Health Tip: If Your Child Has a Nightmare

Comfort her and help her feel safe

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(HealthDay News) -- Everyone has bad dreams, but they can be especially frightening for young children.

The Lucile Packard Children's Hospital offers these suggestions for the parents of children who have just had a nightmare:

  • Offer plenty of cuddles, comfort and reassurance to your child.
  • During the day, talk about your child's bad dream, and make sure to avoid frightening TV programs and movies.
  • Leave the door to the child's bedroom open, and offer a favorite toy or blanket for comfort.
  • Avoid spending a lot of time looking for the "monster" that scared your child. Let your child go back to sleep in his or her own bed.
  • Read a book about coping with nighttime fears.
  • Before bed, talk about funny and happy topics.

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