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September 2009 Briefing - Internal Medicine

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Internal Medicine for September 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Post-Surgery Complications, Mortality in Hospitals Analyzed

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- While post-surgery complication rates were similar across hospitals, the death rate for hospitals in the quintile with the highest complication-related mortality were nearly twice that of the lowest quintile, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Data Model May Predict Risk of Future Domestic Abuse

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Readily available patient medical data can be used in a Bayesian model to estimate the future risk of a diagnosis involving domestic abuse, according to a study published Sept. 29 in BMJ.

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Midlife Overweight in Women Leads to Later Poorer Health

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- A woman who is overweight at midlife has significantly reduced odds of healthy survival past the age of 70, according to a study published Sept. 29 in BMJ.

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Combination Treatment Found Effective for Neuropathic Pain

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- A combination treatment of gabapentin and nortriptyline relieve chronic neuropathic pain better than either medication given as monotherapy, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in The Lancet.

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Efficacy of Treatments for Overactive Bladder Examined

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Sacral nerve stimulation and botulinum toxin are effective treatments for overactive bladder, according to two studies in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

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More Research Finds Limited Benefit From PSA Test

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Men should be aware of their chances of benefits and harms from prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing before the test, but many are not discussing screening before making the decision, according to the results of two studies in the Sept. 28 Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Bacterial Infections Are a Factor in Many H1N1 Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients who have died of H1N1 influenza this year had a bacterial co-infection that likely contributed to their deaths, according to a Sept. 29 early release of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Role of Estrogen Supported in Colorectal Cancer Survival

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The finding that younger women with metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC) survive longer than younger men -- which is not seen in older patients -- supports the idea that estrogen may play a role in improved outcomes in the disease, according to research published online Sept. 29 in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Review Questions Statins in Acute Coronary Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Currently, evidence doesn't appear to support the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association's Class I, Level of Evidence: A recommendation for initiating statin therapy in patients before discharge following an acute coronary syndrome episode, according to a commentary in the Oct. 6 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Bladder Cancer Surgery Delay Linked to Poorer Survival

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with bladder cancer, less delay between transurethral tumor resection and cystectomy may improve the chances of survival, particularly in those with lower stage disease, according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Imaging Modality Shows Great Promise in Heart Failure

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is the new "gold standard imaging technique" for the assessment of heart anatomy, function and viability in heart failure patients, according to a report in the Oct. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Stroke Strikes Without Warning in Majority of Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acute stroke, only one in eight have a warning from a prior transient ischemic attack, according to a study published in the September issue of Neurology.

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Leptin-Impaired Obese Mice Not Found to Develop Arthritis

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In leptin-impaired mice, the resulting extreme obesity does not cause knee osteoarthritis, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Imaging for Heart Disease Severity Impacts Treatment

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery disease (CAD) patients who underwent coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) to stratify disease severity subsequently had treatment and risk factor control stepped up, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Exertional Illnesses Linked to Anesthesia Complication

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Possible links exist between heat- and exercise-related illnesses that strike even the physically fit and a feared complication of anesthesia, according to a review in the October issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Baseline Factors May Predict Mortality Risk in Myelofibrosis

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Three baseline factors in the bone marrow disease myelofibrosis can be used to identify patients at the highest risk of death, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Spinal Opioid Infusion Deemed Probable Cause of Deaths

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- An investigation into a cluster of deaths in patients being treated for non-cancer pain with intrathecal opioid pumps found that the pain relief therapy was the probable cause of death, according to a report in the October issue of Anesthesiology.

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People Want to Know About Costly Cancer Drug Options

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- If they had cancer, most Australians would want to know about an expensive anticancer drug (EACD), and many would be prepared to pay for it even if they could not afford to, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Autoantibody May Increase Risk of Stroke, Heart Attack

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a particular autoimmune antibody have a much higher risk of having a stroke or heart attack, with an even higher risk if they take oral contraceptives or smoke, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Ultrasound Found Inadequate for Lymph Node Biopsy

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasound scanners currently do not have sufficient resolution to biopsy sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) for evidence of cancer metastasis and cannot replace conventional SLN biopsy, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Several Factors Affect Risk of Crashes in Teenage Drivers

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Parenting styles and primary access to vehicles significantly affects crash risks in teen drivers, according to two studies published in the October issue of Pediatrics.

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Imaging Modalities for Heart Disease in Diabetics Compared

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) was superior to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) at detecting coronary artery disease among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Biopsy Protocols Compared for Prostate Cancer Detection

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Twelve-core and eight-core biopsies have similar prostate cancer detection rates for initial biopsy, but the additional transition cores provided in 12-core biopsy may be helpful in detecting missed cancers in repeat biopsies, according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Medication Usage Differs Among Hispanic Children

TUESDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In Hispanic children, acculturation differences affect medication usage, according to a study in the October issue of Pediatrics.

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Cirrhosis Complication Linked to Increased Crash Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with cirrhosis, those with minimal hepatic encephalopathy diagnosed by the inhibitory control test have significantly higher motor vehicle crash rates than those without the condition, according to a study in the October issue of Hepatology.

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Abdominal Obesity May Affect Risks in Heart Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stable coronary heart disease, abdominal obesity independently predicts heart failure hospitalization and recurrent cardiovascular events, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Study Looks at Screening and Bilirubin Encephalopathy

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The effect of screening for hyperbilirubinemia on the incidence of acute and chronic bilirubin encephalopathy remains unknown, according to research published in the October issue of Pediatrics.

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Recurrence of Frank Hematuria Requires Careful Assessment

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who have an initial episode of frank hematuria without a diagnosis, followed by a later recurrence, thorough evaluation is necessary due to a substantial risk of urological cancer, according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Socioeconomics Play Role in Prostate Cancer Mortality Odds

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate cancer patients from low socioeconomic groups are more likely to die than their counterparts of high socioeconomic status, due to delayed diagnosis, poorer diagnostic methods and less invasive treatment, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in Cancer.

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Prophylactic Mastectomy Rare Among High-Risk Women

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- It is relatively uncommon for women at high risk for breast cancer, but without diagnosed disease, to opt for prophylactic mastectomy, but women diagnosed with breast cancer are increasingly likely to undergo contralateral mastectomy, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in Cancer.

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Efficacy of Rapid Influenza Diagnostic Test Explored

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Although the rapid influenza diagnostic test can accurately predict confirmed infection with pandemic H1N1 influenza, the test produces too many false negatives to be of use in the management of the disease pandemic, according to a study in the Sept. 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Test Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A diagnostic test using cells from bronchoalveolar lavage is quick and effective in distinguishing active tuberculosis infection from latent infection in patients with suspected tuberculosis where the bacteria are undetectable in sputum, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Moderate Drinking May Reduce Men's Risk of Heart Disease

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In hypertensive men, moderate drinking may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. However, in men and women at moderate risk of heart disease, pomegranate juice appears to have no effect on the overall progression of carotid intima-media thickness, according to two studies in the Oct. 1 American Journal of Cardiology.

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Low Back Pain in Pregnancy a Major Health Issue in Iran

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Low back pain (LBP) in pregnancy is an extremely common health problem in Iran, affecting more than 84 percent of women at some point in their pregnancies, according to a study in the October issue of The Spine Journal.

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Hydration Procedure Found to Benefit Kidney Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with mild renal insufficiency who undergo elective coronary procedures, standard hydration plus a single-bolus intravenous administration of sodium bicarbonate may effectively reduce the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy compared to standard hydration alone, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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H1N1 Virus's Genetic Makeup Appears to Be Staying Stable

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The genetic makeup of the H1N1 flu has remained stable, which means the yet-to-be-released vaccine is likely to be a good match for the virus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at a Sept. 25 media briefing.

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Better Stove May Improve Women's Respiratory Health

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In rural Mexican women, use of an improved wood-burning stove is associated with better respiratory function compared to a traditional open fire, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome Can Cause Lifelong Ills

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Children with minimal-change nephrotic syndrome are at increased risk for osteoporosis, hypertension, sperm abnormalities and cataracts if the condition persists beyond puberty, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Early Pregnancy Use of SSRIs and Congenital Defects Studied

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The use of certain selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in early pregnancy is associated with a higher prevalence of septal heart defects in offspring, according to research published online Sept. 23 in BMJ.

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Neck Index Found Adequate in Test-Retest Reliability

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with mechanical neck disorders, the Neck Disability Index demonstrates adequate responsiveness, according to a study published in the October issue of The Spine Journal.

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FDA Warns Prescribers About Tamiflu Dosing Errors

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a Public Health Alert to notify pharmacists and prescribers about the potential for dosing errors with oseltamivir (Tamiflu for Oral Suspension).

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Study Casts Further Doubt on PSA for Cancer Screening

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Based on likelihood ratios, prostate specific antigen (PSA) concentrations at any cutoff value didn't meet the criteria needed for a screening test, according to research published online Sept. 24 in BMJ.

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Endocrine Guidelines Developed for Transsexuals

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- A new clinical practice guideline offers advice for the endocrine treatment of transsexuals, according to a special article published in the September Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Live Birth Has Little Effect on Kidney Transplant Recipients

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In women with a functioning kidney transplant, a live birth has no significant effect on either graft or patient survival, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Obesity Can Lead to Resistance to Insulin-Like Hormone

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary obesity leads to whole body and vascular resistance to insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) through its effects on the vasculature and glucose metabolism, according to a study in the October issue of Endocrinology.

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Multiple Strokes Linked to Higher Risk for Post-Stroke Dementia

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of developing dementia after stroke is higher in patients who have had multiple strokes, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Maternal Bariatric Surgery Tied to Less Offspring Obesity

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery in women before pregnancy helps reduce the risk of childhood obesity and improve cardio-metabolic markers in their offspring by improving the intrauterine environment, according to a study in the October issue of Endocrinology.

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Role of Nitric Oxide Studied in Antibiotic Resistance

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Nitric oxide created by bacterial nitric oxide synthases (bNOS) may help protect bacteria from numerous antibiotics, according to research published in the Sept. 11 issue of Science.

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Lower Legal Drinking Age Linked to Later Problems

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who were able to legally purchase alcohol at younger ages may have a higher risk of recent alcohol or drug disorders, even decades later, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

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Folate Linked to Fewer Deaths in Coronary Artery Disease

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The use of folate may reduce the long-term risk of death in patients with coronary artery disease and elevated homocysteine, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Exercise During Pregnancy Cuts Odds of Overweight Baby

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise during pregnancy lowers the odds of giving birth to an excessively heavy baby, but exercise before pregnancy may not make a difference, according to a study published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Procedure Compares Well for Sleep Apnea Treatment

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Multilevel radiofrequency tissue volume reduction may offer similar improvements in sleep apnea-related symptoms compared to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Fat Hormone May Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Diabetics

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A fragment of the fat hormone adiponectin improves glucose and lipid metabolism and restores insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant diabetic mice, according to a study in the October issue of Endocrinology.

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Meta-Analysis Finds Flu Linked to Heart Attack and Death

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For people with heart disease, getting influenza increases the risk of heart attack and death, and cardiac patients should be strongly encouraged to get vaccinated, according to a literature review and meta-analysis reported in the October issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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New Tool May Accurately Predict Cervical Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A new tool for assessing cervical cancer risk may offer clinicians a simpler method for making treatment decisions than commonly used management algorithms, according to an article published online Sept. 20 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Many Factors Figure Into Cardiovascular Risk Estimation

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A number of factors affect the usefulness of risk estimation systems for predicting atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients, including patient age and the applicability of the system to different populations, according to research published in the Sept. 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Risk of Postpartum Bleeding Higher After Cesarean

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of severe postpartum hemorrhage increases after induction and pre-labor cesarean section, according to a study in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Live-Virus Vaccine Shows Promise Against Rabies

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A rabies vaccine made with a live virus lacking a gene needed for replication appears safe and effective with a simpler dosing regimen than the current post-exposure vaccine, according to results of animal studies published online Sept. 18 in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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Study Explores Head, Neck Cancer Radiation Completion

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with head and neck cancer, having surgery or chemotherapy may influence their likelihood of completing radiotherapy, according to research published in the September Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Alcohol Found to Lessen Risk for Enlarged Prostate

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A man's risk of developing benign prostatic hyperplasia (BHP) decreases as his consumption of alcohol increases, but not the risk of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), according to a meta-analysis reported in the October issue of the Journal of Urology.

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Drug May Slow Progression of Parkinson's Disease

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Early treatment with rasagiline may slow the progression of Parkinson's disease in patients with very mild disease, according to a study in the Sept. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Doubling Drug Dose Beneficial in Leukemia Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Doubling the conventional dose of daunorubicin significantly improves complete remission rates and often overall survival in patients with previously untreated acute myeloid leukemia (AML), according to two studies in the Sept. 24 New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Lowenberg
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Gene Mutations Linked to Hereditary Immunodeficiency

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Gene mutations leading to a lack of DOCK8 protein in lymphocytes are associated with a hereditary combined immunodeficiency, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Inactivated Vaccine Worked Best in 2007/2008 Flu Season

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Inactivated influenza vaccines were the most effective during the 2007/2008 flu season, but live attenuated vaccines also provided some protection, according to a study in the Sept. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Widowhood Affects Sexual Infection Risk in Older Men

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Older men may have an increased risk of sexually transmitted infections after losing a spouse, especially if they take medications for erectile dysfunction, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Review Advises Hand Washing, Other Antiviral Measures

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hand washing, wearing a mask, and isolating potential cases are all effective in interrupting the spread of viral respiratory infections and should be given greater attention when planning for widespread outbreaks, according to research published Sept. 22 in BMJ.

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Rosuvastatin Merits Wider Use for Heart Disease Prevention

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prescribing rosuvastatin for patients with low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels has enough benefits in terms of number needed to treat values to merit wide use in primary prevention of cardiovascular events, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Surgeries Offering Relief for Excessive Drooling Analyzed

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients with drooling will report improvement in symptoms following surgical treatment, according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Rhinoplasty Patients Typically Want the 'Ideal Nose'

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Rhinoplasty patients typically want results in line with the ideal parameters established by Powell and Humphreys, a common reference for the procedure, and computer imaging can help define patients' preferences, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Smoking Associated With Lupus Erythematosus

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for lupus erythematosus but alcohol consumption is not, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Intensive Care Patients Can Benefit From Physical Medicine

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Efforts to prevent neuromuscular complications after critical illness can begin in intensive care as soon as a patient is physiologically stabilized, according to a study in the October issue of Critical Care Medicine.

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Simplified System Reduces Overtriage in Trauma Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A simplified triage system based on only four variables considerably reduces the overtriage rate with an acceptable undertriage rate in trauma patients, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Spotlight on Social Networking Use Among Medical Students

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of medical schools report instances of medical students posting unprofessional content on social networking Web sites, including some instances of violations of patient confidentiality, according to a report in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Physician Medical Errors Linked to Fatigue and Burnout

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of medical error is associated with a host of factors related to physician fatigue, burnout, and mental and emotional well-being, according to a study in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Obstetric Training Can Be Ranked by Complication Rates

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Residency programs for obstetricians can be ranked for quality by comparing the maternal complications rates for the cohorts of physicians that graduate from the programs, according to a study in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Mindfulness Training Can Improve Physician Well-Being

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians participating in a program teaching self-awareness and mindful communication were able to reduce stress and burnout while improving their sense of well-being and other traits associated with patient-centered care, according to a study in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Hot Flush Severity Linked to Estrogen Effects on Vasculature

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Oral estrogen treatment of recently postmenopausal women has adverse effects on vasculature in women with relatively mild hot flushes, suggesting that hot flush severity should be taken into account when assessing hormone therapy, according to a study in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Most Pregnant Women Can Safely Fly

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women can safely fly as long as they do not have any obstetric or other medical complications, according to recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Vitamin D Supplementation Helps Avert Melanoma Relapse

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D supplementation may help prevent melanoma relapse and increase the chance that tumors will be thinner if relapse does occur, according to research published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Inflammation Linked to Peripheral Atherosclerosis

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Inflammatory markers are consistently associated with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and particular outcomes, but are not necessarily causally associated; and, although genetics may play an important role, no genetic marker has been associated with the disease, according to a review in the Sept. 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Overweight Can Complicate Aneuploidy Screening

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Although body mass index does not affect the visual quality of nuchal translucency ultrasound tests, women with a higher body mass index take longer to complete the test and more need transvaginal ultrasound compared with normal weight women, according to a study in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Breast Cancer Prevention Drugs and Cognition Studied

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The selective estrogen receptor modulators tamoxifen and raloxifene, used for breast cancer prevention in postmenopausal women, have similar effects on cognition, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Public Smoking Bans Linked to Fewer Heart Attacks

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Bans on smoking in public are associated with a drop in hospitalizations for heart attacks and the benefits increase with time, according to one study in the Sept. 29 Journal of the American College of Cardiology and a second study published online Sept. 21 in Circulation.

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New Measures Could Help in Fight Against Heart Disease

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- New performance measures for cardiovascular care will improve health care providers' efforts to prevent heart disease among their patients, according to a joint statement published in the Sept. 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and online Sept. 21 in Circulation.

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Alcohol Linked to Decreased Mortality After Head Injury

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with traumatic brain injuries who test positive for alcohol are less likely to die but more likely to have complications than patients who test negative, according to a study in the September issue of Archives of Surgery.

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Acid Reflux Surgery Unaffected by Delayed Gastric Emptying

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Delayed gastric emptying (DGE) does not affect control and relief of acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease who undergo Nissen fundoplication, although patients with DGE still have more dyspeptic symptoms, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Impaired Financial Skills Could Help Predict Alzheimer's

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may have faltering financial reasoning in the year before converting to Alzheimer's disease, which could have implications for their families, according to research published in the Sept. 22 issue of Neurology.

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Sclerotic Skin Diseases Often Have Psychosocial Impact

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The chronic sclerotic skin diseases eosinophilic fasciitis and morphea can be accompanied by physical pain, psychological distress, perceived social stigmatization, and other impacts that combine to impair the patient's quality of life, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Tanning May Put Very-Light-Skinned Youth at Higher Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Very-light-skinned children who tan develop more nevi than their counterparts who do not, which may indicate increased risk of developing melanoma when they are older, according to a study published in the September issue of the Archives of Dermatology, while another study in the same issue recommends more states implement controls on youth access to tanning facilities.

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Scoliosis Surgery Linked to Good Long-Term Outcomes

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In the long term, patients who receive surgical treatment for scoliosis are no more likely to develop low back pain or have an impaired quality of life than the general population, according to two studies in the Sept. 15 issue of Spine.

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Pain Linked to Functional Decline in Middle-Aged Adults

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In middle-aged adults, pain is associated with an accelerated decline in physical function, with mobility limitations similar to those decades older without pain, according to a study in the September issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Cognitive Testing Over Phone, in Person Found Similar

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Conducting neuropsychological tests by telephone may provide similar results as tests administered in person for assessing cognition in older woman, according to research published online Aug. 20 in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

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Even Lower Blood Lead in Children Can Impair Function

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Lead levels in the blood of young children are associated with hindered educational attainment at concentrations half that previously considered as a cause for concern, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Frequent Dosing Can Improve Survival in Ovarian Cancer

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- More frequent dosing with paclitaxel combined with carboplatin improves survival in women with advanced ovarian cancer, according to a study published early online Sept. 20 in The Lancet to coincide with the European Cancer Organisation meeting in Berlin.

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Papers Look at Lung Cancer Factors in Never Smokers

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A guide to lung cancer in never smokers offers an overview of the disease, a description of the epidemiology and risk factors for lung cancer in those who have never smoked, and differences in molecular profiles between this group and smokers, as published in three papers in the Sept. 15 Clinical Cancer Research.

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Color-Coded Charts Increase Parental Awareness of BMI

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In pediatric practices, color-coded charting may improve parental understanding of body mass index (BMI), according to a study in the September/October issue of Academic Pediatrics.

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Patients' Mistrust Affects Use of Breast Cancer Treatments

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Women's negative attitudes toward treatment and mistrust of the medical delivery system are associated with underuse of adjuvant treatment for early-stage breast cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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U.K. Minorities More Likely to Fault Health Care Quality

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In the United Kingdom, ethnic minorities give all aspects of health care lower ratings than whites, in part because they may have different expectations, according to a study published Sept. 17 in BMJ.

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Report Finds Adolescent Vaccine Coverage on the Rise

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent vaccine coverage increased in 2008 versus 2007, but further monitoring is needed to track the demographic factors affecting differences in coverage, according to a study in the Sept. 18 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Sleep Aid May Lead to More Acid Reflux Exposure

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The sleep-inducing drug zolpidem may help patients with gastroesophageal reflux sleep through reflux events, increasing their acid exposure, according to research published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Hispanics Show Lower Artery Bypass Rate After PCI

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Despite having a higher cardiovascular risk profile than Caucasians, Hispanics are less likely to have coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in the year after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Mediterranean Diet More Costly to Follow Than Western

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Spanish university graduates who tended to follow a Mediterranean diet spent more money for their food than those following a western diet, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Study Explores Genetic Links to Crohn's Complications

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic polymorphisms may be associated with risk of certain complications in individuals with Crohn's disease, according to research published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Tutorial Improves Doctor Comfort With Down Syndrome

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- An interactive tutorial involving hypothetical patient scenarios improves residents' knowledge and comfort in delivering a diagnosis of Down syndrome, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Most Pediatric Emergency Asthma Cases Not Followed Up

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In reference to children with asthma who are seen at a hospital emergency room, most cases are never followed up and the mother's education level is associated with odds of a child being taken for a check-up, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Heart Risks in Midlife Reduce Men's Life Expectancy

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In middle-aged men with cardiovascular risk factors, long-term life expectancy is significantly shortened even if they subsequently modify those risk factors, according to a study published Sept. 17 in BMJ.

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HPV Vaccination Acceptance Low in U.K. Minorities

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) is lower and there are more cultural barriers to acceptance of HPV vaccination among U.K. ethnic minorities than Caucasian women, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Weight Loss Associated With Benefits in Kidney Disease

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Weight loss in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and glomerular hyperfiltration -- either through surgical or non-surgical approaches -- may be associated with improvements in proteinuria and normalization of glomerular filtration rate, according to research published online Sept. 17 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Search Finds Higher Pediatric Ischemic Stroke Rate

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Using radiology searches results in a substantially higher estimate of the incidence of pediatric ischemic stroke than previous estimates, according to research published online Sept. 17 in Stroke.

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Gastric Bypass Patients Need Modified Nursing Care

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department nurses treating patients who have previously undergone gastric bypass surgery need to adapt their routine methods of care to treat such patients safely, according to an article published in the September issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Drug May Be Effective for Optical Autoimmune Disease

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Mycophenolate mofetil may be a safe and effective treatment for neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorders, according to a study in the September issue of the Archives of Neurology. A related study in the same issue concludes that an immunofluorescence (IF) assay is much more sensitive than an immunoprecipitation (IP) assay in diagnosing the disease.

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HIV Linked With Increased Risk of Premature Delivery

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-positive women receiving antiretroviral treatment are at higher risk of giving birth prematurely and delivering a low-birth-weight infant, according to a study in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Stroke Education Mailing Cut Time-to-Hospital for Women

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A population-based intervention, in the form of a letter emphasizing the need for rapid medical care for stroke, effectively reduced delays in women getting to the hospital, but not men, according to a study in the Sept. 14 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Guideline Adherence Can Improve Pneumonia Outcomes

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Adult and elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) achieve better outcomes when treated with empirical antimicrobial therapy in accordance with the 2007 professional guidelines for CAP, according to a pair of studies in the Sept. 14 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Antibiotics Easy to Find Online Without Prescription

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Easy access to antibiotics without a prescription via the Internet encourages patients to self-medicate and compromises the quality of their care, according to a study in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Information Limited on Testing Technologies in Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Although information about the clinical use of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing strategies in breast cancer patients is limited, evidence suggests that there are significant variations in testing practices and important knowledge gaps, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Cancer.

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Post-Op Esophageal Bleeding Not Linked to Coagulation

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Bleeding from ulceration after elective esophageal varices band ligation (EVL) does not appear to be associated with abnormal blood coagulation, according to a study in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Smoking, Alcohol Linked to Earlier Cancer Diagnosis

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with pancreatic cancer who smoke cigarettes and drink alcohol are diagnosed at a younger age than patients who do not smoke or drink, according to a study in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Taxes on Sugared Sodas Could Cut Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Imposing a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages could reduce consumption and generate income for obesity reduction and healthy eating education interventions, according to an article published online Sept. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Studies Investigate Hemifield Damage, Race in Glaucoma

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with glaucoma may have faster disease progression if they have initial damage to both hemifields, and people of African ancestry with and without glaucoma showed significant ocular differences compared to their counterparts of European descent, according to the results of two studies in the September Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Exercise, Shockwave Therapy Compared for Shoulder Pain

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with subacromial shoulder pain, supervised exercise improves shoulder mobility and lessens pain better than extracorporeal shockwave treatment, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in BMJ.

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Nighttime Reflux Disease, Sleep Difficulties Analyzed

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), nighttime symptoms are highly prevalent and the resulting sleep difficulties are associated with increased doctor visits, decreased productivity, and a lower quality of life, according to a study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Treatments for Acute Respiratory Failure Compared

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- For patients suffering acute respiratory failure, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is superior to conventional ventilation support in terms of survival without disability, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in The Lancet.

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Hispanic/Latino Community Has Unique Cancer Profile

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanics and Latinos have a unique cancer profile that means they are less likely to get the four most common cancers, but are more likely to develop cancers related to infection, according to a report published Sept. 15 by the American Cancer Society.

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Cancer Drug May Increase Risk of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of postmenopausal breast cancer with an aromatase inhibitor increases the risk of developing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), although cases are mild to moderate and do not lead to patients stopping treatment, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Diabetes Drug Combination Can Eliminate Breast Cancers

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancers are virtually eliminated in mice treated with a combination of the diabetes drug metformin and the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin due to their ability to kill cancer stem cells, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Cancer Research.

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Physical Activity Can Improve Mortality Risk in Old Age

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Remaining physically active well into old age substantially improves survival as well as the odds of preserving independence and daily functioning as the years pile up, according to a study in the Sept. 14 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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More Evidence Needed on Charged-Particle Therapy

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Research comparing the safety and effectiveness of charged-particle radiation therapy with other treatments for cancer is scant, pointing to a need for comparative studies, preferably randomized trials, according to research published online Sept. 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Culturally Based Nutrition Education Helps Weight Loss

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Receiving culturally adapted diabetes education was associated with a reduction in weight and body mass index among type 2 diabetics from the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Lymphoma Death Risk Higher in Rural Area, Local Provider

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Lymphoma patients in rural areas who are treated by community-based providers are at greater risk of death than rural patients treated by university-based providers and urban patients treated by either community- or university-based providers, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Earlier Parkinson's Treatment Based on Disability, Education

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with early Parkinson's disease are more likely to need treatment earlier with greater impairment, disability, and education level, according to a study in the September issue of Archives of Neurology.

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Lipid Screening Cost Effective for Hodgkin's Lymphoma

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Lipid screening in survivors of Hodgkin's lymphoma who receive mediastinal irradiation, which increases their risk of coronary heart disease, is most cost effective if done every three years, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Diabetes Treatments May Not Reduce Inflammatory Markers

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, treatment with insulin or metformin does not significantly improve inflammatory biomarker levels compared to placebo, according to a study published in the Sept. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Celiac Disease Linked to Modestly Increased Death Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with confirmed or latent celiac disease -- including those who underwent small-intestinal biopsy in childhood -- there is a modestly increased risk of death, according to a study in the Sept. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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FDA Approves Four Vaccines for H1N1 Influenza

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved four H1N1 influenza vaccines, according to a Sept. 15 news release issued by the agency.

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Conservative Management in Prostate Cancer Feasible

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In older men with localized prostate cancer, conservative management is associated with significantly improved 10-year outcomes compared to earlier eras, according to a study published in the Sept. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Triamcinolone Studied for Vision Loss in Macular Edema

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Intravitreal triamcinolone may improve visual acuity in patients with vision loss associated with macular edema due to perfused central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), but doesn't appear to improve visual acuity better than standard care in patients with macular edema secondary to branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO), according to research published in the September Archives of Ophthalmology.

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More Chest Compressions in CPR May Improve Survival

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The more that emergency personnel perform chest compression during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of a patient in cardiac arrest, the greater the odds of patient survival, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Circulation.

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Prediction Rules for Brain Injury Can Cut Down on Scans

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Children at very low risk for brain injury following head trauma can be identified using a set of prediction rules that obviate the need for a computed tomography (CT) scan, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in The Lancet.

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Health Care Assistants May Be Useful in Depression Care

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The use of case management in primary care settings, provided by health care assistants, may be helpful in improving care for patients with major depression, according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Three Medications Beneficial in Breast Cancer Prevention

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Three medications -- the selective estrogen receptor modulators tamoxifen and raloxifene, and tibolone, a drug not approved in the United States but used in many other countries to treat menopausal symptoms -- may reduce the risk for primary breast cancer. However, the three drugs are variously associated with an increased risk of thromboembolic events, endometrial cancer, or stroke, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Portion of Population at Low Cardio Risk Down Since 1999

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- A modest increase in the portion of the U.S. population at low cardiovascular risk from 1971 to 1994 has reversed since 1999, pointing out the need for greater efforts at lifestyle modification and prevention, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Circulation.

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New Microcephaly Evaluation Guidelines Issued

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Because microcephaly is associated with developmental delays, learning disorders and neurologic conditions, children with microcephaly should be screened for such problems, according to a special article published in the Sept. 15 issue of Neurology.

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Combat Exposures Can Increase Hypertension Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan who experience the stress of combat are at greater risk for developing hypertension than those who deploy but do not experience combat, but at lower hypertension risk than those soldiers who do not deploy at all, according to a study by the U.S. Department of Defense published online Sept. 14 in Hypertension.

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Universal Insurance Could Improve Primary Care Access

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Although universal health insurance is associated with equity in terms of access to primary care regardless of educational level, more highly educated people still have better access to specialist care, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Joint Pain Can Accompany Aromatase Therapy

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal breast cancer patients receiving aromatase inhibitors (AIs) adjunctively can experience joint pain, marked by fluid buildup in joints, localized inflammation of tendon sheaths, and carpal tunnel syndrome, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Diabetes Improvements May Be Worth the Extra Cost

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 2 diabetes, the net economic value of improvements in health status may equal or exceed increased health expenditures, according to a study in the Sept. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Drug Interaction E-Alerts Show Benefit to Patient Safety

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Drug interaction alerts from electronic prescribing likely improve patient safety and reduce costs in outpatient care, despite the fact that over 90 percent of the alerts are overridden by physicians, according to a study in the Sept. 14 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Aerobic Exercise May Improve Arterial Function in Obese Men

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In overweight and obese middle-age men, habitual exercise may significantly increase central arterial distensibility according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Depression May Help Predict Mortality in Cancer Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In cancer patients, depression is associated with a statistically significant but relatively small increased risk of death, but it is not associated with an increased risk of disease progression, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Cancer.

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Chlorinated Pools Linked to Problems in Atopic Teens

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Atopic adolescents who swim in chlorinated swimming pools may face a higher risk of asthma and respiratory allergies, according to research published online Sept. 14 in Pediatrics.

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Dimenhydrinate of Little Help in Pediatric Gastroenteritis

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Administering dimenhydrinate suppositories to children with infectious gastroenteritis can reduce vomiting but does not significantly improve rehydration and overall outcome, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Pediatrics.

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Lovastatin Reduces Coronary Events Based on Cholesterol

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with no cardiovascular risk factors who take lovastatin have a lower risk of developing major coronary events if they have substantial increases in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and substantial decreases in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in the first year of treatment, according to a study in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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HLA Alleles May Help Stratify Celiac Disease Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In patients at risk for celiac disease, it's possible to stratify risk on the basis of HLA-DQ genotype, according to a study published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Pneumothorax From Air Travel Rare Among Lung Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with interstitial lung diseases have only a slight risk of experiencing pneumothorax as the result of traveling by air or land, according to a study in the September issue of Chest.

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Study Explores Framingham Score, CAD Relationship

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- There is a strong correlation between Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and the development of functionally relevant obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Drug Shown to Aid Patients With Resistant Hypertension

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The vasodilator darusentan significantly lowers blood pressure in patients whose hypertension is resistant to current drugs, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in The Lancet.

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Exercise May Decrease Hepatic Lipids Without Weight Loss

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In obese, sedentary adults, regular aerobic exercise significantly reduces hepatic lipids even in the absence of weight loss, according to a study published in the October issue of Hepatology.

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Screening Athletes Could Prevent Sudden Cardiac Death

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes should undergo routine screening for heart abnormalities, as the practice would help prevent sudden death, according to two articles published in the September issue of the British Journal of Sports Medicine, a special issue in partnership with the International Olympic Committee dedicated to elite sports injury prevention.

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Studies Explore Genetic Factors Underlying Depression

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Multiple genetic factors may help predict patient response to antidepressants, and a haplotype in the CRHR1 gene may help protect individuals who were subjected to childhood mistreatment from depression in adulthood, according to the results of two studies published in the September Archives of General Psychiatry.

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More Pregnant Women Need to Get Flu Vaccinations

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of pregnant women in Georgia and Rhode Island vaccinated for influenza has increased in recent years, but the great majority of pregnant women still do not get vaccinated, according to a report in the Sept. 11 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Waist-Hip Ratio Better Predictor of Seniors' Mortality

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In high-functioning older adults, waist-hip ratio is a more accurate predictor of all-cause mortality than either body mass index or waist circumference, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of Epidemiology.

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Regimen Improves Survival in Childhood Leukemia

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A dexamethasone-based chemotherapy regimen improves survival in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) without cranial irradiation or some routinely used chemotherapy drugs, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Safety-Net Patients Unlikely to Undergo Colorectal Screens

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients served by a safety-net health system, colorectal cancer screening rates are significantly lower than the national average, according to a study published in the September issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Quick Stenting Beneficial in Heart Attacks in Remote Areas

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who live in rural areas with long transfer times to angioplasty have significant improvements in the rate of death, reinfarction, and stroke if they receive angioplasty immediately after thrombolysis, according to a study presented at the 2009 European Society of Cardiology Congress and published online Sept. 9 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Perineural Invasion Points to Colorectal Cancer Outcomes

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Perineural invasion (PNI) is often not included in pathology reports for colorectal cancer, but it may serve as a predictor of outcomes in these cases, according to research published online Sept. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Mutated H1N1 Virus Resistant to Antiviral Drug Oseltamivir

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The discovery of H1N1 mutations resistant to the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir in two adolescent girls sharing a cabin at a North Carolina camp prompted a new recommendation from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the proper prophylactic use of antiviral drugs, according to a case report in the Sept. 11 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Current Health Policy May Not Serve Young People Well

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A high proportion of deaths in young people worldwide are due to intentional and unintentional injury, and the current adolescent health policy focus on HIV/AIDS and maternal mortality is not enough to prevent mortality amongst youngsters, according to a study in the Sept. 12 issue of The Lancet.

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Poverty-Mortality Association Unchanged in England

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Despite myriad medical, public health, social, economic and political changes, the association between poverty and mortality in England and Wales is as strong today as it was at the start of the 20th century, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in BMJ.

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S. pneumoniae Leads to Death in Many Under 5

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately 11 percent of all deaths in children aged 1 to 59 months are due to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae, and greater efforts to prevent and treat disease associated with the bacterium could help attain the United Nations Millennium Development Goal 4 of reducing child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015, according to a study published in the Sept. 12 issue of The Lancet.

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One Dose of H1N1 Vaccine May Offer Substantial Protection

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Preliminary research indicates that just a single dose of the 2009 H1N1 vaccine can substantially increase protective antibodies, but vaccinations with seasonal flu vaccine provide minimal cross-reactive antibody response, according to several studies published online Sept. 10 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Mass Vaccination Could Mitigate Swine Flu Epidemic

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A swine flu epidemic could be greatly reduced by vaccinating 70 percent of the population, including children, high-risk groups, and health care and emergency services personnel, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Science.

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Cardiology Work Force Crisis Looms as Cases Set to Rocket

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The cardiology work force will need to double by 2050 if it is to keep pace with the growing number of patients requiring specialist cardiology care, according to an American College of Cardiology (ACC) study published online Sept. 10 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, and presented at an ACC media telebriefing earlier today.

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Satisfaction High Among Hip Replacement Patients

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Four years after total hip arthroplasty, most patients report that their preoperative expectations were either completely or somewhat fulfilled, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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FDA Panel Recommends HPV Vaccine Gardasil for Males

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel is recommending that the vaccine Gardasil be given to boys and young men to help prevent genital warts. The same panel has determined that another human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, Cervarix, seems safe for preventing cervical cancer in females ages 10 to 25 years.

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Prophylaxis Strategies Reduce Nursing Home Flu Outbreaks

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- During annual influenza epidemics, prophylaxis with oseltamivir in nursing homes may significantly reduce the number of infections, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Statins May Offer Improved Outcomes for COPD Patients

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Statins appear to be beneficial in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but more interventional trials are needed to specifically assess the drugs' effect on relevant COPD outcomes, according to a literature review in the Sept. 1 issue of Chest.

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Kenyan Immunization May Reduce Sickle-Cell Death

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Sickle-cell anemia is more than 25 times more common in Kenyan children with bacterial infections, and immunization may prevent death since the bacterial species are the same as those in developed countries, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in The Lancet.

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Gene Variant Linked to Insulin Resistance in Diabetes

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A gene variant associated with type 2 diabetes is unusual among previously linked loci in being associated with insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, rather than impaired pancreatic beta cell function, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Nature Genetics.

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Neonatologists Need to Brush Up on Communication Skills

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Although neonatologists graduate with a high degree of training in the technical skills they need, they typically lack adequate training in how to best communicate with families facing end-of-life decisions, according to a study published in the September issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Lapatinib Minimally Effective Against Liver Cancer

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Lapatinib is not effective in reducing disease progression in patients with advanced liver cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Bullying, Victimization in Kids Linked to Later Problems

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood bullying or victimization may predict later psychiatric issues, suggesting that this issue deserves greater attention from school professionals and the public, according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Acupuncture Helps Pregnant Women With Low Back Pain

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A week of continuous auricular acupuncture can reduce pain and disability in pregnant women with low back and posterior pelvic pain, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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More Illness for Term Babies Exposed to Preeclampsia

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Babies who are exposed to preeclampsia are at increased risk of hospitalization for a range of illnesses, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Weight Has Little Impact on Efficacy of Oral Contraception

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The effectiveness of oral contraception is unaffected by weight or body mass index, and failure rates decline with age and duration of use, according to a study of European users published in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Viruria Could Help Predict Rare Condition in Multiple Sclerosis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Analyzing the urine of multiple sclerosis patients for JC virus could help identify those at risk of developing another rare demyelinating disease after natalizumab (Tysabri) treatment, according to a study in the Sept. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. And two additional reports detail cases of this rare condition, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML).

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Study Finds Insomnia Common in Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Insomnia may be common in cancer patients in the months after surgical treatment, according to research published online Sept. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Compensation Status Doesn't Delay Canadians' Back Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In Canadian patients with sciatica from a herniated lumbar disc, compensation status has no effect on waiting times for elective surgical lumbar discectomy, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of Spine.

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Quality of Life Little Affected by Menopausal Transition

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The menopausal transition has relatively little effect on quality of life after adjusting for menopausal symptoms, medical conditions and stress, according to a study in the September/October issue of Menopause.

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Spinal Nerve Infiltration Has Potential in Low Back Pain

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with low back pain and radicular pain, an L2 spinal nerve infiltration may temporarily reduce symptoms, according to a study in the Sept. 1 issue of Spine.

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Retreatment Benefits Some Hepatitis C Non-Responders

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic hepatitis C infection who fail to respond to standard antiviral therapy, retreatment with either pegylated interferon alfa plus ribavirin or pegylated interferon alfa plus ribavirin in combination with antiviral therapies may lead to a sustained virologic response, according to a study in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Most H1N1 Flu Patients Don't Need Antiviral Medication

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Antiviral medications should be used to treat H1N1 swine flu only in people who are hospitalized from the flu or are at high risk of complications from it, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Higher Bone Lead Levels Linked to Higher Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Lead concentration in the bones accumulated in prior decades of environmental exposure is associated with all-cause and all-cardiovascular mortality, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Circulation.

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Infections Linked to Mental Decline in Alzheimer's Disease

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Acute systemic inflammation linked to episodes of illness or injury may speed the rate of cognitive decline in individuals with Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in the Sept. 8 issue of Neurology.

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Metabolic Syndrome Can Hike Peripheral Artery Disease Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Women with the array of cardiovascular risk factors known as metabolic syndrome (MetS) are at elevated risk for the eventual development of peripheral artery disease (PAD), according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Circulation.

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Gene Linked to Cystic Fibrosis With Liver Disease

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The SERPINA1 Z allele is associated with severe liver disease with portal hypertension in patients with cystic fibrosis (CFLD), according to a study in the Sept. 9 Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Pretreating Kidney Donors Helps Post-Transplant Function

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Administering dopamine to brain-dead kidney donors can significantly improve post-transplant organ function, resulting in the need for less dialysis, according to a study in the Sept. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Dopamine Reward Pathway Linked to ADHD Deficits

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Rewards-motivation deficits reported in people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be associated with a disruption in the mesoaccumbens dopamine reward pathway evidenced by reduced dopamine synaptic markers seen in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the brain, according to a study in the Sept. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Guideline Reduces Antibiotics Usage, Adverse Drug Effects

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In the management of lower respiratory tract infections, procalcitonin-based guidelines may lead to lower rates of antibiotic exposure and associated adverse effects without increasing adverse outcomes, according to a study published in the Sept. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Reducing Americans' Salt Intake Can Save Health Costs

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing a population's sodium consumption can result in health care savings due to lower incidence of hypertension and can also bring quality-of-life improvements, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

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Study Implicates Hippocampal Region in Schizophrenia

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A subfield of the hippocampal formation may be involved in the early stages of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, according to research published in the September issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Study Supports Protocol for Cardiac Computed Tomography

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Adenosine stress computed tomography (CT) may have similar accuracy in discovering stress-induced myocardial perfusion defects as single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), according to research published in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Many Children Receive Little Pain Relief After Surgery

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Although most parents say that their children are in pain after surgery, many give them little or no pain relief, according to a study published online Sept. 7 in Pediatrics. In a related study in the same issue, nearly all families like being present for rounds in the pediatric intensive care unit, but on the first day of their child's admission, they often do not understand the plan and have privacy concerns.

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Safety of Many Drugs During Breast-Feeding Unclear

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Only about two-thirds of psychotropic drugs can even be evaluated for their safety while breast-feeding, and only about a third of these can be judged as safe to use based on current evidence, according to a review published online Sept. 7 in Pediatrics.

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Costs Escalating for Patients With Spine Problems

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Since 1997, national expenditures for spine conditions have dramatically increased, while self-reported mental and physical health and activity limitations in spine patients have significantly worsened, according to a study in the Sept. 1 issue of Spine.

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Smoking Linked to Arrhythmia Recurrence in Women Only

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking may be associated with a greater risk of atrial arrhythmia recurrence in women following cardioversion, and a higher risk of death in men, according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Corneal Transplant Method Appears Safe and Effective

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A form of corneal transplantation to treat eye conditions characterized by corneal endothelial dysfunction is safe and effective, according to a review in the September issue of Ophthalmology.

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Antibiotic Class Linked to Double Vision

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The use of fluoroquinolone antibiotics is associated with double vision, according to a study in the September issue of Ophthalmology.

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Time-of-Day, Staffing Affect Orthopedic Surgery Outcomes

MONDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The time of day orthopedic surgery is performed and the number of residents available to assist in subsequent patient care can both impact medical outcomes, according to studies in the Sept. 1 Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Exercise Helps Keep Weight Regain at Bay

MONDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise helps stop weight regain after weight loss, according to the findings of a study in rats published in the September issue of the American Journal of Physiology -- Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

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Waist-Height Ratio Linked to Cardiovascular Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The waist-to-height ratio may be useful in detecting central obesity and its related cardiovascular risk factors in normal-weight adults, according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Chronic Alcohol Consumption Interferes With Body Clock

MONDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic alcohol consumption interferes with circadian rhythms in hamsters, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Physiology -- Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

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H1N1 Vaccines Appear Safe for Adults, Children

MONDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The new H1N1 swine flu vaccine appears to be as safe as the seasonal flu variety, according to experts from the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; and, intravenous use of the antiviral zanamivir (Relenza) may provide a lifesaving alternative for severe cases of H1N1 pneumonitis, according to a report published online Sept. 4 in The Lancet.

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Job Insecurity Linked to Poor Health and Depression

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- People who are constantly afraid they may lose their jobs report poorer health and more depressive symptoms, according to a study in the September issue of Social Science & Medicine.

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Swine Flu Guidelines for Day Care Centers Announced

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Children enrolled in early education programs should be among the first to get the H1N1 vaccine when it becomes available in mid-October, according to new guidelines issued Sept. 4 for program staffers by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

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Thigh Size Can Have Impact on Risk of Heart Disease

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A thigh circumference below 60 centimeters is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular and coronary heart disease and premature mortality in both men and women, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in BMJ.

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Yoga Effective in Treating Chronic Low Back Pain

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic low back pain derive better results in terms of reduced functional disability, pain and depression when they do a 24-week course of yoga compared with standard medical care, according to a study in the Sept. 1 Spine.

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Appetite Hormone Acts on Brain to Regulate Bone

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The fat hormone leptin regulates bone mass and suppresses appetite by acting through serotonin pathways in the brain, according to a study in the Sept. 4 issue of Cell.

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HIV-Associated Dementia Linked to Disease Subtype

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-associated cognitive impairment may be more common in persons who are infected with the HIV subtype D, according to a study in the Sept. 1 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Joint-Preserving Treatment Can Delay Hip Replacement

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Periacetabular osteotomy, or reorienting a shallow hip socket to better engage the head of the femur, can preserve hip-joint function and avoid a full hip replacement for years, according to a study in the Sept. 1 Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Prostate Cancer Patients Seek Several Information Sources

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Between diagnosis of local stage prostate cancer and treatment, men access an average of five information sources, according to a study published in the September issue of Urology.

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Adults Who Play Video Games May Experience Health Effects

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Playing video games is associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) among men and more depression and poorer self-health perceptions among women in comparison with non-playing peers, according to a study published online Aug. 18 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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AHA Advocates Atherosclerosis Assessment in Children

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In a scientific statement published online Sept. 3 in Hypertension, the American Heart Association has promulgated recommendations for a standardized approach to the noninvasive assessment of children and adolescents for the earliest signs of approaching atherosclerosis.

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Bleeding Rates in Elderly A-Fib Patients on Warfarin Assessed

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- With careful management, elderly patients with atrial fibrillation may be able to use oral anticoagulant treatment while maintaining a reasonably low risk of major bleeding complications, according to research published in the Sept. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Study Supports MRI Use for Renal Lesions in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is acceptable imaging to be performed in women with renal lesions incidentally detected during routine antenatal ultrasonography, according to a study in the September issue of Urology.

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One in Eight Binge Drinkers Drive Soon Afterwards

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- About one in eight binge drinkers drive within two hours of binging, and about half of these drink at a licensed establishment such as a restaurant, bar or club, according to a study published Sept. 1 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Many Orthopedic Trials Do Not Adhere to Principle for Validity

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Many orthopedic randomized clinical trials do not properly follow the intention-to-treat principle, potentially producing bias in trial results and analyses, according to a report in the Sept. 1 Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Diabetes Control Can Increase Men's Testosterone Levels

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In men with type 2 diabetes who have erectile dysfunction, better glycemic control may significantly increase serum testosterone levels, according to a study published in the September issue of Urology.

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Angiography Before Vascular Surgery May Be Beneficial

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Routine coronary angiography may improve long-term outcomes in certain patients undergoing surgery for peripheral arterial disease, according to research published in the Sept. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Findings Support Deferred Prostate Cancer Treatment

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Some men with prostate cancer may safely defer treatment for years without a higher risk of metastasis or cancer mortality than those who receive initial treatment, according to research published online Aug. 31 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Mutant Mice Offer Model for Study of Arthritis Pathogenesis

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Mice with a defective gene that impairs collagen production needed for joint maintenance may provide a model for the investigation of the pathogenesis and treatment of osteoarthritis and degenerative disc disease (DDD), according to a study in the September issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Race Not Shown to Affect Liver Transplant Outcome

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Liver transplant outcomes for patients with hepatitis B are similar regardless of whether the patient is Caucasian, Asian-American or African-American, according to a study in the September issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Breast Cancer Metastasis Gene Linked to Poor Survival

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Expression of a gene involved in glucose metabolism and cell death is higher in breast cancer brain metastases compared with primary tumors, and high expression is associated with poor survival, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Molecular Cancer Research.

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Diagnoses, Health Costs Rise in Partners of Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Health care use increases in partners of cancer patients following the cancer diagnosis, according to research published online Aug. 31 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Endoscopy as Effective as Surgery for Esophageal Cancer

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Early-stage esophageal cancer can be removed through an endoscope rather than removing the whole esophagus, with no apparent effect on survival, according to a study in the September issue of Gastroenterology.

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Gene Involved in Osteoporosis Development Identified

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A gene important in blocking the formation of osteoclasts, which break down bone, promotes osteoporosis in mice if missing, according to a study published online Aug. 30 in Nature Medicine.

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House Screens Key in Preventing Malaria Transmission

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Houses with screening have fewer mosquitoes indoors, which may help prevent malaria-related anemia in children, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in The Lancet.

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Scant Evidence of Combination Lipid Therapy Benefit Found

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- There is scant evidence to support the use of combination lipid-lowering therapies over high-dose statin monotherapy to treat patients at high risk of coronary disease, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Racial Disparities in Pancreatic Cancer Risk Explored

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Known risk factors for pancreatic cancer do not explain why incidence of the disease is substantially higher in African-Americans versus Caucasians, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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New Cancer Drug Targets Hedgehog Signaling Pathway

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- A new drug, GDC-0449, that targets the hedgehog pathway has shown promise in the treatment of basal-cell cancer and medulloblastoma, according to two reports and an editorial published online Sept. 2 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Statin Therapy Before Vascular Surgery Cuts Cardiac Events

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Administering fluvastatin to patients in advance of vascular surgery can reduce the incidence of adverse cardiac events postoperatively, according to a study in the Sept. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Collagenase Injections Can Improve Range of Motion

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Injection of collagenase clostridium histolyticum into the affected hand joints of patients with Dupuytren's disease can reduce joint contracture, improve range of motion, and provide an office-based alternative to risky hand surgery, according to a study in the Sept. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Alcohol Use Associated With More Physical Activity

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- People who drink alcohol -- even heavily -- may be more likely to engage in physical activity, according to research published in the September/October issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

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Body Mass, Weight Gain Linked to Prostate Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Men's body mass, as well as weight gain in adulthood, may affect their risk of prostate cancer, according to research published online Sept. 1 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Carbon Monoxide Exposure Linked to Cardiovascular Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease episodes in urban areas rise with same-day increases in the environmental level of carbon monoxide (CO), according to a study published online Aug. 31 in Circulation.

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Self-Care Help Needed for Heart Failure Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Acknowledging shortcomings of the health care system in promoting self-care for heart failure patients, the American Heart Association (AHA) has offered recommendations for clinicians and family members in a scientific statement published online Aug. 31 in Circulation.

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Blood Test May Help Identify Pancreatic Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- MicroRNA profiling in plasma may allow for the early detection and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Cancer Prevention Research.

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Retail Clinics Cost Effective for Treating Common Illnesses

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with physician offices and urgent care centers, retail clinics provide cost-effective treatment without compromising quality of care for urinary tract infections, pharyngitis and otitis media, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Secondhand Smoke, Pollution Pose Cardiovascular Risks

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- While risks of cardiovascular mortality are greatest for active cigarette smokers, the relative risk for people exposed to secondhand smoke or air pollution is significant, according to a study published online Aug. 31 in Circulation.

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Many Childhood Sexual Behaviors Temporary, Normal

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Sexual behavior by children is often normal and transient in nature, but clinicians need to be able to distinguish between age-appropriate sexual behaviors and those which may indicate problems in the child's environment, according to a clinical report by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Aug. 31 in Pediatrics.

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Top Hospitals Have Slightly Better Heart Failure Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Although hospitals ranked by the U.S. News & World Report as the best providers of heart care and surgery achieve better 30-day mortality rates than their non-ranked counterparts, readmission rates are similar regardless of ranking, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Nadroparin May Prevent Blood Clots During Chemotherapy

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In patients receiving chemotherapy for metastatic or locally advanced solid cancer, nadroparin may reduce the risk of thromboembolic events, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Smoking Linked to Higher Multiple Sclerosis Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers may face a higher risk of developing multiple sclerosis, but the risk increase may not be due to nicotine, according to research published in the Sept. 1 issue of Neurology.

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Academic Medical Centers Active and Diverse in Research

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Research at academic medical centers is active and diverse, with nearly a quarter of life-science researchers receiving no funding, and relationships with industry more commonly seen among translational and clinical researchers than basic science researchers, according to a study in the Sept. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Minimal Pain Reduction After Pelvic Nerve Ablation

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Laparoscopic surgery with pelvic nerve ablation does not reduce pain or improve quality of life in women with chronic pelvic pain, according to a study in the Sept. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Intervention Delay Has Little Effect on Heart Conditions

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acute coronary syndromes, delaying intervention for a day does not affect heart attack rates and other outcomes, according to a study in the Sept. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Rheumatoid Vasculitis Prevalence Down Significantly

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of rheumatoid vasculitis, a rare complication of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has dropped among veterans with RA since the 1980s, possibly as the result of the increased use of biologic agents for RA, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Surgical, Gradual Menopause Effects on Cognition Compared

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Natural menopause and surgical menopause might have different effects on cognitive function, according to the results of animal research published in the September issue of Endocrinology.

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Findings Point to Link Between Cholesterol and Bone Loss

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The RANKL protein may play a role in a relationship between oxidized lipids and immune-mediated bone loss, according to research published online Aug. 22 in Clinical Immunology.

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Epinephrine Dosage for Anesthetic Overdose Studied

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In an experiment on rats whose hearts were stopped by anesthetic overdose, the administration of the hormone epinephrine above a dose threshold was found to counteract lipid-based resuscitation, according to a study in the September issue of Anesthesiology.

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Imaging Strategy Can Help Assess Pancreatic Perfusion

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and pharmacokinetic modeling can be used to assess microcirculation of the pancreas in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a study reported in the September issue of Radiology.

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Prostate-Specific Antigen Test May Increase Overdiagnosis

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Since the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test was introduced, many men have been overdiagnosed with prostate cancer, according to a study published online Aug. 31 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Mediterranean-Style Diet May Beat Low-Fat for Diabetics

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Type 2 diabetics who follow a low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean-style diet have better glycemic control than those on a low-fat diet, according to a study in the Sept. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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More Problems Seen in Women With Endovascular AAA Repair

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Women undergoing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms had a higher risk of mortality and morbidity than men, according to research published in the September issue of the Journal of Vascular Surgery.

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Neurologists Should Report Reactions to Flu Vaccine

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Neurologists should report any possible new cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome after immunization with the 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine to health officials.

www.vaers.hhs.gov
CDC - H1N1 Update
American Academy of Neurology
The Brain Matters - Public Web Site

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