January 2009 Briefing - Nephrology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nephrology for January 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Anticholinergic Agents Linked to Cognitive Impairment

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Cumulative long-term use of anticholinergic medications can lead to cognitive impairment, including poor memory and executive function, according to study findings published in the December issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Biomarker Predicts Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- A marker of acute kidney injury is a strong and independent predictor of disease progression in patients with chronic kidney disease, according to research published online Jan. 28 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Reporting of eGFR More Cost-Effective Than Serum Test

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Automatic reporting of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is more cost-effective than reporting serum creatinine alone in preventing deaths due to chronic kidney disease, but is also associated with a high false-positive rate, according to a report published online Jan. 28 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Bisphenol A Levels Do Not Decrease with Fasting

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphenol A, an industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins and polyvinyl chloride plastic, may accumulate in body tissue or be ingested via substantial non-food sources, according to study findings published online Jan. 28 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Intravenous Iron Replacement Benefits Dialysis Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Ferumoxytol -- a unique intravenous iron product -- may be more effective than oral iron in treating hemodialysis patients, according to a report published online Jan. 28 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Weight Loss Reduces Urinary Incontinence in Obese Women

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In overweight and obese women with urinary incontinence, a six-month weight-loss program significantly reduces the frequency of self-reported incontinence episodes, researchers report in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Long-Term Outcomes Favorable in Kidney Donors

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney donors are likely to enjoy excellent long-term health outcomes, with rates of survival, albuminuria and hypertension similar to those of non-donors, a preserved glomerular filtration rate, and no increased risk of end-stage renal disease, according to study findings published in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Clinical Information Technology Leads to Safer Hospitals

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that make use of clinical information technology to automate notes, records, order entry and clinical decision support have lower mortality rates, fewer complications and also save money, according to a report published in the Jan. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Nomograms May Help Predict Kidney Transplant Outcomes

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A set of nomograms may be helpful in predicting renal function and graft survival in living donor kidney transplantation, according to research published online Jan. 23 in the Journal of Urology.

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Formulas Show Promising GFR Estimation in Children

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- New formulas for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in children with chronic kidney disease can provide results comparable to the best equations for adults, according to research published online Jan. 21 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Impaired Kidney Function Linked to Mortality in Elderly

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Impaired kidney function is associated with a higher risk of death and cardiovascular disease in elderly individuals at risk of vascular disease, while statins reduce the risk of death and heart attack in patients with impaired kidney function, according to the results of a study published online Jan. 20 in PLoS Medicine.

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'Haufen' Might Help Diagnose Viral Kidney Disease

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Three-dimensional aggregates of polyomavirus in urine -- dubbed Haufen -- may be reliable markers of BK polyomavirus nephropathy (BKN), which occurs in up to 9 percent of renal allografts, according to research published online Jan. 21 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Age Affects Women's Access to Donated Kidneys

THURSDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Women's access to renal transplantation is affected by their age and comorbidities, according to a study published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Genetic Abnormalities in Renal Cancer Predict Survival

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of cytogenetic abnormalities in tumors from patients with renal cancer, particularly loss of chromosome 9p, can predict survival, according to a report published online Jan. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Hundreds Acquired Hepatitis B, C in US Health Care Settings

TUESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- More than 400 people were found to have acquired hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) in non-hospital health care settings since 1998 in the United States, with more than 60,000 estimated to have been at risk during these outbreaks, according to research published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Perfused Donor Kidneys Tied to Better Transplant Outcomes

THURSDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Donor kidneys treated by hypothermic machine perfusion rather than static cold storage are less likely to undergo delayed graft function and are more likely to survive a year after transplantation, according to research published in the Jan. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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