Vyvanse Approved for ADHD

But will get 'black box' warning of possible amphetamine effects

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MONDAY, Feb. 26, 2007 (HealthDay News) -- Shire PLC, a company that makes a top-selling drug to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), has won U.S. approval for a new amphetamine-based drug, which the manufacturer says may be better to control patient misuse.

According to the Associated Press, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Vyvanse, (lisdexamfetamine), which Shire will market to replace its popular widely-used Adderall XR over the next two years. Adderall XR's patent is due to expire in 2009.

The wire service quotes Shire spokesman Matt Cabrey as saying that the company has tested Vyvanse on adults who have a history of stimulant abuse to assess its "likeability." The outcome, according to Shire, was that Vyvanse delays the intensity of amphetamine effects, which include increased alertness, physical activity, and decreased appetite.

Despite the company's efforts, the AP says, Vyvanse will carry a "black box" warning, the same as other ADHD drugs, such as Ritalin and Adderall. The most-often cited concerns are amphetamine abuse and heart attack.

More information

To learn more about ADHD, visit the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health.

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