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April 2008 Briefing - Nursing

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for April 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Behavioral Intervention Improves Obstetric Care

WEDNESDAY, April 30 (HealthDay News) -- A multifaceted behavioral intervention to encourage adherence to obstetrical guidelines resulted in increased use of prophylactic oxytocin during the third stage of labor and decreased rates of episiotomy, according to an article published in the May 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Physicians Lack Feedback on Accuracy of Diagnoses

TUESDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical diagnosis is a largely open-loop system in which there is no systematic way for clinicians to obtain feedback on the outcome of their diagnoses, according to an article published in a supplement to the May issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

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Palliative Care Can Improve Patient Care Most, Poll Finds

MONDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- In an international poll conducted by BMJ to determine which area of health care would enable doctors to make the greatest difference to patients, palliative care for non-malignant disease received the most votes, the BMJ Group announced at the International Forum on Quality and Safety in Health Care in Paris this week.

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Biofuels Partially to Blame in Global Food Crisis

FRIDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- The global food shortage, which threatens millions of people with starvation, is due to a number of factors, including the growing use of biofuels -- potential food crops that are used as fuel for car engines -- and requires that the international community address the root causes of the crisis, according to an editorial published in The Lancet in April.

Editorial

Practice Advisory Addresses Operating Room Fires

THURSDAY, April 24(HealthDay News) -- Appropriate strategies can help prevent or manage operating room fires, which are estimated to occur in the United States 50 to 200 times each year and can result in serious injury or death, according to a practice advisory published in the May issue of Anesthesiology.

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Health Care Workers Affected By Staph Infections

WEDNESDAY, April 16 (HealthDay News) -- While only 5 percent of health care workers become colonized with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection, they are more frequently vectors of the disease, according to a review published in the May issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Heart Bypass Surgery Getting Safer Despite Drop in Cases

MONDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- The number of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgeries being performed is declining, but mortality rates from the procedure continue to improve, particularly in hospitals with lower procedural volume, according to an article published in Archives of Surgery in April.

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Palliative Care and Legal Euthanasia Can Coexist

MONDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Although palliative care and legal euthanasia are usually perceived as antagonistic camps, this need not be the case, and euthanasia can be linked to the development of palliative care, according to an article published in the April 19 issue of BMJ.

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Merits of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening Debated

FRIDAY, April 18 (HealthDay News) -- The recent decision by the United Kingdom's Department of Health to establish programs to screen all men aged 65 for abdominal aortic aneurysm within 10 years is based on data showing that screening reduces mortality, but some feel that screening may cause more harm than good. This controversy is covered in a Head to Head article published in the April 19 issue of BMJ.

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Statins Reduce Blood Pressure in Normotensive Subjects

MONDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Statins modestly reduce blood pressure in men and women with normal blood pressure, according to a report in the April 14 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. A related study in the same issue notes that a diet high in fruits, vegetables, low in dairy products, and low in animal proteins is associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease and stroke in women.

Abstract - Golomb
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Abstract - Fung
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Individualized Health Care Budgets Improve Care

FRIDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- The U.K.'s National Health Service (NHS) should allow patients individual control of their health care budgets, an approach that has been shown in pilot studies to improve outcomes and patient satisfaction in a cost-effective manner, according to an analysis published April 12 in BMJ.

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Child, Maternal Mortality Not Improving in Poorest Nations

FRIDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Despite some positive signs, progress towards meeting Millennium Development Goals for reducing maternal and child mortality in the world's poorest countries is inadequate, according to the Countdown report and other articles in a special edition of The Lancet published April 12.

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Abstract - Countdown to 2015 Core Group
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Abstract - Masanja
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Acculturation Worsens Health Behaviors in U.K. Immigrants

FRIDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Women from ethnic minority groups who immigrate to the United Kingdom are less likely to smoke and drink alcohol during pregnancy and more likely to breast-feed than British white women, but acculturation into British society leads to worsening of these health behaviors, according to an article published online April 10 in BMJ Online First.

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Music May Help Ease the Pain of Surgery

FRIDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Using music therapy in a perioperative setting may distract patients from their pain and reduce their levels of anxiety, according to study findings published in the April issue of the AORN Journal.

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Consider Health Literacy Level When Writing for Patients

THURSDAY, April 10 (HealthDay News) -- Giving patients clearly written educational materials that convey key messages without resorting to jargon is an important part of engaging patient compliance with treatment and can contribute to health literacy, according to an article published in the April issue of Chest.

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The Lancet Launches Two New Global Partnerships

FRIDAY, April 4 (HealthDay News) -- The Lancet has entered into two new partnerships that will address issues of global health and global warming, according to two commentaries published in the April 5 issue of The Lancet.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required) - Horton
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required) - Costello

Childhood Cancer Survivors Need Risk-Based Follow-Up

FRIDAY, April 4 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of childhood cancer often experience late effects of their treatment, but not all patients need to be recalled to a cancer clinic for follow-up, according to an editorial published in the April 5 issue of BMJ.

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Second Rotavirus Vaccine Gets FDA Approval

FRIDAY, April 4 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted approval to Rotarix, manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals of Rixensart, Belgium, making it the second oral vaccine against rotavirus on the market in the United States, along with Merck's RotaTeq.

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No Consensus on Optimum Water Intake

THURSDAY, April 3 (HealthDay News) -- Although increased water intake is associated with a range of health benefits, there is little scientific evidence to support these claims, according to an editorial published online April 2 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Men Less Willing Than Women to Question Doctors

THURSDAY, April 3 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical patients are more likely to ask doctors and nurses factual questions, and if they do ask challenging questions they are more likely to direct them at nurses than doctors, according to an article published in the April issue of Quality & Safety in Health Care.

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Child Well-Being Measures Vary Dramatically by State

THURSDAY, April 3 (HealthDay News) -- Across the United States, the location where a child is born and raised can make a huge difference in the child's health and well-being, according to a report released on April 2 by the non-profit Every Child Matters Education Fund.

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Hands-Only Compressions Beneficial in Sudden Heart Attack

TUESDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Bystanders who witness an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and want to help need only perform continuous compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and do not need to have mouth-to-mouth contact, according to an article published online March 31 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Physician's Briefing