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September 2011 Briefing - Internal Medicine

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Internal Medicine for September 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Topiramate Effective in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Topiramate effectively improves avoidance/numbing symptom clusters and re-experiencing of symptoms in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a study published in the October issue of CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics.

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Aspirin Resistance Is Relatively Common Phenomenon

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Aspirin resistance is common, but poor compliance may contribute to a substantial number of cases of apparent resistance, according to a study published in the October issue of Cardiovascular Therapeutics.

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Activated Protein C Inhibitor Effective in Hemophilia A

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Specific activated protein C (APC) inhibitor PNASN-1 significantly increases thrombin generation in the blood and plasma of individuals with congenital hemophilia A, with and without factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Tamoxifen Use Tied to Diabetes Risk in Breast Cancer Survivors

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Current tamoxifen therapy is associated with a significantly increased incidence of diabetes in older breast cancer survivors, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in Cancer.

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Doctors, Patients Identify Tacit Clues in Their Interactions

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Both doctors and patients identify tacit clues as well as judgments based on these clues during video elicitation interviews of health maintenance examinations, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Parents of Children With Down Syndrome Happy and Proud

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of parents and siblings of individuals with Down syndrome (DS) are happy and proud of their child/sibling; and those with DS are happy with their lives and love their families, according to three studies published in the October issue of the American Journal of Medical Genetics.

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Advanced Directive Discussions Do Not Appear to Affect Survival

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Having advanced directive (AD) discussions or the presence of an AD in the medical records does not appear to result in increased mortality of patients at low or medium risk of death within one year, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Three New Gene Loci ID'd for Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Three new single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified, which are significantly associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) susceptibility, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in PLoS Genetics.

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High Risk of Salvage Transplant Failure Post Liver Resection

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Initial liver resection (LR) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) within Milan criteria (MC) is a valid treatment for patients with good liver function who develop recurrence within MC, but salvage transplantation (ST) has a high rate of failure for those with recurrence beyond MC, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Hepatology.

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Illness Associated With HEV68 Seen in Clusters Globally

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Human enterovirus 68 (HEV68), rarely reported since it was first identified in the early 1960s, has recently been seen in disease clusters around the world, according to research published in the Sept. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Surveillance Info Sheds Light on Utah's Influenza Patterns

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The United States was hard hit by the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus, and Utah experienced a particularly high proportion of severe illness compared with previous influenza seasons, particularly among certain subsets of the population, according to research published in the Sept. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Smoking Rates for Working Adults Down, but Not Enough

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Workplace initiatives to reduce smoking have succeeded to some degree, but certain groups of working adults are still smoking at rates much higher than the Healthy People 2010 target of 12 percent or lower, according to research published in the Sept. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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U.S. Nonelderly Mental Health Disability Up 1997 to 2009

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Self-reported mental health disability in nonelderly U.S. adults has increased slightly from 1997 to 2009, especially among adults who reported disability due to other chronic conditions and a greater level of psychological distress but who had no contact with mental health professionals over the past year, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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SSRI With Antiplatelet Therapy Ups Post-MI Bleeding Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) with antiplatelet agents, including acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), clopidogrel, or both, is associated with an increased risk of bleeding following acute myocardial infarction (MI), according to a study published online Sept. 26 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Three Weekly Hyaluronate Shots Improve Ankle Arthritis

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Three weekly intra-articular injections of hyaluronate are safe and effective for patients with unilateral ankle arthritis, according to a study published in the Sept. 21 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Food Patterns Tied to Systemic and Vascular Inflammation

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Diets rich in high-fiber, low-fat, and low-sugar foods are favorably associated with markers of inflammation, whereas milk fat and sweets and cakes patterns are associated with adverse effects, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Hip Fracture Increases Short-Term Mortality in Older Women

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- There is an increased risk of mortality within the year after hip fracture in women aged 65 to 79 years, and in those older than 80 years who are in exceptionally good health, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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More Frequent Doctor Visits Improve Diabetes Control

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- More frequent encounters between patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and physicians decrease the time needed to control elevated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Rapeseed Oil Rapidly Improves Hyperlipidemia

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For hyperlipidemic individuals, replacing a diet rich in saturated dairy fat (DF) with a rapeseed oil (RO)-based diet for three weeks improves the serum lipoprotein profile, with reductions in triglyceride levels, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Prehypertension Tied to Higher Risk of Incident Stroke

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with prehypertension are at significant risk of incident stroke, with the risk increasing substantially among those with higher prehypertensive values, according to a meta-analysis published online Sept. 28 in Neurology.

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Burdensome Transitions Impact End-of-Life Care Quality

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Burdensome health care transitions in the last months of life are common and are associated with poor quality end-of-life care, according to a study published in the Sept. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Cytisine More Effective Than Placebo for Smoking Cessation

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Cytisine is more effective for smoking cessation than a placebo, with a better 12-month abstinence rate and seven-day point prevalence of abstinence, according to a study published in the Sept. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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DNA Repair Capacity IDs Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Survival

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- DNA repair capacity (DRC) in peripheral lymphocytes is a significant, independent predictor of survival for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with platinum-based chemotherapy, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Increasing Dose of Saw Palmetto No Better Than Placebo in BPH

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Saw palmetto fruit extract (Serenoa repens) at doses up to three times the standard daily dose has no greater effect than placebo on lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) attributable to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), according to a study published the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia IDs Lethal Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) is prognostic of lethal prostate cancer (PCa), according to a study published online Sept. 27 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Alternate Chromosome 17 Genes Detect True HER2 Status

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with breast cancer and polysomy 17, the true gene status of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) can be effectively determined by use of additional chromosome 17 fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) studies for Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA), and tumor protein p53 (TP53) genes, rather than the HER2-to-centromeric probe (CEP17) ratio, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Cognition Similar for Standard, Intensive Glycemic Control

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive glycemic lowering is not better than standard glycemic control for preventing cognitive decline in patients with type 2 diabetes, despite a higher total brain volume, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet Neurology.

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AHA: Tools, Challenges for Assessing Adiposity Identified

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) should be used as primary tools for assessing adiposity, according to an American Heart Association scientific statement published online Sept. 26 in Circulation.

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Calcineurin-Inhibitor-Sparing Regimens Improve Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Use of calciuneurin-inhibitor-sparing regimens immediately after kidney transplantation is associated with improved outcomes, including less delayed graft function, improved graft function, and less new-onset diabetes, according to a meta-analysis published online Sept. 23 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Elderly Recover Adequately After Cervical Laminoplasty

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) can benefit from laminoplasty and have adequate recoveries in terms of achieved Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores for cervical myelopathy, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Spine.

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Operator Experience Tied to Carotid Stenting Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Carotid stenting in older patients performed by operators with low annual volume or less experience is associated with higher 30-day mortality risk, according to a study published in the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Advanced Adenomas, CRCs More Prevalent in Men

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals older than 50 years, men have a significantly increased prevalence of adenomas, advanced adenomas (AAs), and carcinomas compared to women, according to a study published in the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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U.S. Docs Feel They Give More Patient Care Than Required

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Many primary care physicians in the United States believe that their patients are receiving too much medical care, and that the pressure to do more than is necessary could be reduced by malpractice reform, adjusting financial incentives, and spending more time with patients, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Benefits, Harms With Off-Label Atypical Antipsychotic Use

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- There are varying benefits and adverse effects from using atypical antipsychotic medications for conditions which do not have labeling and marketing approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (off-label), according to a meta-analysis published in the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Lower Cancer Fatalism Tied to Increased Cancer Screening

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Better self-rated health and lower cancer fatalism are associated with greater participation in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in England, and mediate the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) on fecal occult blood test (FOBt) uptake, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Caffeinated Coffee Reduces Women's Depression Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of depression in U.S. women decreases in a dose-dependent manner with increasing consumption of caffeinated coffee, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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SF3B1 Mutations Linked to Myelodysplasia

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Recurrent mutations in RNA splicing factor 3B, subunit 1 (SF3B1) are associated with myelodysplastic syndromes, and are more frequent in patients whose disease is characterized by the presence of ring sideroblasts, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with its presentation at the 2011 European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress, held Sept. 23 to 27 in Stockholm, Sweden.

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Colorectal Cancer Subsite Risk Tied to Fruit/Vegetable Intake

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) associated with different fruit and vegetable (F/V) consumption varies depending on the tumor location within the large bowel, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Cell of Origin Key in Relapsed B-Cell Lymphoma Prognosis

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with relapsed/refractory germinal center B (GCB)-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) have improved outcomes when treated with rituximab, dexamethasone, high-dose cytarabine, and cisplatin (R-DHAP), according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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ESR1 Expression Predicts Tamoxifen Benefit in Breast CA

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Expression of ESR1 predicts tamoxifen benefit in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer, with low levels of expression indicative of tamoxifen resistance, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Abnormal Heart Rate Recovery Tied to Higher Mortality

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Abnormal heart rate recovery (HRR) after undergoing a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) exercise program is associated with higher all-cause mortality, but patients who had abnormal HRR at baseline and normalized HRR after completing the program have similar mortality to patients with a normal baseline HRR, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Circulation.

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Vitamin B12 Markers Tied to Cognition, Brain Volume

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Serum vitamin B12 markers are associated with total brain volume and global cognitive function, with homocysteine affecting global cognitive performance and methylmalonate affecting total brain volume, according to a study published in the Sept. 27 issue of Neurology.

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Reasons for Referral to Specific Docs Differ Among Physicians

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians (PCPs) and medical and surgical specialists differ in their reasons for selecting specific colleagues for referrals, with PCPs more concerned about physician communication and medical record sharing than specialists, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Cardiovascular Death Risk Increased for Childless Men

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Married childless men have an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease developing after age 50 compared with men who have two or more offspring, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Human Reproduction.

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Updated Guides Compare Treatments for GERD

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Updated, evidence-based, reader-friendly reports comparing treatments for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have been released by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to help guide patient and physician decision-making in treating this condition that affects up to 4 percent of Americans.

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Point-of-Care CD4 Counting Cuts Loss of Follow-Up in HIV

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Rapid immunological staging by point-of-care counting of CD4 cells in patients with HIV reduces loss to follow-up before initiating antiretroviral therapy, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in The Lancet.

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Rate of Change of FEV1 Highly Variable in COPD Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of change of forced expiratory volume in 1-second (FEV1) is highly variable among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with late-breaking presentations at the European Respiratory Society Congress, held from Sept 24 to 28 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

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Adjuvant Zoledronic Acid Not Beneficial in Breast Cancer

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with early-stage breast cancer, the addition of zoledronic acid to standard adjuvant therapy does not offer any benefit for disease-free or overall survival, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the 2011 European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress, held from Sept. 23 to 27 in Stockholm, Sweden.

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GLCCI1 SNP Lowers Response to Inhaled Steroids in Asthma

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Expression of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at rs37973 correlates with decreased glucocorticoid-induced transcript 1 gene (GLCCI1) expression, which is associated with a reduced response to inhaled glucocorticoids in patients with asthma, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with late-breaking presentations at the European Respiratory Society Congress, held from Sept. 24 to 28 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

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Generic Tacrolimus Safe for Liver, Kidney Recipients

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have undergone liver or kidney transplants may safely switch from brand-name to generic tacrolimus with no change in the indices of liver or kidney function or rejection, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Distinct Prognosis for Gleason Scores 4 + 3 and 3 + 4

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A Gleason score of 4 + 3 = 7 is correlated with pathological stage and increased risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP), according to a study published in the October issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Diabetes-Free Life Expectancy at 18 Years Down Since 1980s

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The diabetes-free life expectancy at 18 years of age in the United States decreased in both men and women between the 1980s and 2000s, with obese individuals experiencing the greatest losses, according to a study published in the October issue of Diabetes Care.

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Soliris Approval Expanded to Include Rare Blood Disorder

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Soliris (eculizumab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as the first drug to treat atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a rare blood disease that may trigger kidney failure, stroke or death.

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Hospitalization, Complication Risk Up After Prostate Biopsy

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Men who undergo prostate biopsy have nearly double the risk of hospitalization within 30 days versus those who do not, and the rate of infectious complications after prostate biopsy has increased in recent years, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in The Journal of Urology.

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Multilevel Hemilaminectomy Economical for Lumbar Stenosis

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Multilevel hemilaminectomy is a cost-effective treatment for lumbar stenosis-associated radiculopathy, and it improves pain, disability, and quality of life among patients, according to a study published in the August issue of The Spine Journal.

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Many Cushing Syndrome-EAS Tumors Found in Chest Cavity

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with Cushing syndrome (CS) secondary to ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion (EAS) who attend a comprehensive cancer center, nearly 50 percent have tumors in the chest cavity, notably bronchial carcinoid and small-cell lung cancer, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Cardiac Rehab Effective for Secondary Prevention After TIA

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR) is effective for patients who have sustained a transient ischemic attack or mild, non-disabling stroke (TIA/MNDS) resulting in significant, favorable outcomes in vascular risk factors including aerobic capacity, total cholesterol, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein percentage, triglycerides, waist circumference, body mass index, and body weight, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in Stroke.

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Back Pain Outcomes Similar for Surgery, Cognitive Intervention

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and disc degeneration who undergo either surgery or cognitive intervention and exercise have similar results for trunk muscle strength, cross-sectional area, and density at a seven- to 11-year follow-up, according to a study published in the August issue of The Spine Journal.

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Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Therapy Ups Pancreatitis Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The use of exenatide and sitagliptin for type 2 diabetes is associated with a higher odds ratio of pancreatitis and increased reports of pancreatic cancer, according to a study published in the July issue of Gastroenterology.

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Stereotactic Radiosurgery Reasonable for Brain Mets

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Salvage stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a reasonable treatment for breast cancer brain metastases, with a median overall survival (OS) of more than nine months, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Cancer.

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Bed Bug Treatment Can Cause Illness

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Illnesses related to the pesticides used to treat bed bug infestations -- an increasingly prevalent problem in the United States and worldwide -- are few and far between; still, inappropriate use of the insecticides can and does cause harm, according to research published in the Sept. 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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FDA Expands Age Indication for Boostrix

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expanded the age indications for Boostrix, the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap), to include people 65 and older, according to an article published in the Sept. 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Racial Discrimination Tied to RBC Oxidative Stress Levels

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Self-reported racial discrimination is significantly associated with red blood cell (RBC) oxidative stress, with the association remaining statistically significant for African-Americans but not whites, after stratifying by race, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

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SNP in SUV39H2 Tied to Complications in Diabetes

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The minor T-allele of exonic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs17353856 in SUV39H2 is associated with retinopathy in patients with type 1 diabetes, and shows a trend toward an association with diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Diabetes.

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Stroke Outcomes Similar With CT-Perfusion, Time Criteria

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with ischemic stroke, use of computed tomography perfusion (CTP)-based criteria for selecting patients for endovascular treatment has similar rates of functional outcome and intracranial hemorrhage compared to time-guided selection, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Journal of Neurointerventional Surgery.

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Study Compares Great Saphenous Vein Insufficiency Therapies

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Endovenous laser treatment (EVLT) and high ligation and stripping (HLS) are equally safe and effective in treating great saphenous vein (GSV) insufficiency, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Archives of Dermatology.

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Teen Exposure to Smoking in Films Ups Smoking Behaviors

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents with higher exposure to smoking depictions in films are more likely to initiate smoking and be current smokers, even after adjusting for social, family, and behavioral confounders, according to a study and meta-analysis published online Sept. 19 in Thorax.

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GGGGCC Repeat in C9ORF72 ID'd As Genetic Cause of ALS

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the non-coding region of C9ORF72 gene on chromosome 9p21 is the most common genetic abnormality in familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in a large FTD/ALS kindred; and, it is the underlying cause of a considerable proportion of familial and sporadic ALS in a Finnish population, according to two studies published online Sept. 21 in Neuron.

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Schizophrenia, Epilepsy Share Bidirectional Relationship

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Schizophrenia and epilepsy share a bidirectional relationship, with patients with epilepsy more likely to develop schizophrenia, and those with schizophrenia more likely to develop epilepsy, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Epilepsia.

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Circulating Glucose Levels Impact Responses to Food Cues

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Mild hypoglycemia activates limbic-striatal brain regions in response to food cues resulting in a increased desire for high-calorie food, whereas higher circulating glucose levels predict increased medial prefrontal cortex activation, a response which is absent in obese individuals, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Aortic Arch Plaques More Prevalent in Aortic Stenosis

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) have a greater prevalence of aortic arch plaques and complex arch plaques, with the presence of complex plaques independently associated with the risk of cerebral infarction, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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BMI, Tibiofemoral Alignment Affect Knee Implant Survival

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Proper tibial, femoral, and overall anatomic alignment is important for implant survival after total knee replacement, and a higher body mass index (BMI) increases implant failure rates, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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PKCε Regulates Nicotinic Behavior Response in Mice

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Mice lacking protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) show lower nicotine consumption and decreased conditioned place preference for nicotine, according to an experimental study published in the Sept. 20 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Group Living Homes Provide Good Care for Patients With Dementia

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Group living homes for older people with dementia provide good care, and stimulate the values of attentiveness and responsiveness, but residents, family, and nursing staff may disagree on the phases of taking responsibility for care, and performing care-giving activities, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Risk Up for Patients During Long Interdialytic Interval

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For patients receiving hemodialysis, mortality and adverse cardiovascular-related events occur mainly on the day after the long interdialytic interval, rather than on other days, according to a study published in the Sept. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Safe, Effective in Pulmonary Fibrosis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, treatment with 150 mg of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor BIBF 1120 twice daily is safe, reduces lung function decline with fewer acute exacerbations, and preserves quality of life, according to a study published in the Sept. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Exposure to Air Pollution Found to Up Transient Risk of MI

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Short-term exposure to particles with a diameter <10 µm (PM10) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the air is associated with a short-term increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) one to six hours later, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in BMJ.

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Depression Significantly Ups Stroke Morbidity, Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is linked to a significantly increased risk of stroke morbidity and mortality, according to a review published in the Sept. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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F1+2, VEGF, D-Dimer Levels Up in Nonallergic Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with nonallergic asthma exhibit autoreactivity as well as increased levels of coagulation and angiogenesis markers, according to a study published in the October issue of Allergy.

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2006/2007 U.S. Flu Vaccination Policy Lowers Morbidity

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The 2006/2007 influenza vaccination policy change in the United States to include healthy children aged 24 to 59 months has reduced influenza morbidity in the United States, as evident by reduction in the emergency department visits in the United States versus Canada, according to a study published in the Sept. 20 issue of the CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Mortality Up in Hospitals With More Minority Trauma Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The odds of in-hospital mortality for trauma patients are associated with the proportion of minority patients in the hospital, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Model Predicts Erectile Function After Prostate Cancer Therapy

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Erectile function two years after prostate cancer treatment can be predicted based on patient and treatment characteristics, according to a study published in the Sept. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Platelet Reactivity Status Predicts Ischemic Event Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- High residual platelet reactivity (HRPR) after clopidogrel loading is significantly associated with an increased risk of short- and long-term ischemic events in patients receiving platelet reactivity-guided antithrombotic medication after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to a study published in the Sept. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Chronic Total Occlusion PCI Improves Outcomes in Diabetes

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of chronic total occlusions (CTOs) is associated with reduced mortality and reduced need for coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Mycophenolate Mofetil Safe, Effective for Refractory Lupus

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Use of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in conjunction with standard therapy is well tolerated and effective for the treatment of antimalarial-resistant cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE), according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Tasquinimod Ups Castration-Resistant Prostate CA Survival

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- In men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), treatment with tasquinimod (TASQ) significantly delays disease progression and improves progression-free survival (PFS) with an acceptable adverse event (AE) profile, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Lower Sudden Death Risk With Add-On Antiepileptic Therapy

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with refractory epilepsy who are treated with adjunctive antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) at efficacious doses may have lower incidence of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) compared with those receiving a placebo, according to a meta-analysis published online Sept. 20 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Treatment Delays Identified in Regional STEMI Systems

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment delays occur in standardized regional systems for transfer of patients with ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) to receive primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), with delays most frequently occurring at the referral hospital, PCI center, and during the transport process, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Circulation.

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Payer Status Affects Health Care Quality and Outcomes

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with heart failure who have no insurance, or have Medicaid or Medicare, have lower quality of care and worse outcomes than those with private/health maintenance organization (HMO) insurance, according to a study published in the Sept. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Bisphenol A Exposure Not Linked to Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Urinary bisphenol A (BPA) levels are not associated with self-reported type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the Sept. 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Diabetes Ups Risk of All-Cause Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease

TUESDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with diabetes have an increased risk of developing all-cause dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD) than those with normal glucose tolerance, with elevated two-hour postload glucose (PG) but not fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels associated with the increased risk, according to a study published in the Sept. 20 issue of Neurology.

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Prolia Approval Expanded to Fracture Prevention in Cancer

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expanded approval for the Amgen bone-building drug Prolia (denosumab) to include prostate cancer or breast cancer patients who are taking certain hormonal therapies.

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Cold Ischemia Time Tied to Delayed Kidney Graft Function

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing cold ischemia time (CIT) in expanded-criteria donor (ECD) kidney pairs is a risk factor for delayed graft function (DGF), but has no effect on graft survival, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Similar Lipid-Triglyceride Storage in Obese, Lean Women

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Both upper-body obese (UBO) and lean women exhibit similar storage of very low density lipids-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) in visceral, upper-body subcutaneous (UBSQ), and lower-body subcutaneous (LBSQ) fat, with no significant differences in the trafficking pattern into these adipose tissue depots, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Diabetes.

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Work Intensity Similar Across Physician Specialties

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The level of physician work intensity appears to be similar among specialties, with variations in the specific dimensions of stress, physical demands, performance, and temporal demand, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Medical Care.

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Physical Activity Ups Teen Smoking-Cessation Success

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Adding physical activity to a youth smoking-cessation program is likely to enhance smoking cessation rates, particularly among boys, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Enoxaparin Bests Unfractionated Heparin in Occlusive PAD

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Intravenous enoxaparin is safe and more effective than unfractionated heparin (UFH) for treating peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD), according to a study published online Sept. 12 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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MS-Related Disorders ID'd by Proteomic Pattern Analysis

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Proteomic pattern analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI) mass spectrometry distinguishes between similar multiple sclerosis (MS)-related disorders, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Racial Disparities in Radical Prostatectomy Decreasing

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The racial disparity in the utilization rates of minimally invasive radical prostatectomy (MIRP) in the United States is decreasing, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Cancer.

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Posterior Shoulder Dislocation Has Low Prevalence

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Prevalence of posterior dislocation is low, with recurrent instability the most common complication after injury, and functional deficit persisting at two years after injury, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Increased Basal Ganglia Gray Matter in Rheumatoid Arthritis

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have increased gray matter in the basal ganglia, especially in the nucleus accumbens and caudate nucleus, but not changes in the cortical gray matter, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Child Abuse Head Trauma Rates Increase During Recession

MONDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of abusive head trauma (AHT) in children increased significantly in three U.S. geographic regions during the recent economic recession, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Liver X Receptor Agonist Ups Glioblastoma Cell Death

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Liver X receptor (LXR) agonists cause inducible degrader of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)(IDOL)-mediated LDLR degradation and elevated expression of the ABCA1 cholesterol efflux transporter, which promotes cell death in a glioblastoma model, according to an experimental study published online Sept. 15 in Cancer Discovery.

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Fluoroquinolones Up Risk of Post-Biopsy Acute Prostatitis

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who undergo transrectal prostate biopsy, prior use of fluoroquinolones is the most significant risk factor for developing post-procedure acute prostatitis, according to a study published in the September issue of Urology.

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Thrombomodulin Gene Variants Up Post-CABG Mortality Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic variants in the thrombomodulin gene (THBD) are independently associated with an increased risk of long-term all-cause mortality after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, according to a study published in the Sept. 13 issue of Circulation.

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Treatable Disorders Often Misdiagnosed As Creutzfeldt-Jakob

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with potentially treatable disorders may be misdiagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), according to a study published in the September issue of the Annals of Neurology.

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Xanthelasmata Predict Death, Ischemic Vascular Disease

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Xanthelasmata either individually or in combination with arcus corneae, but not arcus corneae alone, predict the risk of ischemic vascular disease and death in the general population, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in BMJ.

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Pre-Liver Transplant Serum Ferritin Level Predicts Mortality

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated serum ferritin (SF) concentration in combination with low transferrin saturation (TFS) prior to liver transplantation (LT) is an independent predictor of mortality following transplantation, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Hepatology.

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Statins After Ischemic Stroke Not Tied to Brain Hemorrhage

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to statins after acute ischemic stroke is not associated with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), according to a study published online Sept. 12 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Subjective Memory Complaints Herald Cognitive Issues in Elderly

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Specific subjective memory complaints (SMCs) are associated with increased odds of cognitive impairment in older adults, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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White Fruits, Vegetables Tied to Lower Incident Stroke Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Higher consumption of white fruits and vegetables is associated with a lower risk of incident stroke, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in Stroke.

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Child Self-Exposure to Meds Explains Most Drug Poisoning

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Child self-exposure to prescription medications was responsible for 95 percent of the cases of pediatric pharmaceutical poisonings between 2001 and 2008, with the greatest resource use and morbidity due to self-ingestion of prescription products, including opioids, sedative-hypnotics, and cardiovascular agents, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Lower Frontal/Saggital Proprioceptive Acuity in OA

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) have reduced proprioceptive acuity in both the sagittal and frontal planes compared with healthy control subjects, according to a study published in the September issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Optimal CRC Screening Varies With Age, Family History

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The optimal colonoscopy screening strategy for individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) varies considerably with the number of affected first-degree relatives and their age at diagnosis, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of Cancer.

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CDC: MRSA USA300 Strain Resistant to Topical Antibiotics

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Most methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates are susceptible to bacitracin, but MRSA USA300 isolates show resistance to bacitracin and neomycin, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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CDC Finds That Lung Cancer Incidence Is Beginning to Fall

THURSDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of lung cancer in the United States is beginning to decrease for women and has decreased substantially for men in the last decade, most rapidly in states with fewer smokers, according to research published in the Sept. 16 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Anti-Nausea Drug May Lead to Dangerous Heart Rhythms

THURSDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Zofran (ondansetron), used to prevent nausea in patients receiving cancer treatment, is undergoing an ongoing safety review and labeling change by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration because it may cause potentially fatal changes in heart rhythm, according to a Sept. 15 FDA safety alert.

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CDC: Recent Influenza Activity Relatively Low

THURSDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza activity was relatively low worldwide over the summer of 2011, but vaccination remains an important criteria for keeping influenza under control and preventing potentially serious, even fatal, complications, according to two articles published in the Sept. 16 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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CDC: Risk Factors ID'd in Most C. difficile Diarrhea Cases

THURSDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of patients with diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) have recognized risk factors or a co-infection with another pathogen, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Global Rates of Breast, Cervical Cancer Up Over Last 20 Years

THURSDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The global incidence of breast and cervical cancer increased from 1980 to 2010, with breast cancer mortality rates increasing and cervical cancer mortality rates decreasing during the same period, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in The Lancet.

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Specific Pain Reduction Seen With Transdermal Buprenorphine

THURSDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Transdermal buprenorphine, but not fentanyl, significantly reduces pain in experimentally induced bone-associated pain and primary hyperalgesia, according to a study published in the October issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology.

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New Tiered Sharing Policy Suggested for Liver Transplants

THURSDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- An algorithm incorporating a national sharing policy with a tiered policy, such as the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD), may reduce the number of wait-list deaths and organ travel distances, according to a study published in the September issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Long-Term Nonaspirin NSAID Use Ups Renal Cell Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Use of nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), but not aspirin and acetaminophen, is associated with an increased risk of renal cell cancer (RCC), with increased duration of use correlated with an elevated risk, according to a study published in the Sept. 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Malaria Vaccine Does Not Protect Against Clinical Malaria

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The malaria vaccine, FMP 2.1/AS02A, based on apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) from the 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum does not provide significant protection against clinical malaria, but may have strain-specific efficacy against parasites with AMA1 corresponding to that of the vaccine strain, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Mortality Gap Widening for Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- By 2006, the standardized mortality ratios for individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder was approximately double the population average, with the mortality gap increasing over time, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in BMJ.

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Mammography Screening Ups Breast Cancer Surgery Rates

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The annual rate of breast surgery increased significantly from 1993-1995 to 2005-2008 for women in Norway aged 50 to 69 years who were invited to undergo mammography screening, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in BMJ.

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Modifiable Lifestyle Factors Tied to Heart Failure Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Modifiable lifestyle factors, including smoking, body mass index (BMI), physical activity, and vegetable consumption, decrease the risk of heart failure in Finnish men and women, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

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IBS, Chronic Fatigue Risk Up Three Years Post Giardiasis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Three years after acute illness with Giardia lamblia, the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and chronic fatigue is significantly higher than in a control population, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Gut.

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Erectile Dysfunction Ups Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Erectile dysfunction (ED) significantly increases the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), coronary heart disease, stroke, and all-cause mortality, according to a meta-analysis published in the Sept. 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Sorafenib Plus DEB-TACE Safe, Tolerated in Unresectable HCC

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), combined treatment with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with doxorubicin-eluting beads (DEB) and sorafenib is well tolerated and safe, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Prehypertension-Hypertension Conversion Rate Tied to Race

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Conversion from prehypertension to hypertension is more accelerated in blacks than in whites, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Hypertension.

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Many Mistakenly Believe FDA OKs Only Safe, Effective Drugs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of the U.S. public mistakenly believes that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves only effective and safe drugs, but providing consumer explanations can lead to better drug choices, according to a study published in the Sept. 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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No Benefit of Long-Term Azithromycin for Rhinosinusitis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with persistent chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), low-dose, long-term treatment with azithromycin (AZM) for 11 weeks offers no significant benefit, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in Allergy.

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Aortic Dissection Incidence Higher in Individuals With BAV

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Aortic dissection incidence is higher in individuals with bicuspid aortic valves (BAVs) than in the general population, according to a study published in the Sept. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Number of Lymph Nodes Tested for Colon CA Up 1988 to 2008

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- For patients treated surgically for colon cancer, the number of lymph nodes evaluated increased from 1988 to 2008; however, there was no significant increase in lymph node positivity during the same period, according to a study published in the Sept. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Computer Nutrition Program Doesn't Affect Blood Lipids

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a computer-tailored nutrition education intervention does not affect blood lipid levels any differently than generic nutrition information, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

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Insulin Therapy May Slow Alzheimer's Progression

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Intranasal administration of insulin may delay or improve cognitive decline, functional ability, and cerebral glucose metabolism in adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) or Alzheimer's disease, according to research published online Sept. 12 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Fatherhood Decreases Waking, Evening Testosterone Levels

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Baseline waking testosterone levels are high in men who are likely to become partnered fathers, and both waking and evening testosterone levels decline significantly after men become fathers, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Venlafaxine, Clonidine Reduce Hot Flashes in Breast Cancer

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Venlafaxine and clonidine effectively manage hot flashes in patients with breast cancer, with hot flash scores reducing more immediately with venlafaxine than clonidine, and reducing more significantly with clonidine during week 12 of treatment than with venlafaxine, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Dalcetrapib Use Safe, Possibly Beneficial in Atherosclerosis

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Dalcetrapib is safe and reduces change in total vessel area and most-diseased-segment target-to-background ratio (TBR) as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT), according to a study published online Sept. 12 in The Lancet.

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Dyslipidemia Ups Neuritic Plaque Risk in Alzheimer's

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- An abnormal lipid profile with high levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC) is significantly associated with neuritic plaque (NP)-type Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in a general Japanese cohort, according to a study published in the Sept. 13 issue of Neurology.

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Current Smoking Tied to Higher Risk of Hodgkin's Lymphoma

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Current cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of developing Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), with an elevated risk for men and older individuals, which increases with intensity and duration of smoking, according to a meta-analysis published online Sept. 12 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Depression Nondisclosure to Primary Care Doctor Common

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Many adults do not disclose depression to their primary care physicians because of their beliefs, with concern about the physician recommending antidepressants being the most frequent reason for nondisclosure, according to a study published in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Metabolic Syndrome Beats Obesity for Heart Failure Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Obese individuals who are metabolically healthy have a lower risk of heart failure than those with metabolic syndrome (MetS) who are normal weight, according to a study published in the Sept. 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Ureteral Access Sheaths Safe in Urothelial Carcinoma

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Ureteral access sheaths (UASs) are safe for use in the diagnosis and treatment of upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC), facilitate acquisition of multiple biopsy specimens adequate for histopathologic evaluation, and minimize the need for repeat diagnostic procedures, according to a study published in the September issue of Urology.

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Hospitalizations for Eating Disorders Up Over Last Decade

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Although hospitalizations with a principal or secondary eating-disorder diagnosis increased by 24 percent from 1999-2000 to 2008-2009, there has been a decrease in hospitalizations with a principal diagnosis of eating disorder from 2007-2008 to 2008-2009, according to a statistical brief based on data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) published online Sept. 8 by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Earlier Cancer Onset in Second Generation BRCA Carriers

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Women who are carriers of BRCA mutations for breast or ovarian cancer are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer at an earlier age than members of the previous generation, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Cancer.

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Clopidogrel Adherence Tied to Daily Pre-PCI Med Adherence

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Low patient adherence to daily medication regimens before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is a good predictor of low clopidogrel adherence after PCI, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Persistent Asthma Diagnosis Tied to Late-Preterm Birth

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Late preterm birth is correlated with an increased diagnosis of persistent asthma, use of inhaled corticosteroids, and more acute respiratory visits, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Pediatrics.

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TNF Inhibitors for RA Do Not Increase Malignancy Risk

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) does not increase risk of malignancy, including lymphoma, but it may increase the risk of non-melanoma skin cancer and melanoma, according to a meta-analysis published online Sept. 1 in the Annals of Rheumatic Diseases.

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Matrix Protein Production in Diabetes Complications Studied

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Glucose-induced extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (FN) upregulation in endothelial cells and in the retina of diabetic rats is mediated through microR-146a (miR-146a), according to an experimental study published online Sept. 1 in Diabetes.

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Long-Term Diet Tied to Gut Microbe Enterotype Clustering

MONDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term diet is strongly associated with specific enterotypes of gut microbiome, in particular protein and animal fat with Bacteroids, and carbohydrates with Prevotella, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Science.

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About One in Four Adults at Risk of Physician-Diagnosed COPD

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Lifetime risk of physician-diagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is 27.6 percent, and is higher among men, rural inhabitants, and those with a lower socioeconomic status, according to a study published Sept. 10 in the special European Respiratory Society issue of The Lancet.

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~13 Percent of Trauma Patients Re-Present Post Discharge

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial percentage of trauma patients, particularly those who are uninsured, publicly insured, or who belong to low-income neighborhoods, re-present to the emergency department within 30 days of discharge from the hospital, but only a small percentage of these need readmission, according to a study published online June 20 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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Arterial Calcification Tied to Vascular Brain Disease

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Arterial calcification in various vessel beds is associated with larger white matter lesion (WML) volume and the presence of cerebral infarcts, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

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Loci in ILR6, Chromosome 11q13.5 Tied to Asthma Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Two genetic loci in the interleukin-6 receptor (ILR6) gene and on chromosome 11q13.5 near the leucine-rich repeat containing 32 gene (LRRC32) are associated with asthma risk; and a validated exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) treatment algorithm reduces asthma exacerbations in pregnant women, according to two studies published Sept. 10 in the special European Respiratory Society issue of The Lancet.

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Survival Up for Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Since 1980s

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with early-onset type 1 diabetes survival has increased over time, but survival for individuals with late-onset type 1 diabetes has decreased since the 1980s, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in BMJ.

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No Sustainable Benefits Seen for Airway Bypass in Emphysema

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Airway bypass offers no sustainable benefits for patients with severe homogeneous emphysema, according to a study published Sept. 10 in the special European Respiratory Society issue of The Lancet.

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Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres ID'd in Most Cancers

FRIDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of the telomerase-independent telomere maintenance mechanism, known as alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), is 3.73 percent across all cancer subtypes, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in The American Journal of Pathology.

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SAMHSA Assesses Recent Trends in Illicit Drug Use

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The use of illicit drugs and alcohol remained similar between 2009 and 2010, but was higher than in 2008, according to the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, published Sept. 8 by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) at the start of the 22nd annual National Recovery Month held in September in United States.

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Cytology Detects Proportion of Cervical Cancer Recurrence

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Liquid-based cytology detects cervical cancer recurrence in about one-third of patients treated for cervical cancer; and, in the absence of any visible lesions, colposcopy is not indicated for follow-up of patients with atypical squamous cells of uncertain significance (ASC-US) or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), unless abnormalities persist, according to a study published in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Commercial Program Offers More Weight Loss Than Standard Care

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Obese or overweight participants in a commercial weight loss program lose twice as much weight over a 12 month period than those in standard treatment, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in The Lancet.

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Cardiac Mortality Rates in Women Progress at Constant Rate

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease mortality rates in women progress at a constant rate as they age, which contradicts the belief that the risk of cardiovascular death for women increases sharply after menopause, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in BMJ.

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Smoking Ups Postmenopausal Sex Hormone Levels

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women who smoke have increased levels of androgens, estrogens, 17-hydroxprogesterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), according to a study published online Aug. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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HPPH-Photodynamic Therapy Safe in Precancerous Barrett's

THURSDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinyl pyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) is safe with promising efficacy in precancerous lesions associated with Barrett's esophagus, according to a study published in the September issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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FDA Announces Label Change to Warnings for TNFα Blockers

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Labels for all tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) blockers have been revised to include the risk of infection from Legionella and Listeria, according to a safety alert issued Sept. 7 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Comparative Efficacy Proposed for European Drug Approval

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- New drugs should be compared with existing treatments instead of placebo before their approval in Europe, according to a report published online Sept. 6 in the BMJ.

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Malaria Predisposes Kenyan Children to Bacteremia

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Malaria strongly predisposes children to the development of bacteremia in Kenya, according to a study published online Sept. 7 in The Lancet.

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Stenting Inferior to Aggressive Medical Management in Stroke

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical management alone is better at preventing recurrent stroke for patients with intracranial arterial stenosis than in combination with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS), according to a study published online Sept. 7 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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BMI of 25 or More Ups Mortality Among Black Women

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- For black women, the risk of death from any cause increases with an increasing body mass index (BMI) of 25.0 kg/m² or higher, and having a large waist circumference is associated with an increased risk of death among non-obese women, according to a study published in the Sept. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Medical Students Show Racial, Cultural Patient Preference

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students may have a preferential bias toward whites and wealthier patients, but this does not appear to influence their clinical decision making or physician-patient interactions, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Odds of Board Certification Vary in New Doctors

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Certification of recent U.S. medical school graduates by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) varies across specialties by educational and demographic factors, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Combined Lifestyle Factors Cut Risk of Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of lifestyle factors is associated with lower risk of new-onset diabetes in older adults, according to a study published in the Sept. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Psychogenic Seizure Diagnosis Often Delayed in U.S. Veterans

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to civilians, U.S. veterans suffer a substantial delay in the diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), which is associated with greater cumulative antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment, according to a study published in the Sept. 6 issue of Neurology.

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Gestational NSAID Intake Tied to Spontaneous Abortion Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to any type or dosage of nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) in early pregnancy increases the risk of spontaneous abortion, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Many Hospital Staff Uniforms Contaminated With Bacteria

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- More than 60 percent of hospital staff uniforms are contaminated with potentially pathogenic bacteria, including drug-resistant species, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Prevalence of U.S. Smokers Down Substantially Since 2005

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Adult cigarette smoking in the United States has decreased since 2005, particularly among heavy smokers; there is still, however, room for improvement, according to a report published in the Sept. 6 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Dissatisfaction, Burnout Common in Medical Residents

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Suboptimal quality of life (QOL), overall burnout, and emotional exhaustion are common among internal medicine residents, and are associated with higher levels of educational debt, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 medical education-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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More Weight Loss for Duodenal Switch Than Gastric Bypass

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Duodenal switch results in greater reduction in body mass index (BMI) and total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol than gastric bypass, but has a higher rate of adverse events than gastric bypass, according to a study published in the Sept. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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More Than 50 Air, Paintball Gun Injuries Present Daily to ER

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In 2008, an average of 56 emergency department visits per day were due to air and paintball gun injuries, with more visits for males, children, and adolescents, according to an August statistical brief based on Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project data published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Immunoadsorption Therapy Effective in E. coli-Induced HUS

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Immunoadsorption of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies can safely be used to treat neurological complications in patients with Escherichia coli (E. coli) O104:H4-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), according to a study published online Sept. 5 in The Lancet.

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Cases of Transfusion-Linked Babesiosis in U.S. Described

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- From 1979 to 2009, 159 Babesia microti (B. microti) transfusion-associated cases of Babesiosis were identified in the United States, and occurrence was not limited by season or region, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Increase in Child/Young Adult Stroke Hospitalization Rate

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The rates of hospitalization due to acute ischemic stroke increased in children and young adults of all age and gender groups from 1995 to 2008, except females aged 5 to 14 years, according to a study published online Sept. 2 in the Annals of Neurology.

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AAP Updates Guidelines for 2011 to 2012 Influenza Control

TUESDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Annual universal influenza immunization, with special outreach efforts made to vaccinate people in certain high-risk groups, is recommended to prevent influenza in children during the 2011 to 2012 season, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online Sept. 2 in Pediatrics.

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Cerebrovascular Pathologies Tied to Mild Parkinsonian Signs

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Cerebrovascular pathologies, such as macroscopic infarcts, microinfarcts, and arteriolosclerosis, are associated with mild parkinsonian signs in old age, particularly parkinsonian gait, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Stroke.

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Researchers Ponder 9/11 Health Impact a Decade Later

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- It may be too early to tell how much of an impact the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster and its immediate aftermath had on those exposed, but cancer, death, mental and physical disorders, and spirometric abnormalities appear higher in people who received greater levels of exposure, according to three studies published in the 9/11-themed Sept. 3 issue of The Lancet.

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MRI Tumor Assessment Predicts Rectal Cancer Survival

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment of tumor regression grade (TRG) and circumferential resection margin (CRM) can be used to predict survival for good and poor responders in rectal cancer, according to a study published online Aug. 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Sexual Satisfaction, Quality of Life Tied to Successful Aging

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Although sexual activity and function decline with age, self-rated successful aging and quality of life are positively correlated with sexual measures in older postmenopausal women, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Simvastatin Neuroprotective for Spinal Cord Ischemia in Rats

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Simvastatin significantly reduces hindlimb motor dysfunction, and reduces white- and gray-matter injury 24 to 48 hours after reperfusion in rats with spinal cord ischemia, according to an experimental study published in the September issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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More Urinary Urgency, Frequency in Women Smokers

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking is associated with increased urinary urgency and frequency, but not with nocturia and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women, according to a study published in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Lower Sleep-Time BP Indicates Reduced Cardiovascular Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The asleep blood pressure mean, determined by ambulatory monitoring, independently predicts cardiovascular risk, with a progressive decrease in asleep blood pressure predicting a significantly reduced cardiovascular risk, according to a study published in the Sept. 6 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Insomnia Tied to Considerable Workplace Costs in the U.S.

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Insomnia is associated with substantial workplace costs in the United States, and is significantly associated with presenteeism, but not absenteeism, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of SLEEP.

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Dexamethasone Dose of >0.1 mg/kg Reduces Post-Op Pain

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Dexamethasone at doses of greater than 0.1 mg/kg decreases postoperative pain and reduces opioid consumption, according to a meta-analysis published in the September issue of Anesthesiology.

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Success With Valproic Acid for Glioblastoma With TMZ Therapy

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with glioblastoma requiring antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) during temozolomide (TMZ)-based chemoradiotherapy have an improved overall survival with valproic acid (VPA) than with an enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drug (EIAED), according to a study published online Aug. 31 in Neurology.

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Traumatic Brain Injury Deaths Tied to Life Support Removal

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with traumatic brain injury, most deaths are associated with withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy, according to a study published online Aug. 29 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Increase in Infection Incidence With Cardiac Device Implants

THURSDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of infection in patients with cardiac implantable electrophysiological devices (CIEDs) remained constant from 1993 to 2004, and increased from 2004 to 2008, according to a study published in the Aug. 30 issue of the Journal of American College of Cardiology.

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