Acquire the license to the best health content in the world
Contact Us

May 2009 Briefing - Nephrology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nephrology for May 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Gastric Bypass Surgery Linked to Kidney Stones

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Obese patients who undergo gastric bypass surgery may have a significantly increased risk of kidney stone disease and the need to undergo kidney stone surgery, according to a study published in the June issue of The Journal of Urology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Computerized Prescription Order Errors a Risk for Patients

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Computerized provider order entry systems are prone to input errors that may put patients at risk, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Focus on Meaningful Work Protects Doctors From Burnout

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Academic faculty physicians who focus on what they find most meaningful are less likely to experience burnout, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gene Finding May Influence Kidney Transplant Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney transplant recipients who have T allelic variants in exons 21 or 26 of the ABCB1 gene may have a greater likelihood of several adverse events related to cyclosporine A, according to research published online May 21 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Overnight Hemodialysis Improves Urea Reduction

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to conventional four- to five-hour hemodialysis, long overnight dialysis lasting six to seven hours results in a better urea reduction ratio and less anemia, according to a study published online on May 21 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Democrats Set Ambitious Goal for Health Care Reform

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Congressional Democrats face formidable challenges in their efforts to pass health care reform legislation by July 31, but physicians can take the lead to ensure changes are enacted, according to two perspectives published online May 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text - Iglehart
Full Text - Fisher

ARBs Found Ineffective for Renal Function in Diabetes

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Two angiotensin receptor blockers are ineffective in reducing renal dysfunction in patients at high risk of vascular disease such as diabetics, according to two studies published online May 19 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Mann
Full Text
Abstract - Bilous
Full Text

Sticking to Work Hours Limits Very Costly

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to the 2003 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) limits on work hours, and other measures aimed at reducing fatigue among residents, would be costly with no proven benefits, according to an article published in the May 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Dipyridamole Can Cut Risk of Hemodialysis Stenosis

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of aspirin and dipyridamole can yield a modest reduction in the risk of arterovenous graft stenosis in patients undergoing hemodialysis, and can increase the duration of patency in new grafts, according to a study published in the May 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Common Viral Infection Increases Blood Pressure

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV), found in more than 60 percent of adults, increases blood pressure, possibly through the renin-angiotensin system, according to a study published online May 15 in PLoS Pathogens.

Full Text

Hypoglycemia More Common in Chronic Kidney Disease

THURSDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be at higher risk of hypoglycemia, even in the absence of diabetes, according to research published online May 7 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text

Kidney Disease Preventive Care Linked to Heart Protection

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- People with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who receive preventive care may have a lower risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, according to research published online May 7 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text

No Clear Benefit to Renal Artery Stents

THURSDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with renal artery stenosis do not benefit from renal artery stent placement and are at risk for procedure-related complications, according to a study published online on May 5 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

High Urine Albumin Linked to Venous Thromboembolism

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Already a recognized risk factor for arterial thromboembolism, microalbuminuria also is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE), according to a study published in the May 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medical Center Press Releases Often Lacking Key Details

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Press releases from academic medical centers may often overstate the importance of research findings while failing to acknowledge relevant limitations of the studies, according to research published in the May 5 Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text

Genotype Linked to Cardiac Surgery Outcomes

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who were homozygous for the low activity catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) L allele had a higher risk of vasodilatory shock and acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, according to research published online April 30 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pancreas Graft Function Affects Survival in Diabetics

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 1 diabetes and severe renal dysfunction who receive a simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant have better survival if the pancreas remains functional a year after the transplant, according to a study published online ahead of print April 30 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Chronic Kidney Disease Linked to Higher Risk of Cancer

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate chronic kidney disease may raise older men's risk of cancer by nearly 40 percent, according to research published online April 30 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Chemical Explains Problems After External Circulation

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Cyclohexanone, a compound used to make intravenous bags and extracorporeal circulation equipment, can leach into the contained fluids and cause cardiovascular morbidities similar to those observed after extracorporeal circulation, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

Abstract
Full Text

Erythropoietin May Worsen Mortality in Cancer Patients

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- The use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents to treat anemia in cancer patients worsens mortality, according to two separate reviews of past clinical studies.

Abstract - Bohlius (The Lancet)
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Full Text - Tonelli (CMAJ)

More Americans Reporting Disability

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- The number of Americans reporting disabilities rose by 7.7 percent from 44.1 million in 1999 to 47.5 million in 2005, according to a report in the May 1 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More Information

Physician's Briefing