August 2006 Briefing - Nursing

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for August 2006. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Daily Moist Cough Most Useful for Determining Cough Cause

THURSDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Children who have a chronic moist cough provide clinicians with the best clues for diagnosing the cause of the cough, researchers report in the August issue of Thorax.

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Nursing Infants Absorb More Soy Isoflavones Than Moms

TUESDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Isoflavones are more readily bioavailable to infants via tofu or breast milk than to their mothers, researchers report in the August issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Longer Work Hours Can Be a Risk Factor for Hypertension

TUESDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News -- Working for more than 51 hours a week increases the likelihood of self-reported hypertension by almost one-third compared with those who put in 11 to 39 hours per week, according to a study published online Aug. 28 in Hypertension.

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Five Percent of Violent Crimes Caused by Severely Mentally Ill

MONDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with severe mental illnesses may commit as many as one in 20 violent crimes, although the criminals vary by gender and age, according to a report in the August issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Home Health, Hospice Usage Assessed in Older Patients

MONDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Older cancer patients are significantly more likely to use home health services or hospice services than older non-cancer patients, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Optical Radiation Can Stimulate Auditory Nerves

THURSDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The auditory nerve can be stimulated using optical radiation, a discovery that has potential clinical implications for cochlear implants, according to a study published online July 26 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Mortality Linked to BMI in Two National Cohort Studies

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Two trials, one involving more than 500,000 Americans and the other over one million Koreans, suggest that even modest amounts of excess weight in middle age is associated with a higher risk of mortality. Results of both studies are published in the Aug. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Support Surfaces, Supplements May Prevent Bed Sores

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Use of support surfaces, repositioning patients, optimizing nutritional status and moisturizing sacral skin may be appropriate strategies to prevent pressure ulcers, according to the results of a systematic review published in the Aug. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Intense End-of-Life Care Less Common in Rural Residents

TUESDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Rural nursing home residents are less likely to use the most intensive medical services at the end of their lives compared with their urban counterparts, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Cognitive Performance Linked to Risk of Falls in Elderly

TUESDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Among very elderly patients, there is an association between cognitive performance and risk of falls, according to a study in the August issue of the Journal of the American Geriatric Society.

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Illegal Blood Alcohol Levels Doubled Over Four Years

MONDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The number of patients in northern Ireland with blood alcohol levels that far exceeded the legal limit when admitted to emergency department increased 113 percent over a four-year period, according to a study published in the September issue of the Emergency Medicine Journal.

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Americans Support Better Coordination of Health Care

THURSDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Survey results suggest that Americans strongly support better coordination of health care and that rising medical costs are a serious concern for many low- and middle-income people. The survey, conducted on behalf of The Commonwealth Fund, also found that many people support fundamental changes or a complete rebuilding of the health care system.

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Socioeconomic Status Linked to Late-Life Disability

THURSDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- While the link between extreme poverty and poor health has long been recognized, a new report in the Aug. 17 New England Journal of Medicine extends the socioeconomic disparity to functional limitation and disability later in life.

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Light-at-Night Study Produces Inconsistent Results

THURSDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence is mixed in support of the light-at-night hypothesis, which proposes that exposure to artificial lighting at night could increase women's breast cancer risk by suppressing the normal nocturnal rise in melatonin, according to a study in the Aug. 15 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

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Most ED Patients with S. Aureus Infection Have MRSA

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, is the most common cause of skin and soft-tissue infections in patients presenting to emergency departments in 11 U.S. cities, according to a study conducted in August 2004 and reported in the Aug. 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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High Dietary Copper Linked to Faster Cognitive Decline

TUESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly individuals who consume 1.6 mg or more of copper per day and whose diets are high in saturated and trans fats have a faster rate of cognitive decline than other patients, according to a report in the August issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Doctors' Views on Disclosure of Errors Varies Widely

TUESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- There is a wide variation across the medical profession when it comes to disclosing medical errors to patients, with the visibility of the error and medical specialty both playing a role, according to two studies in the August 14/28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Nurse-Led Counseling Cuts Heart Failure Hospitalizations

TUESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- A nurse-led disease management program for patients with ambulatory congestive heart failure may improve functioning and decrease hospitalizations, according to a study conducted in an ethnically diverse community and reported in the Aug. 15 Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Hib Vaccine Cuts Childhood Disease in Kenya

MONDAY, Aug. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Introduction of the Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine into the routine infant immunization program in Kenya has dramatically reduced disease incidence in young children, according to a report in the Aug. 9 Journal of the American Medical Association.

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U.K. Drug Trial Disaster Sheds New Light on Cytokine Storm

MONDAY, Aug. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The severe adverse reaction of six healthy volunteers in the United Kingdom during a phase 1 drug trial of TGN1412 sheds new light on the natural course of the cytokine storm and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and must not prevent future research, according to a paper and editorial published online Aug. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CPR Knowledge is Lacking in Seriously Ill Patients

THURSDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Seriously ill hospitalized patients lack information about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and more than one-third of them do not wish to discuss end-of-life preferences with their physician, according to study results published in the August issue of Chest.

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America's Oldest Citizens Are Content with Their Lives

THURSDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of Americans who are older than 99 report being satisfied with their life choices, and more attribute their longevity to spirituality and faith than genes or medical care, according to a survey by the Evercare unit of UnitedHealth Group.

Lawn Mowers Important Cause of Childhood Injury

THURSDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Lawn mowers are a significant source of childhood injury, which may be avoided by improvements in lawn mower design incorporating passive protection, according to the results of a study published in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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Inadequate Staffing Ups Infection Risk in NICU

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Too few nurses or having nurses with too heavy a workload may increase the risk of bloodstream infections among infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), according to a report in the August issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Children on Antidepressants More Likely to Attempt Suicide

TUESDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children and teens, but not adults, who take antidepressants are more likely to attempt and complete suicide, concludes a new study in the August issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry. The findings support a recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration warning about risk of suicide among children and teens taking antidepressants.

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Children Under 5 Most Likely to Get Hurt on Escalators

TUESDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children younger than 5 years of age are more likely than their older counterparts to sustain escalator-related injuries and more likely to suffer injuries to the hand when entrapped, according to a study in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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Younger, Older Teens View Pregnancy Differently

TUESDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Younger teens view pregnancy differently than older teens, with more of the former believing a baby can enhance relationships, but also more inclined to expect upheaval, according to a report in the August issue of Pediatrics.

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FDA Approves Next Season's Influenza Vaccine

FRIDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved this year's seasonal influenza vaccines. The vaccines include the new strains of virus judged likely to cause flu in the Northern Hemisphere in 2006-2007.

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Breast-Fed Babies Respond Better to Stress in Later Life

THURSDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Children who were breast-fed as babies respond better than their counterparts who were not breast-fed to psychosocial stresses later in life, according to a study published online Aug. 3 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Wide Variations Seen in Hospice Enrollment Rates

THURSDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Among terminally ill cancer patients, hospice enrollment is more significantly influenced by the health centers in which they're treated than by their individual characteristics, according to a study published in the Aug. 2 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Lessons Learned from the 2005 Indiana Measles Outbreak

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Important lessons can be learned from a 2005 measles outbreak in Indiana that can help sustain the elimination of this disease in the United States, according to a case series investigation in the Aug. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Tool Estimates Portion Size of Wedge-Shaped Foods

TUESDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- An adjustable wedge is more accurate than a ruler in estimating the portion size of wedge-shaped foods such as cake and pizza in about one-third of cases, although substantial misestimation still occurs, according to a report in the August issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Physician's Briefing