See What HealthDay Can Do For You
Contact Us

May 2011 Briefing - Nephrology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nephrology for May 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Effect Estimates May Be Inflated in Biomarker Studies

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Biomarker effects are often overestimated in highly cited studies compared to the effects reported in subsequent meta-analyses of the same associations, according to a review published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

APOL1 Donor Gene Linked to Renal Graft Survival

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Significantly shorter renal allograft survival is seen in recipients of kidneys donated by African-American (AA) donors with two apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) risk variants compared to patients receiving a kidney from a donor with zero or one risk variant, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Contact With Drug Industry Linked to Positive Attitudes

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- The extent of contact that medical students have with the pharmaceutical industry is associated with positive attitudes about marketing, according to a review published online May 24 in PLoS Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Many Medical Students Lack Confidence in Medical Law

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of medical students lack confidence in their knowledge and skills across many areas of medical law, according to a study published online May 16 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Limiting Gadolinium Use May Avert Renal Systemic Fibrosis

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Following the adoption of restrictive guidelines for gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) administration, no new nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) cases have been identified in contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) examinations, even in patients with a low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), according to a study published online May 17 in Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Alemtuzumab May Reduce Renal-Transplant Rejection

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- In renal-transplant patients at low risk of rejection, biopsy-confirmed acute rejection is less frequent with alemtuzumab than conventional induction therapy, according to a study published in the May 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Hydroxycarbamide Effective for Infant Sickle-Cell Anemia

FRIDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hydroxycarbamide therapy may be safe and effective for treating infants with sickle-cell anemia, according to a study published in the May 14 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Interest in Nephrology Careers Waning in the United States

FRIDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer and fewer U.S. medical students pursue a career in nephrology each year, despite the growing rates of Americans who have kidney disease or are on dialysis, according to a review published in the May issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medical Education Participants Recognize Funding Bias

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Although most medical professionals believe that commercial funding of continuing medical education (CME) introduces bias, most are not willing to pay higher fees to offset or eliminate such funding sources, according to a study published in the May 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Tied to Mortality in Diabetes

FRIDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Severe vitamin D deficiency may be predictive of increased all-cause mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not associated with microvascular complications in the kidney or eye, according to a study published online April 27 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Health Literacy Limited Among Patients on Hemodialysis

FRIDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial proportion of patients treated with chronic hemodialysis have limited health literacy, especially African-Americans, those with lower educational levels, and veterans, according to a study published online May 5 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Efficacy of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Unclear

TUESDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Though stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is currently used as a treatment for various solid malignant tumors, there is a lack of evidence confirming its effectiveness and safety, according to a review published online May 2 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Mild Histological Injury After Allogenic Renal Transplant

MONDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Histological changes in the first five years after allogenic renal transplantation are generally mild, and are less severe than previously reported, according to a study published in the April issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
Full text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician's Briefing
undefined
undefinedundefined