See What HealthDay Can Do For You
Contact Us

June 2010 Briefing - Neurology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for June 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Best Predictors of Alzheimer's Disease Identified

WEDNESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- In individuals with mild cognitive impairment, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and episodic memory may be the best predictors of conversion to Alzheimer's disease, while cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteins and -- to a lesser extent -- FDG-PET predict longitudinal cognitive decline, according to a study published online June 30 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

MMRV Vaccine Ups Fever and Seizure Risk

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Measles-mumps-rubella-varicella (MMRV) vaccination is associated with an increased risk of fever and seizure in young children, above that already associated with measles-containing vaccines, according to research published online June 29 in Pediatrics, confirming preliminary evidence from a previous study.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

LGI1 Appears to Be Autoantigen Linked to Limbic Encephalitis

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- The target of autoantibodies associated with limbic encephalitis previously thought to be voltage-gated potassium channels is actually leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 protein (LGI1), which serves as a ligand for two epilepsy-related proteins, according to a study published online June 28 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Doctors Agree Malpractice Fears Drive Overuse of Tests

MONDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- A large majority of physicians agree that the practice of defensive medicine -- stemming from malpractice concerns -- is responsible for an overuse of medical tests and procedures, according to a research letter in the June 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Brain Stimulation Linked to Benefits in Alzheimer's

FRIDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) may have a beneficial effect on sentence comprehension in individuals with Alzheimer's disease, according to research published online June 23 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Test Combination Predicts Fall Risk in Parkinson's Disease

WEDNESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of tests on disease-specific and mobility- and balance-related measures can accurately predict which Parkinson's disease patients are more likely to fall, according to a study published online June 23 in Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Brain Hemorrhage Diagnosis Delay Rare in Children

MONDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- In children with uncomplicated minor head injuries, delayed diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage is rare, according to research published online June 21 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hepatic Encephalopathy Linked to Chronic Cognitive Effects

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with cirrhosis, episodes of overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) may be associated with lingering and cumulative problems with learning, working memory, and response inhibition, according to research published in the June issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

10 Risk Factors Associated With Most of Stroke Risk

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Worldwide, 10 risk factors are associated with 90 percent of the risk for stroke, suggesting that interventions targeting these particular factors could greatly reduce the stroke burden, according to a study published online June 18 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Comment (subscription or payment may be required)

Lack of Fitness, Inactivity Linked to Walking Falls

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Poor physical fitness and physical inactivity may increase the risk of falls while walking, particularly in men, according to research published in the July issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gene-Pesticide Interaction Supported in Parkinson's

THURSDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic polymorphisms associated with a decreased ability of the ABCB1 gene to clear xenobiotics from the brain increase the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in the presence of high cumulative organochlorine insecticide exposure, according to research published in the June issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Alzheimer's Risk May Be Decreased by Protective Diet

THURSDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- A dietary pattern (DP) with higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, salad dressing, nuts, fish, and poultry, and lower intakes of items including red meat and high-fat dairy products may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease by almost 40 percent, according to research published in the June issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Scant Evidence Links Any Factor to Alzheimer's Prevention

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- There is scant evidence that any one factor -- such as exercising or following a Mediterranean diet -- is protective of cognitive decline, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), in older adults, according to a review presented at a National Institutes of Health State-of-the-Science Conference and a subsequent conference statement, both published online June 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Plassman
Full Text
NIH State-of-the-Science Statement

Mental Activity May Protect Brain in Multiple Sclerosis

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of intellectual enrichment may negate the negative impact of brain atrophy in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to research published in the June 15 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Presence of Alzheimer's Genes Influences Brain Imaging

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of established Alzheimer's disease (AD) genes, and a pair of promising and novel AD genes, influence the brain characteristics seen in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of patients with the disease, according to a study in the June issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Incidental Findings Frequently Seen in Pediatric Brain Imaging

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 7 percent of children involved in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study had incidental intracranial findings, calling attention to issues related to counseling families when such findings arise in clinical situations, according to research published online June 14 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Prognosis Favorable for Most Children With Epilepsy

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- About seven in 10 children who develop epilepsy experience terminal remission, while the condition becomes intractable in only about one in 10, according to a study published online June 14 in Epilepsia.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Private Insurance Linked to Lower Hospital Mortality

FRIDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with private insurance who are hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke or pneumonia have significantly lower in-hospital mortality than patients who are uninsured or have Medicaid, according to research published online June 10 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Genetic Variations Identified in Autism Spectrum Disorders

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- An international team of researchers has identified genetic variants, both inherited and unique, in the DNA of people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The findings, published online June 9 in Nature, may be helpful in early diagnosis and treatment of autism, according to the researchers.

Abstract
Full Text

S. aureus Infections a Greater Risk After Certain Procedures

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- The frequency and type of invasive Staphylococcus aureus infections following surgeries vary according to the type of procedure, with cardiothoracic and neurosurgical procedures linked to the highest risks, according to research published in the July issue of Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Valproic Acid Use in Pregnancy Tied to Malformation Risk

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- In pregnant women, first-trimester use of valproic acid is associated with significantly increased risks of five congenital malformations in addition to spina bifida, according to research published in the June 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lifestyle, Behaviors Affect Headache Risk in Adolescents

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- High consumption of alcoholic drinks, coffee drinking, smoking, and lack of physical activity are all associated with headaches in adolescents, according to a study published online June 7 in Headache.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pediatric Migraine Treatment Practices Vary Widely in ER

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- In a sample of Canadian emergency departments, children seen for migraine headaches reported frequent occurrence of attacks, and were subject to significant treatment variations by emergency department physicians, according to research published online June 7 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Fatal Medication Errors Rise in July at Teaching Hospitals

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- In July there is a significant increase in fatal medication errors at medical institutions, and this spike is at least partly due to the arrival of new medical residents, according to a study published online May 29 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Revised, Evidence-Based Brain Death Guideline Issued

MONDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- A new guideline for determining brain death has been issued by the American Academy of Neurology, updating the 1995 version and including a checklist to provide doctors with clarity and direction. The guideline has been published in the June 8 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Overlap Exists in TBI, Fractures Attributable to Abuse

MONDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- In children younger than 3, considerable overlap exists in the occurrence of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) and fractures attributable to abuse, though accidental falls occur more commonly than abuse, even among very young children, according to a study published online June 7 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Specific Care Plan Does Not Slow Decline in Alzheimer's

FRIDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- A comprehensive specific care plan carried out with biannual clinic consultations and management of problems with standardized guidelines does not decrease the rate of functional decline in individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, according to research published June 3 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Low-Dose Estrogen Patch Linked to Lower Risk of Stroke

FRIDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women who use low-dose estrogen transdermal patches have a lower risk of stroke compared to users of either high-dose estrogen patches or oral hormone replacement therapy (HRT), according to research published June 3 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

Many Ischemic Stroke Patients Arrive at ER Within Hour

FRIDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial portion of ischemic stroke patients present to emergency departments within an hour of onset, and they are more likely to receive thrombolytic therapy than those who arrive later, but both factors present room for improvement, according to research published online June 3 in Stroke.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Stroke Patients Benefit From Early Lipid-Lowering Therapy

THURSDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Early initiation of lipid-lowering therapy (LLT) during hospitalization for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack correlates with improved clinical outcomes, according to research published in the May 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Motor Change Similar With Two Brain-Stimulation Targets

WEDNESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Pallidal and subthalamic stimulation are associated with similar improvements in motor function over 24 months in patients with Parkinson's disease, and clinicians may reasonably weigh non-motor factors when choosing a surgical target for deep-brain stimulation, according to research published in the June 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Parkinson's Disease Drug Can Cause Corneal Damage

WEDNESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Parkinson's disease patients taking the drug amantadine are at risk for damage to the corneal endothelium and resulting impaired vision, which can become more pronounced the longer the drug is used, according to research published in Ophthalmology.

Abstract
Full Text

Ultrasound Identifies Patients at Higher Stroke Risk

WEDNESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- The detection of asymptomatic embolic signals using transcranial doppler (TCD) may help identify groups of patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis who are at low or high risk of stroke, which could be useful in identifying those most likely to benefit from endarterectomy, according to a study published online May 28 in The Lancet Neurology to coincide with its presentation at the European Stroke Conference, held from May 25 to 28 in Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician's Briefing

HealthDay

HealthDay is the world’s largest syndicator of health news and content, and providers of custom health/medical content.

Consumer Health News

A health news feed, reviewing the latest and most topical health stories.

Professional News

A news feed for Health Care Professionals (HCPs), reviewing latest medical research and approvals.