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October 2009 Briefing - Internal Medicine

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Internal Medicine for October 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Endorectal Imaging Benefit Seen in Prostate Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Endorectal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may be useful in categorizing men with stage T1c prostate cancer for proper treatment management, according to research published in the November issue of Radiology.

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Working After Retirement Associated With Better Health

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Retirees who engage in bridge employment tend to have better health than those who cease work completely, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology.

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Benefits Seen From Concurrent Chemotherapy and Radiation

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer who hadn't undergone surgery, concurrent radiotherapy and non-platinum chemotherapy was associated with fewer recurrences and deaths over 10 years, according to research published online Oct. 28 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Self-Reports Underestimate Number of Pregnant Smokers

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Relying on women to self-report whether they smoke results in many pregnant smokers going undetected each year, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in BMJ.

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Surgery Not Found to Affect Cognitive Function in Elderly

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Non-cardiac surgery and major illness have no long-term effect on cognitive function in the elderly, including those with mild dementia, according to a study in the November issue of Anesthesiology.

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Maternal Ethnicity and Weight Can Affect Pain and Labor

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Asian women and heavier women have slower labor and report less pain, but ethnicity and weight do not explain the substantial differences observed between women, according to a study in the November issue of Anesthesiology.

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Swine Flu Radiographic and CT Imaging Patterns Studied

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in one or both lungs with consolidation are the most common computed radiographic (CR) and computed tomography (CT) images of patients with swine-origin influenza A (S-OIV), according to a study to be published in the December issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

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Tai Chi Can Improve Pain and Function in Knee Arthritis

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The ancient Chinese exercise practice Tai Chi can reduce pain, preserve functionality, and improve personal well-being among subjects with knee osteoarthritis, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Study Finds Benefits With Full-Field Digital Mammography

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Full-field digital mammography (FFDM), along with computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), may provide improved detection of microcalcifications and ductal carcinoma in situ, according to research published in the November issue of Radiology.

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Additional Recommendations for Imaging on the Rise

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Recommendations for additional imaging in radiology reports at one institution increased steeply in recent years, and from 1980 to 2006, radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures increased roughly 10-fold and 2.5 fold, respectively, according to two studies the November issue of Radiology.

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Study Analyzes Role of STAT3 Genetic Variants in Obesity

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Intake of dietary saturated fat may exacerbate the effects of certain gene mutations associated with body weight regulation and glucose homeostasis, according to a study in the November issue of the Journal of Nutrition.

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Vessel Type Linked to Disease Severity in Prostate Cancer

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Men with prostate tumors whose vascular supply consists of vessels with primitive morphology are more likely to develop lethal disease, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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ACE Inhibitors May Negatively Impact CABG Outcomes

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The preoperative use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor therapy before coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) may increase risk of mortality and other adverse outcomes, according to research published in the Nov. 3 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Lifestyle Changes Can Reduce Incidence of Diabetes

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle changes and metformin lead to weight loss and a reduced incidence of diabetes in high-risk individuals that is maintained for 10 years, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in The Lancet.

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Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity Linked to Mortality

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Men with unfavorable prostate cancer whose prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels rapidly increase at recurrence have a higher risk of death, but only if they have no or minimal comorbidities, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Sex Hormones Link to Diabetes in Older Women Examined

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Adiposity and insulin resistance to varying degrees may explain the association of endogenous bioavailable testosterone (T) with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in postmenopausal women, but these factors do not completely explain the associations of estradiol (E2) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) with the condition, according to the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis published in the November issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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HIV Stigma May Still Impact Medical Care Negatively

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A stigma felt by HIV/AIDS patients may negatively impact their access to medical care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Pain Among Men and Women War Veterans Evaluated

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Among veterans of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF), women have a lower prevalence of overall pain, moderate-severe pain, and persistent pain compared to men, according to a study in the October issue of Pain Medicine.

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Overweight Patients May Have Effect on Doctor's Attitude

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have lower respect for patients with high body mass index (BMI), which may have an impact on patient care and outcomes, according to a study published online Sept. 18 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Helps Overcome Winter Blues

THURSDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with seasonal affective disorder who undergo a one-year course of cognitive behavioral therapy, either on its own or in combination with light therapy, are less likely to have a recurrence of winter depression than their counterparts who undergo light therapy alone, according to a study in the September issue of Behavior Therapy.

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Male Foreskin Size Can Affect Risk of HIV Infection

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Men with larger foreskins are at higher risk of being infected with HIV, according to a study in the Oct. 23 issue of AIDS.

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Post-Exposure Prophylaxis of HIV Transmission Spotlighted

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have a one-time sexual encounter with a person who is highly likely to be HIV-positive should initiate post-exposure prophylaxis as soon as possible, according to a feature article published in the Oct. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Genetic Mutation Linked to Severe Candidasis

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Impaired dectin-1 signaling may be responsible for severe mucocutaneous fungal infections, according to two reports published in the Oct. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Abstract - Glocker
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Link Between Nicotinic Acid and Atherosclerosis Examined

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and atherosclerotic disease, daily use of high-dose nicotinic acid may help reduce atherosclerosis, according to research completed in the United Kingdom and published in the Nov. 3 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Racial Disparities Found in Breast Cancer Screening

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In a statewide screening program for low-income women in South Carolina, race appeared to affect the time to completion of diagnostic workup following suspicious breast abnormalities, according to research published online Oct. 26 in Cancer.

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Migraine With Aura Linked to Risk of Ischemic Stroke

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- People who have migraine headache with aura are at increased risk for ischemic stroke, particularly women, according to a meta-analysis of research on the links between migraines and cardiovascular disease published online Oct. 27 in BMJ.

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Importance of ST-Segment Resolution Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), ST-segment resolution at four hours after treatment may predict outcomes after fibrinolysis, but has limited prognostic value after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI), according to the DANish trial in Acute Myocardial Infarction-2 (DANAMI-2) substudy published in the Nov. 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Radiologists May Be Reluctant to Disclose Mammography Errors

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Few radiologists say they would definitely disclose an error affecting the diagnosis of a patient with breast cancer, according to a study in the Oct. 28 issue of Radiology.

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'Good' Cholesterol Levels May Boost Lipid Therapy Benefits

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- One of the key determinants of successfully preventing cardiovascular events with lipid therapy is raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, according to a study in the Oct. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Contralateral Breast Cancer Risk High With Gene Mutation

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women with cancer in one breast who come from families with a hereditary breast cancer mutation have a nearly 50 percent long-term risk of developing cancer in the opposite breast, particularly if they are younger at first diagnosis, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Clinicians Adhering More to Quality Improvement Program

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that are participants in the "Get With The Guidelines" program are showing improvements in adherence over time for both men and women as well as younger and older patients, according to a study published online Oct. 27 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Testicular Cancer Survivors Report High Quality of Life

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term survivors of testicular cancer generally report a high quality of life, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Hormone Deficiency Shown to Impair Heart Function

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Lack of adiponectin, an adipose-derived plasma protein that exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-hypertrophic effects, in aldosterone-induced hypertension worsens left ventricular hypertrophy and heart function in mice, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in Endocrinology.

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Noncardiovascular Deaths Add to Dialysis Patient Mortality

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- High overall death rates among patients beginning dialysis are not just the result of higher cardiovascular death rates, but of significantly higher noncardiovascular death rates as well, according to a study in the Oct. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Majority of Americans Within Two Hours of a Burn Center

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Seventy-nine percent of Americans are within two hours of an American Burn Association-verified care center, but access varies considerably by region and state, according to a study in the Oct. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Venous Thromboembolism Risk Varies With Body Type

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- There is a positive, dose-dependent association between risk of venous thromboembolism and all the measurements of obesity, such as waist and hip circumference, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in Circulation.

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Rising Down's Syndrome Trend as Maternal Age Increases

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Although there has been an increase in the incidence of Down's syndrome in the United Kingdom since 1989, improved screening has offset the rise and the number of Down's syndrome births has slightly declined, according to a study published Oct. 26 in BMJ.

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Homelessness, Marginal Housing Affect Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- People living in shelters for the homeless and other marginal housing such as rooming houses and hotels are at higher risk of mortality than low income status alone can account for, according to a study published Oct. 26 in BMJ.

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Rate of Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease Evaluated

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and Alzheimer's disease, the presence of DM slows the rate of cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease, according to a prospective, multi-center study in the Oct. 27 issue of Neurology.

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Deep Brain Stimulation May Help in Tourette Syndrome

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Thalamic deep brain stimulation reduces tic severity in patients with severe and refractory Tourette syndrome, and also improves symptoms of anxiety and depression, according to a study in the Oct. 27 issue of Neurology.

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Gender Gap in Midlife Heart Disease Risk Is Narrowing

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of midlife myocardial infarction is increasing for women, and vascular risk factor prevention should be given a higher priority, according to a study in the Oct. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Neonatal Aluminum Exposure May Affect Later Bone Health

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Preterm infants who are exposed to parenteral aluminum may have an increased risk of reduced lumbar spine and hip bone mass during adolescence, according to a study in the November issue of Pediatrics.

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Decline in Cardiorespiratory Fitness Speeds Up After 45

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Aging does not necessarily spell a linear decline in cardiorespiratory fitness, with lifestyle factors playing an important role, according to a study in the Oct. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Medical School Enrollment Continues to Expand

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 18,400 students enrolled in medical school in the United States in 2009, a 2 percent increase over the previous year, but even more expansion is needed to meet future demand, according to an Oct. 20 report from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Two Studies Focus on Factors Related to Colposcopy

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Younger women in an underserved population had a particularly high likelihood of colposcopic biopsy after cervical cancer screening compared to a repeat Pap test, and multiple biopsies during colposcopy were not associated with a higher risk of new human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, according to the results of two studies published in the November Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract - Trivers
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Cortisol Linked to Bone Loss in Women With Anorexia

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Cortisol levels are higher in women with anorexia nervosa and hypothalamic amenorrhea than healthy women, and are strongly associated with depression, anxiety and bone loss, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Low-Dose Regimen Found to Improve Myeloma Survival

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Lenalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone is associated with better survival than lenalidomide plus high-dose dexamethasone for treating newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Gene Therapy Shows Promise in Inherited Sight Disorder

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Gene therapy for a rare inherited sight disorder in which severely impaired vision in childhood usually results in blindness in adulthood can substantially improve vision, particularly in children, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in The Lancet.

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Coffee Drinking May Cut Risk of Liver Disease Progression

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- People with advanced hepatitis C-related liver disease who drink three or more cups of coffee a day have lower risk of disease progression than non-coffee drinkers, according to a study in the November issue of Hepatology.

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H1N1 Can Be Particular Threat to Transplant Recipients

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiothoracic surgeons should be vigilant for signs of the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus among their patients as the flu season approaches, and aggressively treat any cases, according to an article published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation.

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Far Fewer H1N1 Vaccine Doses Than Expected Are Available

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Because of production delays, far fewer than the goal of 40 million doses of H1N1 influenza vaccine will be available in the United States by the end of October, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued an emergency use authorization for the investigational antiviral drug peramivir intravenous in certain patients with suspected or confirmed H1N1 infection.

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Steroid Adherence in Difficult Asthma Cases Examined

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with difficult-to-control asthma, a significant proportion are non-adherent to inhaled and oral corticosteroid therapy, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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South Asians Show Higher Fat Mass Than Other Ethnicities

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- South Asians may have higher fat mass and lower lean mass than some other ethnic groups, which may be associated with increased Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) and insulin levels, according to a study published online Oct. 9 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Death After Bariatric Surgery in Extremely Obese Examined

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who undergo bariatric surgery, extreme obesity and a high burden of chronic disease is associated with an increased risk of death within one year post-surgery, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Broad Asthma Screening May Offer Minimal Health Gains

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The potential health benefits from asthma screenings in children seem to be smaller than previously expected, according to research published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Cocoa Can Reduce Levels of Inflammatory Biomarkers

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease, cocoa may significantly decrease levels of some inflammatory biomarkers, suggesting that the flavonoids in cocoa may help protect against atherosclerosis, according to a study in the Nov. 1 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Researchers Evaluate New Prostate Specific Antigen Test

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A new test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels is considerably more sensitive than commercial assays and allows better monitoring for recurrence after prostatectomy for early-stage prostate cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Hypertension and Cardiac Link During Pregnancy Analyzed

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a history of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy are at higher risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, particularly if the hypertension is recurrent, according to a Norwegian study in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Dutch Trial Does Not Appear to Sway View on Tonsil Surgery

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A 2004 trial finding equal benefits from adenotonsillectomy and watchful waiting in children moderately affected by throat infections or adenotonsillar enlargement had little effect on Dutch doctors' beliefs regarding the surgery, and tonsillectomy can treat vocal nasalance, according to two studies in the October Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Effect of Male Fetus on Twin Pregnancy Outcomes Studied

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Among twin pregnancies, the presence of a male fetus is associated with worse pregnancy outcomes such as prematurity and low birth weight, according to a study in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Childhood-Cancer Survivors at Risk of Suicidal Thoughts

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Adult survivors of childhood cancers are more likely to have thoughts of suicide, particularly if they are in poor mental and physical health, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Pediatric Post-Tonsillectomy Antibiotic Courses Compared

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric tonsillectomy patients who received three days of postoperative antibiotics needed no more pain medication and resumed normal activity as soon as patients who received a seven-day course, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Risks Associated With Thyroid Surgery in the Elderly Explored

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with more youthful patients, thyroid surgery presents few additional risks when performed in elderly patients, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Liraglutide Beneficial for Non-Diabetic Obese Adults

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In non-diabetic obese patients, treatment with liraglutide may significantly reduce weight, blood pressure, and symptoms of pre-diabetes, according to a study published online Oct. 23 in The Lancet.

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Neonatal Outcomes Examined in Cancer Pregnancies

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancies in women with cancer tend to have good outcomes overall, but have been associated with high rates of induced labor and newborn admission to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Two Treatments Can Improve Postviral Olfactory Loss

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of glucocorticoid treatment and Gingko biloba and glucocorticoid treatment alone are both effective in treating postviral olfactory loss, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Rough Microdermabrasion May Be Better for Skin Remodeling

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Using a coarse-grit hand piece to conduct microdermabrasion prompts sun-damaged skin to remodel itself in a process similar to wound healing, and may be more effective in dermal remodeling than medium-grit use, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Statins Not Associated With Surgical Site Infections

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In elderly patients who undergo elective surgery, statin use is not associated with an increased or decreased risk of surgical site infection, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Study Examines Adding Insulin to Oral Antidiabetic Therapy

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Type 2 diabetics on oral therapy appear to benefit most from the addition of basal insulin-based therapy, as compared to a prandial or biphasic insulin-based program, according to research published online Oct. 22 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Review Evaluates Systems of Care for STEMI Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In Europe and North America, improvements in systems of care may improve outcomes in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to a state-of-the-art paper published in the October issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Some Hospital Staff Predicted to Be Infection Superspreaders

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital staff such as therapists and radiologists who are in contact with all patients have the potential to be superspreaders of infection if they fail to wash their hands regularly, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Levels of Cardiac Troponin T Linked to Heart Failure Events

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Serum levels of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) are associated with increased risk of events for patients with stable heart failure, according to a study in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Remote Patient Monitoring May Lower Heart Failure Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure patients whose status was checked regularly using remote patient monitoring (RPM), had reduced risk of death and hospitalization compared to patients who received usual standard of care, according to a study in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Pulmonary Embolism Found to Be Often Unrelated to DVT

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with pulmonary embolism, only a few have deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the pelvic or proximal lower extremity veins, suggesting that pulmonary embolism originates in the lungs, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Pregnancy Weight Gain Can Affect Subsequent Retention

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Obese women who gain excessive amounts of weight during pregnancy are at increased risk of retaining weight at one-year postpartum, according to a study in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Causes of Heart Failure Patient Rehospitalizations Examined

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Most of the hospitalizations of heart failure patients subsequent to their diagnosis are for non-cardiovascular conditions, according to a study in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Obstetric Health Workers May Discourage Flu Vaccine

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Many obstetric health care workers may have negative attitudes toward flu vaccinations during pregnancy, and the prophylactic use of influenza antivirals in pregnant women after exposure to an infected individual appears cost-effective during a pandemic, according to two studies in the November Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Benefit of BRCA Testing in Ovarian Cancer Examined

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Testing women with ovarian cancer for the BRCA mutation if they have a personal history of breast cancer, a family history of breast or ovarian cancer, or are of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, is a cost-effective strategy that may prevent cancers in first degree relatives (FDR), according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Heart Attack Outcomes May Be Better With On-Site Surgery

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) have better outcomes if they present to a hospital with on-site cardiac surgery, according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Gene Mutations Associated With Parkinson's Disease

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene are associated with Parkinson's disease, and mutations are associated with earlier disease onset and atypical clinical symptoms, according to a study in the Oct. 22 New England Journal of Medicine.

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Novel H1N1 Vaccine Found Effective for Most Age Groups

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A new influenza A (H1N1) vaccine developed in China successfully generated a protective immune response in subjects ranging in age from 12 to 60 years, according to a study published online Oct. 21 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Higher Intensity Kidney Therapies Show Mixed Results

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In critically ill adults with acute renal injury, higher-intensity renal-replacement therapy does not reduce mortality; however, in children with chronic kidney disease, higher-intensity blood-pressure control has beneficial effects on renal function, according to two studies in the Oct. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Psychiatric Problems Affect Impact of Urinary Infections

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Psychiatric health problems and sexual trauma are common among women who present with lower urinary tract infections, and these issues have an effect on the impact of such infections, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in advance of the December print issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Diabetes May Not Influence Heart Disease Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes mellitus does not affect outcomes in patients with unprotected left main coronary artery stenosis treated with drug-eluting stents or coronary artery bypass, according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Most H1N1 Hospitalizations Are in Young Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of hospitalizations for H1N1 influenza are occurring in people younger than 25 years of age, and very few are occurring in the elderly, according to information presented at the Oct. 20 press briefing by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Supervised Exercise Found Helpful in Treating Knee Pain

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A program of supervised exercise is more effective than usual care in treating patellofemoral pain syndrome, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in BMJ.

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Cost, Efficacy of HPV Vaccine in Older Women Explored

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Giving human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccinations to older women may provide little absolute risk reduction at a high cost, according to a study in the Oct. 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Factors Contributing to Autism in Preterm Children Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The higher risk of autistic disorders related to premature birth may be largely due to higher rates of prenatal and neonatal complications, according to research completed in Sweden and published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Medical Resident Skin Cancer Exam Training Evaluated

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students and residents do not get consistent access to training in how to conduct a skin cancer examination, and need more education on how to look for skin cancer during routine medical examinations, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Clinical Approach for Invasive Fungal Disease Explored

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A clinically driven approach to neutropenia-induced invasive fungal disease (IFD) can expedite diagnosis and reduce unnecessary antifungal treatment compared to standard empirical and preemptive strategies, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Sources Find Different Numbers of Active Physicians

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Estimates from U.S. Census Bureau surveys find fewer older physicians remaining active compared with the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile data, according to research published in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cardiovascular Disease Linked to Hip Fracture Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of hip fracture is much higher for people who have a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study among Swedish twins reported in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Aldosterone Antagonists May Be Underused in Heart Failure

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Many heart failure patients are not receiving aldosterone antagonist therapy, though they may be candidates for it under professional prescribing guidelines, according to a study in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Omega-3 Augmentation of Antidepressant Evaluated

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Giving omega-3 fatty acids along with sertraline to patients with depression and coronary heart disease (CHD) did not augment the effect of the antidepressant, according to a study in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Effect of Microbicidal Wipes on Neonatal Sepsis Assessed

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Chlorhexidine vaginal and neonatal wipes are ineffective in preventing sepsis and bacterial colonization of newborns, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in The Lancet.

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Role of Antihypertensives in Stable Heart Disease Studied

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with stable ischemic heart disease and preserved ventricular function may benefit from angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, according to a review published online Oct. 20 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Childhood Hypertension Linked to Early Maturation

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Accelerated bone growth may serve as a predictor of primary hypertension in children and adolescents, according to a Polish study published online Oct. 19 in Hypertension.

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High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein May Predict Mortality

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In stroke-free middle-aged and older people, higher levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein are associated with a modestly increased risk of heart attack and death, but are not associated with an increased risk of stroke, according to a study published in the Oct. 20 issue of Neurology.

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Blood Mercury Not Found to Be Elevated in Autism

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Blood mercury levels are similar in children with autism or autism spectrum disorder (AU/ASD), non-autism developmental delays (DD) or typically developing (TD) controls, according to the Childhood Autism Risk from Genetics and the Environment study published online Oct. 19 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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HIV Vaccine Regimen Shows Modest Benefits

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A vaccine combination may decrease the risk of HIV infection in a community-based population that has a largely heterosexual risk, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the AIDS Vaccine Conference, held from Oct. 19 to 22 in Paris.

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Guidelines Offered for Erectile Dysfunction Therapy

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The American College of Physicians (ACP) recommends the use of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors in the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED), but the jury is still out on hormonal treatments for the condition, according to a pair of articles published online Oct. 20 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Smoking Linked to Sperm Harm in Men With Varicocele

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In men with varicocele, smoking more than 10 cigarettes daily was associated with a harmful effect on sperm motility and morphology, according to research published in the October issue of Urology.

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Drugs to Treat Bowel Disease Linked to Lymphomas

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Thiopurine drugs given as immunosuppressants to treat inflammatory bowel disease are associated with a more than five-fold risk of developing lymphomas, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in The Lancet.

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Melatonin Can Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Resistant Mice

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Melatonin, a hormone known for regulating sleep and wake cycles, improves insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in mice made insulin resistant through a high-fat diet, according to a study published online Oct. 9 in Endocrinology.

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Health Effects of Air Pollution on Obese People Studied

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The health impact of fine particulate matter appears to be worse for obese people than their normal-weight counterparts, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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CDC Says New Child Deaths Raise H1N1 Beyond Epidemic

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- As of Oct.16, 11 more children in the United States had died of H1N1 influenza in the past week, elevating the disease above epidemic proportions, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at an Oct. 16 news conference.

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Study Assesses Testicular Cancer Survivors' Symptoms

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Among survivors of testicular cancer, clinical symptoms of androgen deficiency were linked to sexual problems and older age, but not serum testosterone, according to research published in the October issue of Urology.

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Partner's Education Linked to Death Risk of Both in Couple

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Among married or cohabiting couples, women's education and men's social class appear to have an important effect on the mortality risk of both partners, according to research published online Oct. 6 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Electrical Stimulation Not Linked to Better Spinal Fusion

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Electrical stimulation following spinal fusion surgery wasn't effective in improving fusion rates in older patients, but was associated with a tendency toward better functional outcome, according to two articles published in the Oct. 1 issue of Spine.

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Fish Oil Deemed Safe for Antiplatelet Therapy Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with cardiovascular disease, the bleeding risk is not increased when high-dose fish oil is combined with aspirin and clopidogrel, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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HPV Vaccine's Effect on Genital Wart Rates Studied

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a significant decline in the number of cases of genital warts since 2007 when Australia introduced vaccination against four strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV) for girls aged 12 to 18 years and young women under the age of 26, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in Sexually Transmitted Infections.

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Role of Blood Transfusions for Bleed Complications Studied

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Blood transfusions used for the treatment of hematocrit level drops due to bleeding after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) do not result in improved mortality or myocardial infarction outcomes, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Morbidity Reduced for People Who Have Nearby Green Space

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Populations in areas with nearby green space tend to have a lower prevalence of common diseases and conditions, particularly depression and anxiety, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Coronary Angiography Found Safe in Chronic Kidney Disease

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Screening coronary angiography does not reduce renal function in high-risk patients with advanced chronic kidney disease awaiting a kidney transplant, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Lumbar Spondylolysis Rate Is 6 Percent in Japanese

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of lumbar spondylolysis, a crack in the lumbar vertebrae often caused by repeated stress, is about 6 percent in the Japanese, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of Spine.

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FDA Launches Drug Disposal Advice Web Page

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has launched a new Web page for consumers to educate them on the safe disposal of certain medicines that can be dangerous or even fatal if they end up in the wrong hands.

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Oncologists May Often Fail to Refer for Fertility Counseling

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Less than half of U.S. oncologists refer their cancer patients of childbearing age for counseling on fertility preservation, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Abdominal Pain Common in Childhood, Adolescence

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Both children and adolescents frequently experience abdominal pain, and it is a common cause of a visit to the doctor, according to a study in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Histological Response Linked to Fewer Hep B Complications

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic hepatitis B patients who have a biochemical or histological response to treatment are less likely to experience liver-related complications, according to a study in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Cell-Based Therapies May Be Beneficial in Alport Syndrome

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Cell-based therapies may offer hope to patients with Alport syndrome, according to an animal study published online Oct. 15 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Prediction Model Can Benefit Bladder Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In the management of bladder cancer patients who have undergone cystectomy, use of a multivariate prediction model ("bladder nomogram") for referral to adjuvant chemotherapy may lead to better outcomes than the use of pathologic stage, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Cancer.

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Optimal Medical Therapy Alone Feasible for Heart Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stable coronary disease, an initial strategy of optimal medical therapy alone does not increase the risk of death or heart attack; however, a high rate of such patients ultimately will require revascularization, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Corticosteroid Shot Helpful in Post-Pregnancy Back Pain

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Corticosteroid injections in the ischial spine can help relieve long-standing sacral low back pain that begins during pregnancy, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of Spine.

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Excess Weight's Role in Sleep-Disordered Breathing Studied

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Excess body weight may serve as a potentially important predictor of oxygen desaturation severity during sleep disturbances caused by apneas or hypopneas, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Intervention May Benefit Trial-Ineligible Heart Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction who are usually excluded from randomized controlled trials, primary percutaneous coronary intervention is associated with a lower rate of in-hospital death than thrombolytic therapy, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Study Finds Endoscopists Can Safely Sedate With Propofol

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Endoscopists can safely sedate patients with propofol during gastroenterological procedures, according to a study in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

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Smoking Bans May Reduce Heart Attacks in Nonsmokers

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking bans may effectively reduce the risk of heart disease and heart attacks attributable to secondhand smoke, according to a report released Oct. 15 by the Institute of Medicine.

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Serious Pathology Uncommon in Low Back Pain Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients presenting to primary care settings with acute low back pain, previously undiagnosed serious spinal pathology is rare, and commonly asked "red flag" screening questions may not identify it, according to a study in the October issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Study Links Text Messages and E-mails to Smoking Cessation

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- While short-term text message mobile phone interventions have been effective, further research needs to be completed to determine whether messages sent over mobile phones can help individuals with smoking cessation over the long term, according to research published online Oct. 7 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Normal-Tension Glaucoma Treatment Options Explored

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Untreated intraocular pressure and zone β variables of peripapillary atrophy may serve as risk factors for normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) in young individuals with moderate to severe vision loss, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Podcasts May Help in Weight Loss Battle

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Using a social cognitive theory-based podcast can help overweight people lose weight, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Interferon Beta Effects Explored in Multiple Sclerosis

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The effects of interferon beta on chemokine receptor genes and chemokine expression in peripheral immune cells may provide the therapeutic effect seen in multiple sclerosis treatment, according to a German study in the October issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Cognitive Factors Preceding Alzheimer's Disease Examined

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The onset of Alzheimer's disease can be seen on tests for several cognitive factors up to three years prior to clinical diagnosis, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Outcomes Studied in Nursing Home Patients With Dementia

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Nursing home residents with advanced dementia have a high mortality rate, and residents with end-stage renal disease who begin dialysis face a high risk of functional decline in the following year, according to two studies in the Oct. 15 New England Journal of Medicine.

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Interleukin-2 Not Linked to Clinical Benefits in HIV

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The use of interleukin-2 along with antiretroviral therapy in individuals with HIV is associated with greater CD4+ cell counts, but with no decrease in risk of opportunistic diseases or death compared to antiretroviral therapy alone, according to research published in the Oct. 15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Second-Line Diuretics in Hypertension Reviewed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of diuretics as a second-line approach to another anti-hypertensive agent further lowers systolic and diastolic blood pressure, providing the same effect as when used as first-line monotherapy, according to a review published online Oct. 7 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Urate Concentrations Linked to Parkinson's Progression

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- An increased concentration of the antioxidant urate in the serum or cerebral spinal fluid of a person with Parkinson's disease may slow the progression of clinical disability, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Folic Acid Blockers May Increase Risk of Birth Defects

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Drugs such as methotrexate and anti-epileptics that reduce folic acid levels during the first trimester of pregnancy more than double the risk of congenital abnormalities in the developing fetus, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Anesthesia Problems More Likely Early in Academic Year

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Undesirable events are more common among anesthesia trainees at the beginning of the academic year, even in those with more clinical experience, according to research published Oct. 13 in BMJ.

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Physician Detailing Improves Colonoscopy Screening Rates

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A series of detailing sessions to small urban physician practices about colorectal cancer (CRC) screening improved the practices' screening rates by 7 percent, but not cost-effectively, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Exercise Can Decrease Fatigue in Chemotherapy Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In cancer patients who are undergoing chemotherapy, a multi-modal exercise program may significantly reduce fatigue, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in BMJ.

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Study Links Sleep Environment to Sudden Infant Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In England, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is associated with potentially hazardous co-sleeping environments, including sharing a bed or sofa with a parent who has recently consumed alcohol or narcotics, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in BMJ.

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Acceptance of Prognosis Can Help Cancer Patients Cope

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with advanced cancer are more likely to be depressed and anxious if they have not come to terms with their situation, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Hospital Resource Use Variations Affect Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In elderly patients with heart failure, variations in hospital resource use have a significant effect on outcomes, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Possible Link Found Between Tumors and Mobile Phone Use

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- There is a possible link between mobile phone use and higher risk of tumors, but studies with a higher level of evidence are needed for confirmation, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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No Reduction Noted in Surgical Infection After High Oxygen

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Administering high levels of oxygen during and after abdominal surgery does not reduce the rate of infection or other complications, according to a study in the Oct. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Mixed Outcomes Seen for Less Invasive Prostate Surgery

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Although minimally invasive radical prostatectomy (MIRP) may be associated with some benefits compared to retropubic radical prostatectomy (RRP), it is also associated with more genitourinary complications, according to research published in the Oct. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Endovascular Aneurysm Repair May Reduce Early Mortality

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) reduced procedure time, hospital stay, and early postoperative mortality compared to open surgery, according to a study in the Oct. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Breast-Conserving Surgery, Mastectomy Rates Surveyed

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is attempted in the majority of patients, with factors linked to mastectomy including surgeon recommendation, personal decision and failure of BCS, according to results of a survey published in the Oct. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Physician Complication Rate Higher After Limited Sleep

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Complication rates are higher for attending physicians who have to work again less than six hours after the end of their shift the night before, according to a study in the Oct. 14 issue of Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Gene Variant Linked to Statin-Induced Side Effects

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Women and those with a variant of a liver-metabolizing enzyme have a higher risk of mild statin-associated side effects, particularly those associated with simvastatin, according to a study in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Prenatal Drug Exposure Linked to Children's Later Behaviors

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal substance exposure could lead to later behavioral problems in children through multiple pathways, according to research published online Oct. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Triple Therapy Beneficial in Chronic Pulmonary Disease

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), triple therapy with budesonide/formoterol added to tiotropium significantly improves lung function and reduces severe exacerbations compared to monotherapy with tiotropium, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Study Evaluates Hospital Quality and Mortality Rates

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital mortality rates in the United States have improved, although major differences in quality still exist between the best and worst hospitals, according to a report published Oct. 13 by HealthGrades.

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Early AMD May Increase Heart Disease Risk in Older Adults

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may be at higher risk of coronary heart disease, according to the Cardiovascular Health Study published in the October issue of Ophthalmology.

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Lifestyle Counseling May Help Obese With Weight Loss

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle counseling from a clinical practitioner targeting prevention of weight gain may help overweight and obese individuals lose or maintain their weight, according to the results of a Dutch randomized control trial published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Suppressing Kinase Activity May Slow Cardiac Aging

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Suppression of phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity in genetically-altered mice preserves cardiac function and prevents the appearance of other markers of cardiac aging, according to a study published online Oct. 12 in Circulation.

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Preoperative Biomarker Levels May Predict Cardiac Events

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with high preoperative levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) may be at a higher risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes within 30 days of non-cardiac surgery, according to a systematic review published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Practice Updates Issued for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- New research promises to improve the management of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, according to two Practice Parameter updates published in the Oct. 13 issue of Neurology.

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Visual Impairment May Affect Mortality Risk in Elders

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Visual impairment that cannot be corrected increases the odds of mortality in older adults, especially among those younger than 75, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Brain Seems to Play Role in Resveratrol's Diabetes Effect

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Resveratrol appears to exert an anti-diabetic effect in mice via the brain, with intracerebroventricular treatment improving hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, according to research published online Oct. 9 in Endocrinology.

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H1N1 Has Made Many Young Adult Patients Critically Ill

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The 2009 influenza A(H1N1) outbreak has put many young adult patients in intensive care with severe respiratory disease, leading to a high fatality rate, according to three studies published online Oct. 12 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Drugs for Malaria Prevention in Travelers Compared

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Atovaquone-proguanil and doxycycline appear to be relatively well-tolerated for malaria prophylaxis in travelers, and are less likely to cause neuropsychiatric effects than mefloquine, according to research published online Oct. 7 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Racial Disparities Persist in Prevalence of HIV Infection

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- More than 20 years after the identification of HIV, the racial disparity between African-Americans and Caucasians in HIV prevalence has persisted despite massive governmental and private efforts to contain the AIDS epidemic, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Survey Assesses Management of Liver Transplant Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Hepatologists overwhelmingly agree that primary care physicians should play a more active part in the management of common metabolic complications in liver transplant patients, according to a study published in the October issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Guided Imagery Program Can Help Ease Children's Belly Pain

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Adding a home-based guided imagery program to standard medical care was found to more effectively treat functional abdominal pain in children than medical care alone, according to research published online Oct. 12 in Pediatrics.

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Atypical β-Blocker May Improve Endothelial Function

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Nebivolol, a third generation β-blocker that has recently become available in the United States, offers a treatment alternative for hypertension, coronary artery disease and heart failure that goes beyond simple adrenergic blocking with direct vasodilation and stimulatory effects to improve arterial endothelial function, according to a paper in the Oct. 13 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Exercise Could Help Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- People with or without chronic kidney disease (CKD) who are physically inactive have higher odds of mortality than their more active counterparts, and there may be survival benefits for CKD patients who become more physically active, according to a study published online Oct. 9 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Retrovirus Linked to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A virus has been found in about two-thirds of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, according to a study published online Oct. 8 ahead of print in Science.

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Evidence Scant on Effects of Exercise After Stroke

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Aerobic exercise training that involves walking may improve walking ability in individuals following a stroke, but the effects of cardiorespiratory fitness training on death and disability remain unclear, according to research published online Oct. 7 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Health Care Disparities Among States Found to Be Widening

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing health care costs and growing disparities in coverage among U.S. states point to the urgent need for national health care reform, according to an Oct. 8 state-by-state report card from the Commonwealth Fund Commission, a private foundation supporting research on the health care system.

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Impact of Maternal Depression and Abuse on Children Studied

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- When mothers have mental health problems or are victims of family abuse, it negatively impacts the care and health of their children, according to a pair of studies in the October issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Oral Vaccine May Help Prevent Endemic Cholera

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- An inexpensive, locally-produced oral cholera vaccine may benefit populations threatened by endemic cholera, according to a double-blind Indian study published online Oct. 9 in The Lancet.

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Miscarriage Management Type Not Found to Affect Fertility

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have a miscarriage can be reassured that the type of miscarriage management they choose will not have an impact on their future fertility, according to a study published Oct. 8 in BMJ.

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Herpes Zoster Infection May Increase Risk of Stroke

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of stroke is higher in people who have had a herpes zoster infection than in those with no history of the disease, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in Stroke.

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Chemical in Plastics Linked to Behaviors in Young Girls

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Daughters born to women who were exposed in pregnancy to bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical found in polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resin, are more likely to exhibit aggressive and hyperactive behaviors as 2-year-olds, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Vaccinating Boys for HPV Is Not Found to Be Cost Effective

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccinating boys against human papillomavirus (HPV) exceeds value for money thresholds based on the information currently available, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in BMJ.

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Study Assesses Survival After Second Primary Neoplasms

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In survivors of childhood cancer, survival following second primary glioma is poor, though the outlook is good for second primary meningioma, according to research published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Cardiac Rehabilitation Underused but Beneficial

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Although cardiac rehabilitation, a medically supervised program to help heart patients recover and improve their functioning, is often not seen as an important component of comprehensive cardiac care and is underused, studies have shown clear benefits, according to a review published online Oct. 8 in Heart.

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Study Supports Surgery for Osgood-Schlatter Disease

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical treatment of unresolved Osgood-Schlatter disease in young adults typically results in excellent or good functional outcomes, with rare reoperations, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Study Explores Thrombus Healing by Plaque Type

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Thrombus healing in sudden cardiac death victims may depend on the presence of plaque ruptures or erosions, and, in some patients, call for different treatment approaches, according to research published online Oct. 7 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Effect of H1N1 on Southern Hemisphere ICUs Assessed

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- During the winter of 2009 in Australia and New Zealand, the H1N1 flu virus had a significant effect on hospital intensive care units, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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ACS Education May Not Reduce Prehospital Delay

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In patients at high risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS), educational and counseling intervention may not lead to decreased hospital arrival times or increased emergency medical services (EMS) use after the onset of symptoms, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Glatiramer Acetate May Delay Multiple Sclerosis Onset

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Early treatment with glatiramer acetate may delay the start of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS), according to the PreCISe study published online Oct. 7 in The Lancet.

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Cancer Patients at Risk of Jaw Necrosis After Treatment

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer patients treated with bisphosphonates have a higher risk of developing osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) if they have had dental extractions or dentures, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Seasonal Flu Vaccine Protects Somewhat Against A/H1N1

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- There are early signs that the 2008/2009 trivalent inactivated seasonal flu vaccination offers some protection against influenza A/H1N1, particularly in its most severe forms, but this should not be taken to mean that vaccination against swine flu is superfluous, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in BMJ.

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H2-Blockers Deemed Safe to Treat Pregnant Women

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- H2-blockers such as famotidine, ranitidine and cimetidine are safe to treat pregnant women for peptic ulcers or gastroesophageal reflux, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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COPD Combination Therapy Compared to Monotherapy

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) in combination with long-acting β2-agonist (LABA) did not improve mortality and had more adverse effects than LABA alone in the treatment of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a meta-analysis in the October issue of Chest.

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More Elderly Might Benefit From Stroke Treatment

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Given an aging population, the prevention and treatment of stroke in the very elderly -- who are under-represented in studies regarding therapy -- will become more important, according to research published online Oct. 2 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Model Can Predict Likelihood of Acute Heart Failure

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A mathematical model that considers clinical variables and levels of a biomarker can predict the likelihood of heart failure, particularly in patients judged as having intermediate probability, according to a study in the Oct. 13 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Childhood Trauma Linked to Premature Death

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple adverse childhood experiences such as abuse, witnessing domestic violence, parental separation or divorce, or growing up in a household where members are mentally ill, substance abusers, or sent to prison may be associated with premature death, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Medication Errors in Nursing Home Residents Assessed

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In the United Kingdom, more than two-thirds of nursing home residents may be exposed to medication errors, according to a study in the October issue of Quality and Safety in Health Care.

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Autoantibodies Against Osteoprotegerin Examined

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A case of osteoporosis with high bone turnover in a relatively young man with celiac disease suggests a possible role for autoantibodies against osteoprotegerin in osteoporosis in patients with this condition, according to research published in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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MicroRNA Biomarker Linked to Survival in Liver Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A microRNA biomarker has been identified in liver tumors, with differing levels by gender, and associated with survival and response to interferon treatment, according to a study in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Roundtable Discussion Tackles Health Care Reform

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The health care payment system, the role of consumers in responsible health care spending, and the use of comparative-effectiveness research were topics covered in a roundtable discussion with several health economics experts published in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Antibiotic Found Effective Against Lymphatic Filariasis

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The antibiotic doxycycline is an effective treatment against the lymphatic filarial parasite Mansonella perstans, according to a study in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Study Reports Lacking Benefit of ICD Early After Heart Attack

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) does not reduce the risk of death when given to high-risk patients within a month after a heart attack, according to a study in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Medical Students Want More Practice of Medicine Training

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students in the United States perceive that they are not getting enough training in the practice of medicine, particularly in medical economics, according to a study in the September issue of Academic Medicine.

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Depression, Anxiety May Raise Odds of Obesity

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- There is an association between common mental disorders such as depression and anxiety and the risk of future obesity, according to a study published Oct. 6 in BMJ.

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Many Chronic Low Back Pain Patients Recover Within a Year

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to common wisdom that patients with chronic low back pain can rarely recover, one-third of patients will recover in nine months, and four in 10 patients will recover within a year, according to a study published Oct. 6 in BMJ.

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Telephone Care and Therapy Help to Treat Depression

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The Mediterranean diet may protect against depression, while telephone care and counseling can help to treat it, according to two studies published in the October issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Cocaine Vaccines Not Effective or Long Lasting Enough

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Cocaine vaccination is only effective in a minority of patients and the effect is not sustained, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry, while a second study finds that naltrexone implants are more effective than oral doses of the drug in treating heroin addiction.

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Technique May Aid Detection of Residual Leukemia

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A technique that tags leukemia cells using antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles and allows them to be preferentially sampled greatly increases the ability to detect residual disease, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Cancer Research.

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Mother's Use of Antidepressant May Carry Risks for Newborn

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Newborns who have been exposed in utero to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) taken by their mothers are at higher risk for shorter gestational age, preterm delivery and admission to a neonatal intensive care unit, according to a study in the October Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Wrist Fractures Less Likely Evaluated for Osteoporosis

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Osteoporosis evaluation and management is less common in patients with wrist fractures than in those with hip and spine fractures, according to a national Korean cohort study published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Midlife Vision Linked to Early Childhood Factors

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal, childhood biological and social determinants may contribute to midlife visual function, according to a study in the October issue of Ophthalmology.

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Effectiveness and Cost Help to Make Coverage Decisions

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Countries using evidence-based cost-effectiveness and effectiveness to help make drug coverage decisions show how these factors can successfully support decision making and can also be adapted to the specific conditions of other countries, according to a study in the Oct. 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CYP2D6 Variants Linked With Tamoxifen Response

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with early-stage breast cancer undergoing adjuvant tamoxifen treatment, an association may exist between the polymorphic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) enzyme and clinical outcomes, according to a retrospective analysis published in the Oct. 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Premature Death in China Linked to Hypertension

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated blood pressure is one of the leading preventable risk factors for premature death in China, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in The Lancet.

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Novel Features of Breast Tissue May Predict Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Assessing the features of a woman's normal breast tissue can help to identify those at increased risk of breast cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Studies Examine Strategies Against Flu Pandemics

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccinating against H1N1 earlier this fall may save more money and avert more deaths than vaccinating later in the season, and expanded adjuvanted vaccination and antiviral prophylaxis could be beneficial in an influenza A (H5N1) pandemic, according to two studies published online Oct. 6 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Visual Loss Lower in Recently Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetics

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- People diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in more recent years have less prevalence of visual impairment than those diagnosed earlier, according to a study in the October issue of Ophthalmology.

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Non-Cardiac Incidental Results Rarely Clinically Significant

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Non-cardiac findings found by cardiac computed tomography (CT) are usually not clinically significant and have no impact on death rates, but can lead to complications and add to health care costs, according to a study in the Oct. 13 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Low-Contrast Visibility May Be Issue for Parkinson's Drivers

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Drivers with Parkinson's disease may be more prone to poor vehicle control and crashes while driving in low-contrast visibility conditions due to issues with perception, cognition and motor dysfunction, according to a study in the Oct. 6 issue of Neurology.

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Novel Risk Factors Not Found Useful for Heart Screening

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- After a systematic review of the research, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) finds there is insufficient evidence to support the use of any of nine novel risk factors in the routine screening of patients for coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a study in the Oct. 6 Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Expanded Health Coverage Could Save Money Later

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Expanding health coverage to adults may result in later savings from reduced Medicare spending on these individuals after they turn 65, especially for the uninsured with cardiovascular disease, diabetes or severe arthritis, according to research published online Oct. 6 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Augmentation of Antiemetic Drug Regimen Explored

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of casopitant, a neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor antagonist, to an antiemetic regimen of dexamethasone and ondansetron reduced vomiting and use of rescue medications in breast cancer patients undergoing their first cycle of chemotherapy, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Mercury Linked to High Blood Pressure in Native Canadians

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- High exposure to environmental mercury in Canadian Inuits, which is due to their traditional diet of fish, is associated with high blood pressure, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Hypertension.

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Untreated Sleep Disorder Can Impair Driving Ability

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients are more prone to the effects of alcohol consumption and sleep restriction on driving performance than healthy individuals, according to a study in the Oct. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Latinas Found Less Likely to Receive Breast Reconstruction

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Less acculturated Latinas with breast cancer are less likely to receive breast reconstruction than Caucasian women but are most likely to want more information about it, and underweight Korean breast cancer patients are at higher risk of death and breast cancer recurrence, according to two studies published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructions Increasing

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- During the period of 1997 to 2006, the rate of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction significantly increased, and subsequent knee surgery was required more often among younger patients and those treated by a lower-volume surgeon or at a lower-volume hospital, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Report Finds Invasive MRSA Infections on the Rise in Iowa

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Invasive community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is an increasing public health threat in Iowa, according to a study in the October issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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T'ai Chi Program May Benefit Type 2 Diabetes Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 2 diabetes, t'ai chi may serve as an alternative exercise program to improve glucose control, self-care activities, and quality of life, according to a Korean study published in the June 14 issue of the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.

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Appetite Hormone May Affect Peripheral Fat Metabolism

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- When administered directly into the brain, the appetite hormone ghrelin regulates peripheral fat metabolism largely independently of growth hormone, according to a study in the October issue of Endocrinology.

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Nicotine Replacement in Pregnant Smokers Likely Safe

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Nicotine replacement therapy does not increase the risk of adverse events in pregnant smokers, according to a study in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Combination May Improve Prostate Cancer Prediction

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Combining endorectal MRI, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and a low free-to-total prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ratio is highly accurate in predicting prostate cancer in men with high PSA levels, according to a European study in the October issue of Radiology.

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Use of Platelet-Rich Plasma in Sports Medicine Increasing

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is being increasingly used in sports medicine, even though minimal clinical evidence exists that it can enhance healing, according to a review in the October issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

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Prevalence of Alcohol as Self-Medication for Pain Assessed

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The use of alcohol as a self-management strategy for orofacial pain and arthritis raises concerns about potential interactions between alcohol and pain medications, according to research published in the September issue of the Journal of Pain.

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Cardiovascular Risk Factors Studied in Ex-Football Players

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to community controls, retired National Football League (NFL) players have significantly fewer cardiovascular risk factors; but, they have a similar prevalence of coronary atherosclerosis, according to a study in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Heroin, Crack Treatment Often Successful in Short Term

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Heroin and crack cocaine addiction can be successfully treated in the short term with either pharmacological or psychosocial methods, but treatments are less successful in those with addictions to both drugs, according to a study published online Oct. 2 in The Lancet.

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Resynchronization Can Slow Heart Failure Progression

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) improves clinical outcomes, as well as left ventricular function and size, in patients with asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic left ventricular dysfunction, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Procedure May Be Helpful in Diagnosing Prostate Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Transurethral prostate resection may be a useful addition to prostate biopsy in detecting cancer in men whose prostate-specific antigen (PSA) remains a concern after previous negative biopsies, according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Technique Found Effective for Intracranial Aneurysms

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Stent-assisted coil embolization is a safe and effective treatment for wide-necked intracranial aneurysms occurring during subarachnoid hemorrhage that are difficult to treat by other techniques, according to a study in the October issue of Radiology.

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Rising Numbers of Elderly Will Pose Issues for Nations

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- An anticipated rise in life expectancy, involving more than half of babies born in wealthy nations living to 100, will cause societal and economic challenges in coming decades, according to research published in the Oct. 3 issue of The Lancet.

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Smoking Adds to Social Inequalities in Stillbirth Rates

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking during pregnancy accounts for 38 percent of the social inequality in the rate of stillbirths, and 31 percent of infant death inequality, according to a study published online on Oct. 1 in BMJ.

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High-Status Children More Likely to Be Healthier Adults

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Children with the highest status among their peers are at lower risk for disease in adulthood, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Vitamin D Can Help Reduce Falls in Older Adults

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D supplementation of between 700 and 1,000 IU can significantly reduce the risk of falls in older adults, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in BMJ.

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Weight Loss Tied to Improved Sleep Apnea in Diabetics

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- A decrease in apnea and hypopnea events in obese diabetic adults assigned to an intensive weight loss intervention provides further evidence that weight loss leads to significant improvements in obstructive sleep apnea, according to research published in the Sept. 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Food Habits Studied in Children of Working Parents

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose mothers work full-time or part-time are more likely to have unhealthy eating habits compared to the offspring of stay-at-home mothers, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Drug Tied to Lower Colectomy Rate in Ulcerative Colitis

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis, treatment with infliximab is associated with a significantly lower likelihood of undergoing colectomy within one year, according to a study published in the October Gastroenterology.

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Kidney Disease Risk May Be Higher in Allergic Diabetics

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In male diabetics, there is a correlation between eosinophil counts and microalbuminuria that may point to increased risk of diabetic kidney disease in those with allergic rhinitis or asthma, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Smoking Cessation Drug Likely Doesn't Raise Self-Harm Odds

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The smoking cessation drug varenicline is likely not associated with increased risk of self-harm, although a two-fold increased risk cannot be ruled out, according to a study published Oct. 2 in BMJ.

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Female Diabetics More Likely to Develop Atrial Fibrillation

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with diabetes, women -- but not men -- have a significantly increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation, according to a study published in the October issue of Diabetes Care.

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Exercise Can Slow Bone Loss in Breast-Feeding Mothers

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Breast-feeding mothers who engage in resistance and aerobic exercise lose less bone mineral density than their sedentary counterparts, according to a study in the October issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

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Low Late Toxicity With Radiation Post Prostatectomy

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Men with prostate cancer who receive salvage external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after radical prostatectomy have a low risk of severe late toxicity, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in Radiotherapy & Oncology.

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Emergence of Nootropic Drugs Raises Familiar Ethical Issues

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The emerging use of cognitive-enhancing nootropic drugs, the so-called "smart drugs," in competitive academia raises ethical issues that parallel the doping controversy played out over the past 50 years in competitive sports, according to a paper in the October issue of the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Surgical Masks Found to Be Non-Inferior to Respirators

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical masks may be no less effective than N95 respirators in preventing influenza in health care workers, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Survey on Medical Practice Performance Deemed Reliable

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- A nationwide survey of patients in England, which was used to partially calculate payments to general practitioners, unde-rrepresented some socioeconomic groups, but did not produce biased results leading to inequitable payments to physician practices, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in BMJ.

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Intrauterine Device Linked to Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of adverse obstetric outcomes is elevated in women who conceive while using an intrauterine device (IUD), especially in women who retain the device throughout pregnancy, according to a study in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Retinal Detachment More Common Among Affluent

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Retinal detachment is a condition that afflicts the affluent more than lower socioeconomic groups, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

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Key Elements of Workplace Wellness Programs Outlined

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Successful workplace wellness programs combine a range of interventions that promote change at both the individual and organizational level, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in Circulation.

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Sleep Deprivation May Be Associated With Alzheimer's

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep deprivation may play a role in the development of Alzheimer's disease, according to research published online Sept. 24 in Science.

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CDC Says States Not Meeting Fruit and Veggie Objectives

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In a Sept. 29 press release, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says no U.S. state is currently meeting the national Healthy People 2010 objectives for fruit and vegetable consumption.

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Risk of Foot Pain Associated With Footwear Type

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Women who wear shoes that are of suboptimal design for feet are significantly more likely to report hindfoot pain than those who wear good shoes, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Prenatal Pandemic Flu May Increase Cardiovascular Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal exposure to the notoriously virulent 1918 pandemic flu increased the risk of cardiovascular disease and growth retardation later in life, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease.

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Physicians May Fail to Act on Electronic Alerts Quickly

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians using a system with electronic medical records and computerized alerts may not acknowledge or act upon critical imaging results in a timely manner, according to research published in the Sept. 28 Archives of Internal Medicine.

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