February 2007 Briefing - Nursing

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for February 2007. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Antiplatelet Antibodies Linked to Vancomycin

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients treated with vancomycin can develop antiplatelet antibodies that can cause thrombocytopenia and severe bleeding, according to study findings published in the March 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Four in 10 U.S. Children Witness Arguments at Home

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Four out of 10 American children are exposed to heated or violent arguments in the home, according to a report published in the February supplemental issue of the journal Pediatrics.

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Baxter Healthcare Infusion Pump Back on the Market

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the modified Colleague Volumetric Infusion Pump for marketing after the manufacturer, Baxter Healthcare Corporation of Deerfield, Ill., addressed the problems that caused a series of product recalls in 2005.

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HPV Affects 25 Million Women in United States

TUESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- One-quarter of American women between the ages of 14 and 59 are infected with human papillomavirus (HPV), according to a report published in the Feb. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Nearly half of sexually active women in their early 20s are infected.

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Antioxidant Supplements Linked with Higher Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Antioxidant supplements such as beta-carotene, vitamin A and vitamin E may increase the risk of mortality, according to a meta-analysis in the Feb. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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FDA Urges Post-Vaccine Monitoring for Intussusception

TUESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- There have been 28 post-marketing reports of intussusception in infants given the RotaTeq rotavirus vaccine, although it's not clear if the cases are due to the vaccine or random occurrences, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Pediatricians should look out for the signs and symptoms of intussusception in infants following vaccination.

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Athlete Misuse of Growth Hormone Can Cause Diabetes

TUESDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Misuse of growth hormone by athletes may cause diabetes, according to a case report published online Feb. 26 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. In the case, the athlete's diabetic condition resolved after treatment with insulin and intravenous fluids.

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Frequent Analgesic Use Linked to Hypertension Risk

MONDAY, Feb. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Frequent use of analgesics, including aspirin, acetaminophen and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), is associated with an increased risk of hypertension, according to a report published Feb. 26 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Avandia Increases Fracture Risk in Diabetic Women

THURSDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration reported this week that rosiglitazone increases the risk of fractures in women with type 2 diabetes. The tablets, made by GlaxoSmithKline, include Avandia (rosiglitazone maleate), Avandaryl (rosiglitazone maleate and glimepiride), and Avandamet (rosiglitazone maleate and metformin hydrochloride).

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ADHD Drug Makers to Warn of Cardiovascular Risk

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has instructed the manufacturers of 15 approved drugs for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), including Adderall, Ritalin and Strattera, to prepare Patient Medication Guides highlighting the risk of psychiatric symptoms and cardiovascular problems associated with the drugs. The agency has received reports of sudden death, myocardial infarction and stroke in patients with certain risk factors or underlying conditions taking typical doses of ADHD medications.

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Psychopathology Prevalent in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients seeking bariatric surgery often have a current or past history of psychiatric disorders, which may have an impact on recovery from the surgery and long-term weight loss and maintenance, according to a report in the February issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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U.S. Health Care Costs Will Top $4 Trillion by 2016

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Within 10 years, U.S. spending on health care is expected to double to $4.1 trillion and it will consume about 20 percent of every dollar spent, according to a study in the Feb. 21 issue of Health Affairs.

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Pulse Pressure a Risk Factor for Atrial Fibrillation

TUESDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Pulse pressure is a risk factor for new-onset atrial fibrillation in patients as they age, according to the results of a study published in the Feb. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Advance Directives Improve End-of-Life Communication

MONDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The use of advance directives by a terminally ill patient is associated with better doctor-patient communication in the last months of life, but opportunities remain to improve the quality of end-of-life care, researchers report in the February issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Continuous Infusion Better Than Bolus for Septic Shock

FRIDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Treating septic shock patients with a continuous infusion of hydrocortisone, rather than bolus injections, reduces hyperglycemia and the attendant risk of developing insulin dependency, as well as nurse workload, according to the results of a study published Feb. 15 in the open access journal Critical Care.

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FDA Warns of Salmonella Contamination in Peanut Butter

THURSDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a warning Thursday that certain jars of Peter Pan and Great Value peanut butter may be contaminated with Salmonella Tennessee, and should be discarded. ConAgra Foods, the manufacturer of both products, voluntarily recalled the jars, which have a product code starting with "2111" on the lid.

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Company Halts Manufacture of Faulty Infusion Pumps

TUESDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced that Cardinal Health 303 Inc., of San Diego, formerly known as Alaris Medical Systems, Inc., has agreed to stop manufacturing and distributing its Signature Edition infusion pumps due to a design defect.

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Siestas Linked to Lower Heart Disease Mortality

MONDAY, Feb. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Taking siestas of any frequency or duration is associated with about a one-third reduction in mortality from coronary heart disease, particularly in working men, according to study findings published in the Feb. 12 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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FDA Changes Ketek Label, Removes Two Indications

MONDAY, Feb. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has stepped up the warning label for Ketek (telithromycin), and removed two of the three indications for the antibiotic. A joint advisory committee met in December and concluded that the risks of the drug outweigh the benefits for acute bacterial sinusitis and acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. Ketek can still be used to treat mild-to-moderately severe community-acquired pneumonia.

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Brief Intervention Cuts Alcohol Use in Pregnant Women

MONDAY, Feb. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who consume alcohol are more likely to abstain if they are given a brief talk about the dangers of alcohol consumption to the fetus, and tend to have higher birth weight infants than their counterparts who do not have any intervention, researchers report in the February issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

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U.S. Drug Overdose Deaths on Rise, Particularly in Women

FRIDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Accidental poisoning among teenagers and adults has increased in the United States, mostly due to drug overdoses, and is now the second-leading cause of unintentional death after motor-vehicle accidents, according to new data in the Feb. 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Weak Feeding in Infancy Linked to Failure to Thrive

THURSDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Failure to thrive in infancy remains an ill-defined diagnosis but may be linked to weak sucking ability in the first eight weeks of life and the type and efficiency of feeding in infants older than eight weeks, according to two reports in the February issue of the Archives of Disease in Childhood. Socioeconomic status and parental education do not seem to play a role, the studies suggest.

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Orlistat Gets Over-the-Counter Approval from FDA

THURSDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the adult weight-loss aid orlistat for over-the-counter (OTC) sale, although higher doses of the drug will still require a prescription. The drug came onto the market in 1999. The OTC capsules will be manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline and marketed under the name Alli.

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Clomiphene Helps Infertility Due to Polycystic Ovary

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Clomiphene is significantly more effective than metformin in treating infertility in women with polycystic ovary syndrome, but with a higher risk of multiple pregnancies, researchers report in the Feb. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Financial Benefits of Pediatric Exclusivity Program Assessed

TUESDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The economic return for pharmaceutical companies that conduct pediatric trials in exchange for six extra months of market exclusivity varies widely, according to a report in the Feb. 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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U.S. Caesareans, Unmarried Mothers at Record Highs

TUESDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The number of unmarried women and women over 30 giving birth, and the number of Caesarean deliveries, are at or near record highs, according to the Annual Summary of Vital Statistics: 2005, published in the February issue of Pediatrics.

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More U.S. Patients Over Age 80 Are Starting Dialysis

TUESDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Since 1996, increasing numbers of people in their 80s and 90s have initiated dialysis, but their odds of one-year survival are still only about 50 percent, according to a report published in the Feb. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Modest Quality Boost in Pay-for-Performance Hospitals

MONDAY, Feb. 5 (HealthDay News) -- A demonstration project funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services suggests that pay-for-performance can improve the quality of care in hospitals from 2.6 to 4.1 percent compared with hospitals that adopt public reporting as a quality improvement measure, according to a report in the Feb. 1 New England Journal of Medicine.

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Few Cardiovascular Trials Report Sex-Specific Results

FRIDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Only about one-quarter of cardiovascular clinical trials report sex-specific results compared with about half of trials sponsored by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, which mandates reporting of such results, according to a report in the February issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Use of Chronic Care Model Improves Diabetes Care

FRIDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The Chronic Care Model, which aims to improve the way chronically ill patients are treated in primary practice, can be easily implemented and is very effective in improving outcomes in diabetic patients, according to a report published in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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HIV/AIDS Rates Drop Among Blacks in Florida

THURSDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- HIV/AIDS rates among blacks in Florida dropped by 8.2 percent per year in men and 10.2 percent per year in women from 1999 through 2004, according to a report in the Feb. 2 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. The decline was greater than that seen among other racial/ethnic groups.

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Index Predicts Hip Fracture, Mortality in Older Women

THURSDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- A four-item index based on age, weight, previous fracture and mobility can predict the risk of hip fracture and mortality in women aged 70 and older, according to a report in the January/February issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Physician's Briefing