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January 2011 Briefing - Nephrology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nephrology for January 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Too Few African-American Nephrology Fellows

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of African-American nephrology fellows is disproportionately less than the percentage of African-American patients with end-stage renal disease, according to a study published online Jan. 27 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Live Donor Kidney Transport Likely Safe

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Live donor kidneys that are transported for transplant function just as well as do kidneys removed and transplanted on site, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Hemodialysis Catheter Locking Solution Improves Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of catheter malfunction and bacteremia is reduced among patients undergoing hemodialysis with catheter locking solutions that include the addition of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) as compared to heparin alone, according to a study in the Jan. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Electronic Health Records May Not Improve Care Quality

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) and clinical decision support (CDS) do not appear to improve the quality of clinical care, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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FDA: CombiSet Hemodialysis Blood Tubing Set Recalled

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Fresenius Medical Care North America have notified health care providers of a class 1 recall of CombiSet True Flow Series hemodialysis blood tubing sets with priming set and transducer protectors for use with a blood volume monitor, as the hemodialysis blood tubing set can develop kinking of the arterial line that may result in serious injury and/or death.

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Breast Calcification May ID Worsening Kidney Disease

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Breast arterial calcification may have a role as a specific marker of medial vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is significantly increased in end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Occlusion Devices Prevent Complications With Lithotripsy

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Two ureteral occlusive devices, the Stone Cone and the entrapment net (N-Trap), have been found to be effective in reducing complications associated with pneumatic lithotripsy. The Stone Cone proved more effective at preventing proximal stone migration, according to a study published in the January issue of Urology.

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Digital Ulcers Linked to More Severe Systemic Sclerosis

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Digital ulcers are associated with more severe systemic sclerosis (SSc) disease, including skin and lung involvement, but not with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) or scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), according to research published in the January issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Survival Same Despite Dialysis Mode After Allograft Loss

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients returning to dialysis after allograft loss (DAGL), no difference was found in survival rates between those treated with peritoneal dialysis and those treated with hemodialysis, according to research published online Jan. 13 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Low Medication Adherence After Myocardial Infarction

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term adherence to medications following myocardial infarction (MI) in elderly patients is poor, and it is significantly worse among those with kidney dysfunction, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Atrial Fibrillation on the Rise in Hemodialysis Patients

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) diagnosed in American patients who receive hemodialysis is rising and is associated with considerably increased mortality, according to research published online Jan. 13 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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CDC Report Highlights Important Health Disparities

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Among Americans, disparities in income, race and ethnicity, gender, and other social attributes have an impact on whether an individual is healthy or ill or will die prematurely, according to a report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, released as a supplement to the Jan. 14 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Renal Function Predicts Heart Failure Outcome

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Patients hospitalized for heart failure who have resulting worsened renal function (WRF) face increased long-term mortality and rehospitalization risks, especially if renal function does not recover by initial discharge, according to a study published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Burnout Levels Particularly High in Residents

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of burnout and risk for burnout are high in physicians, particularly residents, and more than a quarter of anesthesiology chairs meet criteria for high burnout, according to two articles published in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

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Majority of Physicians Desire Collaboration in CKD Treatment

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of kidney specialists and primary care physicians (PCPs) desire collaboration on patient care for those with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but at different points in patient care, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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