trials is needed to guide clinical decisions on the optimal treatment of patent foramen ovale (PFO) for stroke prevention, according to an advisory published online May 11 in Circulation.

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Three-Drug Regimen Helps Combat Chemotherapy Nausea

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of casopitant mesylate to dexamethasone and ondansetron causes a better reduction in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting than the latter two drugs alone, according to a study published online on May 11 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Exercise and Diet Support Slows Cancer Survivor Decline

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise, diet and weight loss support can slow the functional decline of long-term cancer survivors, according to a study in the May 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Extreme Estradiol Levels Raise Heart Failure Death Risk

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Men with heart failure and moderate levels of serum estradiol are at lower risk of death than their counterparts with particularly high and low levels of the hormone, according to a study in the May 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Aspirin Benefit in Peripheral Artery Disease Examined

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Aspirin therapy does not appear to significantly reduce cardiovascular events in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD), according to a study in the May 13 Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Information Technology Helps With Blood Pressure Control

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- An information technology-supported program helps hypertensive patients achieve blood pressure targets, according to a study published online May 5 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Simple Survey Assesses Adherence to Gluten-Free Diet

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- A simple seven-question tool may be effective in assessing gluten-free diet adherence among individuals with celiac disease, according to research published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Antioxidants Block Beneficial Effects of Exercise

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Oxidative stress resulting from exercise increases insulin sensitivity and promotes the body's own antioxidant defense, a response that is blocked by taking antioxidants such as vitamin C, according to a study published online May 11 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Principles for Effectiveness Research Published

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Comparative effectiveness research is a useful approach to improving health care, but should focus on benefiting patients and not minimizing cost, according to a policy statement published online May 11 in Circulation.

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Questionnaire Helps Patients Identify Health Priorities

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Asking patients if they want help with a specific addiction or mood disorder now or later helps them prioritize their health issues, according to a study published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine, while a second study shows that a 15-symptom questionnaire can help identify patients with somatoform disorders.

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Colorectal Cancer Death Risk Down in Bowel Disease

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has not significantly changed in recent decades, but the risk of CRC death has dropped substantially, according to a study published in the May issue of Gastroenterology.

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Acupuncture Beats Usual Care at Relieving Back Pain

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture, even simulated acupuncture using a toothpick, outperformed usual care in relieving low back pain according to a study in the May 11 Archives of Internal Medicine.

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More Cancer Screening Raises Odds of False Positives

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have 14 or more cancer screening tests have at least a 50 percent chance of a false-positive result, according to a study published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine, while another study in the same issue classifies the ways in which patients may contribute to errors in their medical care.

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Telemedicine Can Help Improve Stroke Care

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Telemedicine can be implemented within stroke-care systems to help fill the gaps in coverage, according to two articles published online on May 7 in Stroke. A third article published in the same online edition revisits the definition and evaluation of transient ischemic attack.

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Specific Diet May Reduce Risk of Heart Failure

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged and older Swedish women who adhere to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet are significantly less likely to develop heart failure, according to a study in the May 11 Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Drug Promotional Items Affect Medical Students' Preference

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students who are exposed to small branded promotional items from pharmaceutical companies may be more likely to hold favorable views of the advertised drug. However, the opposite effect may occur among students who attend schools with restrictive policies toward pharmaceutical marketing, according to a study published in the May 11 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Kidney Disease Preventive Care Linked to Heart Protection

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- People with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who receive preventive care may have a lower risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, according to research published online May 7 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Polyunsaturated Fats Linked to Lower Levels of Inflammation

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) from seafood were associated with lower levels of biomarkers of inflammation and endothelial activation, according to research published in the May 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Patient Perception Key Factor for Depression in Heart Failure

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Depression in heart failure patients appears to be more related to patients' perceptions of disease severity than objective measurements of severity, according to research published in the May 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Abnormal Bone Growth More Common in War Wounds

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- War wounds are more likely than civilian wounds to result in heterotopic ossification, and the complication is common among patients who undergo amputation as a result of blast injuries and those who undergo amputation within the zone of injury, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Conflicts of Interest Common in Published Cancer Research

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- A sizeable portion of cancer-related studies in major journals are marked by conflicts of interest, which may be associated with the types of research and outcomes presented in the studies, according to research published online May 11 in Cancer.

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Genetic Variants Linked to Blood Pressure

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Two genome-wide scans have identified loci associated with high blood pressure, according to two studies published online May 10 in Nature Genetics.

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Transporter of Toxic Molecules Damages Neurons

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- A protein that transports toxic molecules in the brain plays an important role in the neurodegeneration that occurs due to Parkinson's disease and methamphetamine abuse, according to a study published online April 29 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Number of Swine Flu Cases in U.S. Exceeds 2,500

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- The United States has surpassed Mexico to become the nation with the most confirmed cases of H1N1 swine flu, according to figures released May 11 by the World Health Organization (WHO).

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Diabetes Drug Reduces Insulin Secretion of β-Cells

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- The antidiabetic drug pioglitazone may preserve pancreatic β-cell function by reducing insulin secretion at intermediate glucose concentrations and reducing the energy metabolism of the cells, according to a study published online April 30 in Endocrinology.

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Arthritis, Fibromyalgia Linked to Computer Problems

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- People with arthritis or fibromyalgia often have discomfort or problems using computers, which could contribute to limitations at work, according to research published in the May 15 Arthritis Care & Research.

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NSAID Use Inhibits Post-Surgery Spine Fusion

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- The use of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac sodium for pain after vertebrae-fusing surgery appears to inhibit the successful fusion of the vertebrae, according to a study published in the May issue of The Spine Journal.

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Calorie-Restricted Diet Improves Insulin Sensitivity

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Calorie-restricted (CR) diets initially alter the insulin sensitivity of the liver and only later change the insulin sensitivity of muscles as the body adapts to the reduced caloric intake, according to a study published in the May issue of Gastroenterology.

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Rise in Syphilis Cases Due to Heterosexual Contact

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Data on rates of syphilis in Jefferson County, Ala., indicate a re-emergence of the disease among women and heterosexual men, according to a report in the May 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Learning to Read CT Angiograms a Lengthy Process

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Developing skill in reading coronary computed tomographic (CT) angiograms is a slow process and may require more training and practice than provided in a typical one-year fellowship, according to a study reported in the May issue of Radiology.

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Spinal Outcomes Linked to Pre-Surgery Time Off

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with symptomatic disc degeneration have a greater improvement in pain and disability after surgery if they were off work less than 13 weeks before surgery, according to a study in the May issue of The Spine Journal.

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Bad Lot of West Nile Tests Gave False-Positive Results

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- A faulty batch of West Nile virus test kits that were used from July to September 2008 resulted in hundreds of false-positive test results, according to a study published in the May 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Arthritis Affects Male and Female Workers Differently

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Roughly half of individuals with arthritis disability may be out of the labor force, and arthritis may influence men's and women's employment experience in different ways, according to research published in the May 15 issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Childhood Body Mass Index Screening Needs Improvement

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Before a statewide childhood body mass index (BMI) screening system can be put in place in Florida, screening activities need to be improved at a local level, according to a report in the May 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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PAD Frequently Undiagnosed in Heart Disease Patients

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- As many as one in six patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) may have overlooked peripheral arterial disease (PAD) despite specialist cardiovascular care, according to a study published in the May issue of Catheterization & Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Low-Dose Aspirin May Damage the Small Intestine

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Even a short course of low-dose aspirin therapy may damage the small intestine, according to a study published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Target of Inhibitors of Memory Loss Identified

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- One member of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family, which represses gene expression, has been identified as a negative regulator of learning and memory and can be targeted by inhibitors leading to enhanced learning and memory, according to a study in the May 7 issue of Nature.

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Key Nutrients Lower Risk of Macular Degeneration

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- The intake of certain key nutrients can reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and that risk can be correlated with a nutrient compound score devised by researchers and reported in the May issue of Ophthalmology.

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Better Treatment of Brain Hemorrhage Needed

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Given that death rates for patients with non-traumatic cerebral hemorrhage have not improved in the last decade, better clinical management is needed to reduce death and increase functional survival, according to a study in the May 9 issue of The Lancet.

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Monthly Testosterone Effective as a Male Contraceptive

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Monthly injections of testosterone can provide effective reversible contraception for healthy fertile men without adverse effects, according to a study first published online on March 17 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Three Genes Linked to Breast Cancer Metastases

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Three different genes may mediate the spread of breast cancer to the brain, according to a study published online May 6 in Nature.

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Death Rate After Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation 1 in 1,000

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- While most patients with focal atrial tachycardia recover left ventricular function after catheter ablation, 1 in 1,000 patients with atrial fibrillation die, according to two studies in the May 12 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract - Medi
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Abstract - Cappato
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Home UVB Therapy Is Feasible for Psoriasis Patients

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with mild-to-severe psoriasis, home-based and clinic-based ultraviolet B (UVB) phototherapy are equally safe and effective, but home-based therapy may be associated with greater patient satisfaction, according to a study published online May 7 in BMJ.

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Low Intake of Vitamins A and C May Increase Risk of Asthma

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Low dietary intake of vitamins A and C is associated with higher odds of asthma, according to a study published online on April 30 in Thorax which contradicts the findings of a large study published last year.

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Triple-Reassortant Swine Virus Seen Since 2005 in US

THURSDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Eleven cases of infection similar to the swine flu outbreak currently under way -- triple-reassortant swine influenza A (H1) viruses -- have been documented since 2005 in the United States, according to a study led by researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta and released May 7 by the New England Journal of Medicine. This study was accompanied by another study, two editorials, and three perspectives focused on the swine flu outbreak.

NEJM.org
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Drug-Eluting Stents Beneficial for Off-Label Use

THURSDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Patients implanted with drug-eluting stents for off-label indications have lower rates of repeat target vessel revascularization and death without affecting the heart attack rate compared with bare-metal stents, according to a study in the May 12 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Correct Diagnosis of Syncope Important for Treatment

THURSDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Although difficult, correctly diagnosing the cause of syncope, a transient lack of consciousness followed by a quick recovery, is important in initiating effective treatment, according to a review in the May 12 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Routine Glaucoma Assessment Deemed Cost-Effective

THURSDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Routine care to delay or prevent the incidence of glaucoma is cost-effective in comparison to the costs of not providing the care, both in terms of resource utilization and quality-of-life measures, according to a study in the May issue of Ophthalmology.

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No Clear Benefit to Renal Artery Stents

THURSDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with renal artery stenosis do not benefit from renal artery stent placement and are at risk for procedure-related complications, according to a study published online on May 5 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Premenstrual Syndrome Relapse Affected by Treatment Length

THURSDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Women with premenstrual syndrome had a higher relapse rate after short-term sertraline treatment compared with long-term treatment, according to research published in the May Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Drug-Eluting Stents May Help Prevent Restenosis

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Drug-eluting stents had lower rates of restenosis and lower rates of lesion and vessel revascularization in head-to-head trials against bare-metal stents in two studies published in the May 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Stone
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Abstract - James
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Visceral Fat-Depression Link Explored in Women

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged women with depression tend to have more visceral fat than their nondepressed counterparts, which could explain why they are at higher risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online April 27 in Psychosomatic Medicine.

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Little Evidence to Support Some H1N1 Flu Measures

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Some of the interventions that have been introduced in the wake of the outbreak of H1N1 flu have little or no evidence to support them, according to an editorial published online May 5 in The Lancet, while a report in the same journal asks whether or not the international response to the outbreak was fast enough.

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Screening Can Spot Those Most at Risk for Missed Work

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- A brief screening questionnaire can identify workers with chronic low back pain who are most at risk for long periods of missed work, according to a study published in the May issue of The Spine Journal.

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CDC Confirms Over 400 H1N1 Flu Cases

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- As of May 5, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed 403 cases of H1N1 flu nationally in 38 states, with over 700 additional probable cases which, if confirmed, will mean the disease has spread across 44 states. The CDC continues to urge the public to rigorously observe preventive measures.

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Post-Hospital Housing Helps Chronically Ill Homeless

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Post-hospitalization housing assistance for homeless people with chronic illnesses results in fewer subsequent emergency department visits and hospitalizations, according to a study published in the May 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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High Urine Albumin Linked to Venous Thromboembolism

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Already a recognized risk factor for arterial thromboembolism, microalbuminuria also is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE), according to a study published in the May 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Heart Arrhythmias Increase Mortality in Catheterizations

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT/VF) during and after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with higher death rates within 90 days, according to a study published in the May 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Delirium May Accelerate Decline in Alzheimer's Disease

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Alzheimer's disease have a greater acceleration in cognitive decline after an episode of delirium, according to a study in the May 5 issue of Neurology.

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Medical Center Press Releases Often Lacking Key Details

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Press releases from academic medical centers may often overstate the importance of research findings while failing to acknowledge relevant limitations of the studies, according to research published in the May 5 Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Evidence Supports Folic Acid for Neural Tube Protection

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- New evidence continues to support the use of folic acid supplementation for preventing neural tube defects, according to research published in the May 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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TGF-β Signal Disruption Linked to Faster Cancer Growth

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- In mice, disruption of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling may encourage the growth of diffuse-type gastric carcinoma, according to research published in the April 15 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Molecular Markers Linked to Death From Prostate Cancer

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Several molecular factors measured in prostate cancer biopsy specimens at diagnosis may point to a higher long-term risk of death, according to research published in the May 5 Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Modified Protocol Improves Cardiac Arrest Survival

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Modified guidelines on the out-of-hospital management of cardiac arrest patients that optimizes compressions and reduces disruption improves survival rates, according to a study published online on May 4 in Circulation.

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Genotype Linked to Cardiac Surgery Outcomes

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who were homozygous for the low activity catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) L allele had a higher risk of vasodilatory shock and acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, according to research published online April 30 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Pancreas Graft Function Affects Survival in Diabetics

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 1 diabetes and severe renal dysfunction who receive a simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant have better survival if the pancreas remains functional a year after the transplant, according to a study published online ahead of print April 30 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Evidence Supports Heritability of Breast-Tissue Composition

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Breast water -- which is correlated with mammographic density -- is higher in young women, which may point to a factor related to susceptibility to breast carcinogens at younger ages, according to research published online April 30 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Alcohol Abstention Advice to Pregnant Women Paternalistic

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Advising pregnant women to abstain entirely from alcohol is both paternalistic and ethically dubious, according to an article published in the May issue of the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Number of US Swine Flu Cases Climbs to 286 in 36 states

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- The confirmed number of swine flu cases in the United States swelled to 245 in 35 states by May 3, but federal health officials are expressing cautious optimism that the disease may be leveling off and may not be as dangerous as initially feared. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has updated the number of confirmed national cases to 286 in 36 states as of late this morning.

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Progesterone Activator Involved in Endometriosis

MONDAY, MAY 4 (HealthDay News) -- Women with endometriosis have impaired expression and cycle-dependent regulation of a progesterone receptor co-activator, which may explain progesterone resistance in endometrium from these women, according to a study published online April 23 in Endocrinology.

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Income, Education Associated With Diet Cost and Quality

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- People with higher socioeconomic status and educational levels are more likely to consume a costly but high-quality diet of lower-energy-density foods, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Wine Linked to Five-Year Bump in Men's Life Expectancy

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking wine may be associated with lower risk of cardiovascular-related death, according to research published online April 30 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Chronic Kidney Disease Linked to Higher Risk of Cancer

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate chronic kidney disease may raise older men's risk of cancer by nearly 40 percent, according to research published online April 30 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Chemical Explains Problems After External Circulation

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Cyclohexanone, a compound used to make intravenous bags and extracorporeal circulation equipment, can leach into the contained fluids and cause cardiovascular morbidities similar to those observed after extracorporeal circulation, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

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Working While Ill Linked to Later Sickness Absences

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Employees who come to work sick may run a higher risk of later long-term sickness absences, according to research published in the May issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Cetuximab May Improve Survival in Advanced Lung Cancer

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy and cetuximab (Erbitux) survived significantly longer than patients treated with chemotherapy alone, according to a multinational study reported in the May 2 issue of The Lancet.

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Depression Types Can Be Discerned by Brain Blood Flow

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Refractory and nonrefractory depressive disorder are distinguished by differing perfusion in the regions of the brain, which might be useful in diagnosis and customizing therapy, according to a study reported in the May issue of Radiology.

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Erythropoietin May Worsen Mortality in Cancer Patients

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- The use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents to treat anemia in cancer patients worsens mortality, according to two separate reviews of past clinical studies.

Abstract - Bohlius (The Lancet)
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Wrong Approach to Obesity Can Alienate Patients

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- When physicians tackle the issue of obesity with their black patients, they may unintentionally alienate them if they do not use the right timing and approach, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Recommended Drug Therapy Low in A-Fib, Heart Failure

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with atrial fibrillation and heart failure may be undertreated, and such patients have a higher mortality risk than those with only atrial fibrillation, according to research published in the May 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Folate Levels Linked to Markers of Asthma

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- High blood folate levels are associated with lower levels of markers of allergy, according to a study published online May 1 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Inhibitor May Have Use Against Head, Neck Cancers

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- The histone deacetylase inhibitor LBH589, which has been shown to be useful against some hematologic cancers, may hold potential for treating head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), according to research published online ahead of print March 16 in the Journal of Pathology.

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H1N1 Flu Poses Major Surveillance Challenge

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Containment of the influenza A strain H1N1, or swine flu, outbreak is probably impossible because cases are already geographically widespread and countries with fragile health systems lack the ability to properly conduct surveillance and containment activities, according to an editorial published online April 30 in BMJ.

Editorial

More Americans Reporting Disability

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- The number of Americans reporting disabilities rose by 7.7 percent from 44.1 million in 1999 to 47.5 million in 2005, according to a report in the May 1 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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CDC: More Than 100 H1N1 Flu Infections in US

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- As of Thursday, April 30, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed 109 cases of influenza A strain H1N1, or swine flu, in the United States, with 50 cases in New York, 26 in Texas, 14 in California, 10 in South Carolina, and the rest in seven other states. So far, only one death has been recorded.

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Drug-Eluting Stents Stack Up Well Against Bare-Metal Stents

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- The use of drug-eluting stents (DES) appears safe and efficacious compared to bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to research published in the May 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Physician's Briefing