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February 2012 Briefing - Nursing

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for February 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Bisphosphonates, Annual BMD Screen Up Fracture Prevention

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In a hypothetical model of postmenopausal women receiving adjuvant aromatase inhibitors (AIs) for hormone receptor (HR)-positive early breast cancer (EBC), baseline and annual bone mineral density (BMD) screening followed by selective treatment with oral bisphosphonates for those diagnosed with osteoporosis is a cost-effective strategy, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Amantadine Speeds Recovery From Consciousness Disorders

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Amantadine improves the rate of functional recovery during active treatment in patients with severe traumatic brain injury, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Nicotine Patches Don't Help Pregnant Women Stop Smoking

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of nicotine-replacement therapy to behavioral cessation support does not increase the rate of smoking abstinence in pregnant women, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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More Added Sugar Calories Come From Food Than Drink

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Added sugar consumption is highest in non-Hispanic white children and adolescents and comes mainly from food, not beverages, consumed at home, according to a February data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Despite Benefits of Selenium, Supplements May Be Harmful

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- While selenium is necessary for good health, levels that are too high can be harmful, and people whose serum selenium levels are already at least 122 µ/L should not take supplements, according to a review published online Feb. 29 in The Lancet.

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Hearing Loss Linked to Falls in Those Under Age 70

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Hearing loss is associated with increased odds of falling, according to research published in the Feb. 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Group Art Therapy Not Found to Be Helpful in Schizophrenia

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Group art therapy does not improve the mental health or social functioning of patients with schizophrenia, according to a study published online Feb. 28 in BMJ.

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Behavioral Intervention Slims Waistlines of Obese Men

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A behavioral intervention to improve physical activity and diet in obese patients is more effective at slimming the waistlines of men than women, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Neurophysiological Deficits Persist Following Concussion

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For athletes who suffer a concussion, neurophysiological deficits persist and are present at least six months following a concussion, and adolescents appear to be more vulnerable to the consequences of concussion, according to a study published in the March issue of Brain Injury.

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Statin Users Less Likely to Suffer From Depression

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with coronary heart disease, use of statins is associated with reduced risk of having or developing depression, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.

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Ototoxicity Rates in Children Receiving Carboplatin Studied

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Retinoblastoma patients who are younger than 6 months of age at the start of carboplatin treatment experience a higher incidence of ototoxicity, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Inactivity and Obesity Relate to Cognitive Impairment in Lupus

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Physical inactivity and obesity are associated with impaired cognitive function, especially executive functions, in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), according to research published online Feb. 15 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Care Protocol for Comatose Patients May Need Revision

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Although neurological tests are highly reliable predictors of death in patients who remain in a coma following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), withdrawal-of-treatment decisions may need to be delayed for those who undergo mild hypothermia therapy, according to a Dutch study published in the February issue of the Annals of Neurology.

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FDA Approves Label Changes for Statins

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The recommendation to remove routine monitoring of liver enzymes is among safety label changes recently approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for statins, according to a Feb. 28 Drug Safety Communication issued by the agency.

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Sleeping Pill Use Linked to Greater Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Even relatively small doses of sleeping pills are associated with a more than three-fold higher risk of death, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in BMJ Open.

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Adults With Disabilities at Increased Risk of Violence

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with disabilities face an increased risk of violence, with an even higher risk evident for those with mental illness, according to a review published online Feb. 28 in The Lancet.

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Dose-Response Link Between Tanning Bed Use, Skin Cancer

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Use of tanning beds, especially in high school and college, is associated with an increased risk of skin cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Bidirectional Causality for Attention Issues, Video Games

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Children who spend more time playing video games subsequently have more attention problems and impulsivity, and those who are more impulsive or have attention problems spend more time playing video games, according to a study published in the January issue of Psychology of Popular Media Culture.

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Fast Heart Rate Predictive of Cardiac Events in High-Risk HTN

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A fast heart rate is a strong predictor of adverse cardiac events in patients with high-risk hypertension, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Cognitive Development Stable for Low Birth Weight Infants

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For very low birth weight (VLBW) babies, there is good stability of cognitive development over time, with a strong correlation between assessments at 2 years of corrected age and at age 5, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Rapid Flu Tests Effective for Ruling In (But Not Out) Diagnosis

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Rapid influenza tests are useful for diagnosing influenza; and oral oseltamivir and inhaled zanamivir may be beneficial for the treatment of influenza, according to two reviews published online Feb. 27 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Less Than Half of New Diabetes Patients Achieve A1C Goals

TUESDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Less than half of newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes achieve A1C <7 percent, and those that do achieve it more likely started with lower A1C levels, according to a study published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

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Chemo for Breast Cancer Tied to Long-Term Cognitive Issues

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Women treated with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and fluorouracil (CMF) chemotherapy for breast cancer still experience neuropsychological problems decades later, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Low Back Pain Counseling Strategy Ups Return to Work

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Combining a disability evaluation with proactive counseling for workers with low back pain (LBP) results in a higher return-to-work rate, which is statistically significant at one year, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in Spine.

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Febrile Children Self-Referred to ER Usually Less Severely Ill

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In 45 percent of self-referred cases, parents properly judge their child's febrile illness as urgent when they bring their child to the emergency department, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Heartburn Controlled With Step Down to Once Daily Therapy

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients who take twice-daily proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, are able to successfully step down to management of heartburn with a daily dose of dexlansoprazole modified release (MR), according to a study published in the March issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Many Obese With CKD Want to Lose Weight

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Many overweight patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) want to lose weight and are utilizing weight loss methods that may further kidney damage, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in the International Journal of Obesity.

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AAP Recommends HPV Vaccine for Boys, Too

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) now recommends the routine vaccination of both males and females against human papillomavirus (HPV), according to a policy statement published online Feb. 27 in Pediatrics.

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AAP Reaffirms Breastfeeding Policy

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Breastfeeding should be considered a basic health issue, rather than a lifestyle choice, and as such, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) reaffirms its recommendations for exclusive breastfeeding for a baby's first six months of life, according to a policy statement published online Feb. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Combo of Diabetes, Depression Increases Post-MI Mortality

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Having both diabetes and depression significantly increases the risk of dying in the years following a heart attack, beyond the increased risk from either condition alone, according to a study published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

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Active Video Games May Not Increase Activity in Children

MONDAY, Feb. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Receiving active video games does not increase children's physical activity levels compared with receiving inactive video games, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Body Clock Linked to Sudden Cardiac Death

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A body clock-dependent protein is associated with variations in electrical stability in the heart, which may explain why people are at higher risk of sudden cardiac death in the morning, according to research published online Feb. 22 in Nature.

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ASD Meds More Commonly Used by Teens With Comorbid ADHD

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to use psychotropic medication if they also have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published in the Dec. 23 issue of the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

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Allergy-Related Diseases Affect Majority of Children

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Eczema, asthma, and rhinitis affect more than 50 percent of children up to age 12, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in Allergy.

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Variable Mortality Risk for Antipsychotic Use in Elderly

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of mortality associated with antipsychotic drug use among elderly residents in nursing homes in the United States varies between drugs, according to a study published online Feb. 23 in BMJ.

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Oncogenic HPV Rarely Present in Breast Cancer Tissues

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to numerous reports, oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types are rarely present in mammary epithelium of patients with breast cancer, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of Cancer.

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Expression of Genes for Platelet Aggregation Up Post-CABG

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, there is increased expression of genes involved in platelet aggregation, including cyclooxygenase-1 (COX1), glycoprotein (GP)IIb and GPIIIa, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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UVB Preferred for Treatment of Moderate to Severe Psoriasis

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Ultraviolet B (UVB) is preferred by dermatologists for first-line treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis in both healthy male and female patients, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Male Pattern Baldness Linked to Prostate Symptoms

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Early-onset of male pattern baldness (androgenetic alopecia [AGA]) may be a marker of male urinary symptoms associated with an enlarged prostate, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Bolus Calculation, Flexible Insulin Up Diabetes Control

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A structured course teaching the benefits of automated bolus calculator (ABC) use and flexible intensive insulin therapy (FIIT) improves metabolic control and satisfaction in patients with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in Diabetes Care.

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Plasma Protein S100-B Useful Screening Tool in Head Trauma

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Measuring plasma levels of the protein S100-B has a high negative predictive value compared with computed tomography (CT) scans for patients with minor head injuries, according to research published in the March issue of the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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Timeliness of Diagnosis Varies by Cancer and Patient

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- There is wide variation between cancer types in the proportion of patients who visit their general practitioner three or more times before being referred to the hospital, according to a study published online Feb. 24 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Model Predicts Death Due to Acetaminophen Overdose

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Model for Acetaminophen-induced Liver Damage (MALD), a mathematical model that utilizes commonly obtained laboratory values, including overdose amount and time elapsed since overdose, is effective for predicting outcomes in patients with acute liver failure due to acetaminophen overdose, according to research published online Feb. 13 in Hepatology.

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Complications Seen in 40 Percent of Living Liver Donors

FRIDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Complications of living donor hepatic lobectomy occur in 40 percent of cases, with the vast majority resolving within one year, according to research published online Feb. 15 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Citrus Fruit Linked to Lower Risk of Ischemic Stroke

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Eating higher amounts of a compound (flavonoid) found in citrus fruits may lower the risk of stroke, according to a study published online Feb. 23 in Stroke.

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Virtual Colonoscopy Useful in Screening Older Adults

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Computed tomography (CT) colonography is useful as a primary screening method for detecting colorectal neoplasia in adults over the age of 65 years, with sensitivity and specificity similar to that seen for younger adults, according to research published online Feb. 23 in Radiology.

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Assay, Algorithm Promising for Detection of Trisomies 21, 18

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A novel biochemical assay (Digital Analysis of Selected Regions [DANSR]) combined with an algorithm (Fetal-fraction Optimized Risk of Trisomy Evaluation [FORTE]) accurately identifies the risk of fetal trisomy 21 and 18 from maternal-blood cell-free DNA (cfDNA), according to two studies published online Jan. 27 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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WHO Criteria May Overestimate Fatality Rate for Avian Flu

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Based on cases in hospitalized patients confirmed by the World Health Organization (WHO), the current estimated overall case fatality rate for H5N1 infection in humans is greater than 50 percent, but the stringent criteria for confirmation of the infection mean the actual fatality rate may be much lower, according to a meta-analysis published online Feb. 23 in Science.

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Prevalence of Screening for Lynch Syndrome Varies

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Screening for Lynch syndrome, the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer, after a colorectal cancer diagnosis is common at comprehensive cancer centers but not community hospitals, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Family History Ups Risk of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Family history of thyroid cancer in a first-degree relative may be associated with an increased risk of sporadic differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), according to a study published in the March 1 issue of Cancer.

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Bisphosphonate Use Linked to Reduced Colorectal Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to bisphosphonates (BPs) is associated with a reduction in the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), a reduction that is significant only for risedronic acid, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of Cancer.

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Aspirin and Clopidogrel Improve Claudication Distance

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stable intermittent claudication due to peripheral arterial disease, low-dose aspirin appears to work as well as clopidogrel when given in conjunction with walking rehabilitation to improve initial claudication distance (ICD) and absolute claudication distance (ACD), according to research published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease.

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Stability Predicts Treatment Success for Vitiligo

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with vitiligo, a depigmenting disorder characterized by loss of melanocytes from the epidermis, melanocyte transplantation is more likely to be successful in patients whose disease has been stable for longer periods, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Low Neuro-Psych Functioning for Long-Term Glioma Survivors

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term survivors of childhood high-grade glioma have intellectual functioning within low-average ranges and low neuropsychological functioning, but the majority of patients report within or above normal quality of life, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Cognitive Rehabilitation Improves Brain Function in MS

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrates that patients with relapsing-remitting (RR) multiple sclerosis (MS) who respond to 12 weeks of computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation with improved attention, information processing, and executive functions have modified brain activity, according to research published in the March issue of Radiology.

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Pseudo-Prospective Analyses ID Alcohol Recovery Correlates

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prospective analysis of correlates of alcohol recovery compare favorably with pseudo-prospective studies with time-dependent covariates, but differ from cross-sectional analyses, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Cancer Risk Up in Bilateral Retinoblastoma Survivors

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For survivors of bilateral retinoblastoma (Rb), family history is associated with an increased risk of second cancers (SCs), especially melanoma, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Defibrotide Prophylaxis Cuts Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease

THURSDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For pediatric patients undergoing hemopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT), defibrotide prophylaxis may reduce the incidence of hepatic veno-occlusive disease, according to the results of a phase 3 open-label randomized controlled study published online Feb. 23 in The Lancet.

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Colonoscopic Removal of Adenomas Cuts CRC Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Colonoscopic removal of adenomatous polyps reduces colorectal cancer mortality, and interim analysis shows that fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) yields similar results to colonoscopy; however, more polyps are identified with colonoscopy screening compared to FIT, according to two studies published in the Feb. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Mammography-Detected Breast CA Rates Increasing Over Time

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- From 1990 to 2008 there was a significant increase in mammography-detected breast cancer, which coincided with lower-stage disease detection, according to research published in the March issue of Radiology.

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Following Exercise Guidelines Is Safe During Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The safety of exercise during pregnancy according to existing public health guidelines has been reaffirmed for both mothers and their fetuses, according to research published in the March issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Study IDs the Rationalizations of Social Smokers

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Social smokers do not see themselves as addicted smokers and often smoke in response to group norms or because of excessive alcohol consumption, according to research published online Feb. 20 in Tobacco Control.

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High VEGF Signaling Score Tied to Lung Cancer Prognosis

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A high vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling score correlates with good prognosis in patients with early squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Teenage Drinking Influenced by Media Exposure to Alcohol

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Media exposure, including viewing films featuring alcohol and alcohol-related merchandise, influence both onset age of teenage alcohol consumption and binge drinking, whereas family drinking characteristics influence only onset age of alcohol consumption, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in BMJ Open.

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Endometriosis Linked to Higher Ovarian Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A history of endometriosis increases the risk of developing ovarian cancer, although the increased risk is restricted to specific subtypes of invasive ovarian cancer, according to a meta-analysis published online Feb. 22 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Elevated Homocysteine, Heart Disease Link Questioned

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated homocysteine levels are not associated with a greater risk of coronary heart disease when considering unpublished data, suggesting publication bias, according to a study available online Feb. 21 in PLoS Medicine.

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Abortive Acupuncture Reduces Allergen-Induced Itch

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture and cetirizine both reduce type I hypersensitivity itch better than placebo or no intervention, according to an article published online Feb. 8 in Allergy.

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Skin Cancer Frequency in Chronic Leg Ulcers >10 Percent

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic leg ulcers (CLUs) that don't heal after three months of appropriate treatment have an overall skin cancer frequency of 10.4 percent, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in the Archives of Dermatology.

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C-Peptide Still Produced After Decades of Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients who have had type 1 diabetes for decades can still produce C-peptide and respond to hyperglycemia, suggesting residual β-cell function, according to a study published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

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Highest Diabetes Death Rates Seen in Trials Selecting for CKD

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In type 2 diabetes patients selected for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with the highest overall risk of mortality, according to a review published online Feb. 21 in the Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease.

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Medtronic Stent Approved to Treat Coronary Artery Disease

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Medtronic's Resolute Integrity Drug-Eluting Stent (DES) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for people with coronary artery disease (CAD), the Minneapolis-based company said in a news release.

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Replacing PPSV23 With PCV13 May Prevent More Pneumonia

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A model shows that replacing the current 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) with the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) might prevent more pneumococcal disease, while remaining economically reasonable, according to a study published in the Feb. 22 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Small Risk of Febrile Seizures With DTaP-IPV-Hib Vaccine

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The combined diphtheria-tetanus toxoids-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus-Haemophilus influenza type b (DTaP-IPV-Hib) vaccine is associated with a small increased risk of febrile seizures on the day of the first and second vaccinations, according to a study published in the Feb. 22 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Women With MI More Likely to Present Without Chest Pain

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Women suffering a myocardial infarction (MI) are more likely than men of the same age to present without chest pain and have higher in-hospital mortality, according to a study published in the Feb. 22 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Maternal Flu Vaccine Improves Health of Unborn Child

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccinating pregnant women against the influenza virus appears to have a significant positive effect on infant birth weight, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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MRSA Screening Protocol Aids in Peds Open Airway Surgery

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A screening and antibiotic treatment regimen for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in children undergoing open airway surgery may be helpful for minimizing MRSA-associated postoperative infections in MRSA-colonized patients, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Transplanted Leg Hair Can Soften Hairline Appearance

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Transplantation of leg hair follicles can soften the appearance of the hairline in patients receiving hair transplants, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Insulin Acts As Satiety Signal in Postprandial Period

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Brain insulin may act as a satiety signal during the postprandial period and is associated with decreased appetite and reduced intake of highly palatable food, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in Diabetes.

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Pharmacist-Led Intervention Reduces Medical Errors

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For clinics with computerized medical records, a pharmacist-led intervention significantly reduces the risk of medical errors and is likely to be cost-effective, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in The Lancet.

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Plastic Surgery Gives Younger Appearance to Aging Face

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Aesthetic facial plastic surgery results in a reduction in perceived age, with the effect more substantial for those who undergo multiple procedures, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Resistance Training Improves Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes, aerobic training and resistance training both result in improved metabolic features, insulin sensitivity, and reduced abdominal fat, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in Diabetes Care.

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Dermatologist Density Linked to Melanoma Mortality Rates

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Melanoma mortality rates are significantly lower in U.S. counties with 0.001 to 2.0 dermatologists per 100,000 people, compared to those with no dermatologist, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Alcohol Dependence Significant Problem for U.S. Surgeons

TUESDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable number of U.S. surgeons have alcohol abuse and dependence, which is more likely in those who have recently reported major errors, are burned out, and are depressed, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Surgical Spinal Cord Monitoring May Predict Paralysis

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Intraoperative monitoring (IOM) of the spinal cord with somatosensory and transcranial electrical motor evoked potentials (EPs) during spinal surgery and certain chest surgeries can help predict surgery-related paralysis and possibly allow for intervention, according to new guidelines published by the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) in the Feb. 21 issue of Neurology.

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By 2007, Hep C Superseded HIV As Cause of Death in U.S.

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Hepatitis C virus (HCV) superseded HIV as a cause of death by 2007; and birth cohort screening is cost-effective for HCV, according to two studies published in the Feb. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Substituting Fructose for Other Carbs Doesn't Up Weight Gain

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence suggests that fructose is unlikely to cause weight gain when substituted for other carbohydrates in diets with similar numbers of calories, but does increase weight gain in hypercaloric diets, according to a review published in the Feb. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Infectious Disease Burden Rising in New Zealand

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital admissions for infectious disease have risen over the last two decades in New Zealand, with infectious disease now being the biggest contributor to hospital admissions of any cause, particularly among the native population and the socioeconomically disadvantaged, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in The Lancet.

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White Matter Changes Precede Manifestations of Autism

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The development of white matter pathways is abnormal in infants before manifestations of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), according to a study published online Feb. 17 in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Classification-Based Therapy No Better for Back Pain

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of patients with lower back pain (LBP) using a classification-based physical therapy approach shows no statistically significant superiority to treatment with usual physical therapy care, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Spine.

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Psychiatric History Common in Gender Identity Disorder

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Young patients presenting with gender identity disorder often have significant psychiatric history; and youth in the top decile of gender nonconformity have elevated exposure to abuse, according to two studies published online Feb. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Group-Based Lifestyle Program Beneficial in Prediabetes

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A group-based diabetes education and lifestyle program is associated with improvements in healthy eating, physical activity, and motivation and mood, and reduces waist circumference and weight in individuals with prediabetes, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in Diabetes Care.

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Normal Breast Protein Linked to Cancer Development

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Trefoil (TFF3) protein, which maintains the integrity of the epithelial surface in the normal breast, is highly expressed in well-differentiated tumors, correlating with low histological grade, and also has an expression profile which is consistent with a role in breast cancer progression and metastasis, according to a study published in the March issue of The American Journal of Pathology.

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CT Myelography More Accurately Detects CSF Leakage

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage may be detected more accurately in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) using epidural collection on computed tomography myelography (CTM) rather than paraspinal radioisotope (RI) accumulation on radioisotope cisternography (RIC), according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of Spine.

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Nicotine Replacement Therapy Linked With Infantile Colic

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal smoking or use of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of infantile colic in offspring, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Lipid Sensor GPR120 Linked to Obesity in Mice and Humans

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A protein that acts as a lipid sensor, GPR120, can lead to obesity when defective in mice and humans, according to a study published online Feb. 19 in Nature.

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X-Chromosome Gene Variant Linked to SIDS in Boys

MONDAY, Feb. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A gene variant on the X-chromosome is associated with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) only in boys, particularly those who die at the ages of highest SIDS prevalence, according to a study published online Feb. 20 in Pediatrics.

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High Uric Acid Level Predictive of Adverse Cardiac Events

FRIDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A high serum uric acid level is an independent predictor of in-hospital and long-term adverse cardiac events in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to research published in the Feb. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Pregnancy Complications Tied to CVD Later in Life

FRIDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy-related complications, including hypertensive disorders and diabetes, may identify women at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life, according to a study published online Feb. 17 in Circulation.

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Improved Availability of Sunscreen Increases Usage

FRIDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Improving college female athletes' access to sunscreen by placing it in golf bags and locker rooms increases its use, according to research published online Feb. 10 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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MRI Alone Not Ideal in Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis

FRIDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should not be used as a stand-alone test to diagnose pulmonary embolism (PE), according to a study published online Feb. 9 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Donepezil Improves Symptoms in Dementia With Lewy Bodies

FRIDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), 5 and 10 mg/day doses of donepezil are associated with significant improvements in behavioral, cognitive, and global symptoms, according to a phase II study published online Feb. 8 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Women With RA, Lupus Have Fewer Children Than Planned

FRIDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of young women diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have fewer children than they had hoped for, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Aphasia Increases Cost of Care After Ischemic Stroke

FRIDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- In ischemic stroke patients, aphasia is associated with greater morbidity, higher mortality, and increased length of stay, and adds $1,703 per patient to the cost of stroke-related care, according to research published online Feb. 16 in Stroke.

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2002 to 2008 Saw Increase in Partial Nephrectomy Use

FRIDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, the use of partial nephrectomy procedures to manage renal masses in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) increased significantly from 2002 to 2008, according to research published in the March issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Study Evaluates Clinical Value of Stroke Biomarkers

FRIDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- While 136 different stroke biomarkers have been identified, the clinical value of these biomarkers remains unclear, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Smoking Cessation Drug May Also Reduce Drinking

FRIDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The smoking cessation drug varenicline (VAR) may also reduce alcohol consumption in social drinkers by increasing alcohol's aversive effects, according to a study published online Feb. 16 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Hyperuricemia Linked to Poor Maternal-Fetal Outcomes

FRIDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- During pregnancy, elevated plasma uric acid levels are associated with an increased risk of adverse fetal and maternal outcomes in women with preeclampsia or benign gestational hypertension, according to an article published in the March issue of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology.

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Ectopic Pregnancy Death Rate Spikes in Florida

THURSDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Although Florida's rate of ectopic pregnancy-related deaths was on a par with that of the rest of the nation in 2008, about 0.6 deaths per 100,000 births, the number jumped to 2.5 per 100,000 in 2009 to 2010, according to research published in the Feb. 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Overdose Prevention Programs Using Opioid Antagonist

THURSDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Naloxone, an opioid antagonist, is being used by at least 188 overdose prevention programs in the United States, but many states with high death rates due to heroin or other opioid overdose do not include naloxone distribution in their programs, according to research published in the Feb. 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Chickens Harbor E. coli Found in Human UTIs

THURSDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Retail purchased chicken may be the source of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) that causes urinary tract infections (UTIs) in humans, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Female Sexual Function Improves After Lesion Surgery

THURSDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Women with deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) who undergo laparoscopic excision and postoperative combined oral contraceptive (COC) therapy have improved postoperative sexual function, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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High Omega-3 Intake Slows Rate of Visual Acuity Decline

THURSDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with typical retinitis pigmentosa, treatment with vitamin A combined with an omega-3-rich diet slows the decline in distance and retinal visual acuities, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Smoking Bans Lead to Less, Not More, Smoking at Home

THURSDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Smoke-free legislation leads to less smoking in smokers' homes, not more, according to research published online Feb. 13 in Tobacco Control.

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High Levels of Genital HLA-G Linked With HIV-1 Infection

THURSDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- High genital levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G), a powerful modulator of the immune response, are associated with HIV-1 infection in Beninese commercial sex workers (CSWs), according to a study published online in PLoS One.

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Age, Nerve Sparing Tied to Post-Prostatectomy Sexual Function

THURSDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Younger men and those who undergo bilateral nerve sparing (BNS) approaches during a robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP) have better recovery of their premorbid orgasmic function compared to older men or men with unilateral or non-nerve sparing surgery, according to a study published in the February issue of the BJU International.

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TTN Mutation Detection Aids Cardiomyopathy Diagnosis

THURSDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Adding sequencing approaches that detect genetic mutations in the TTN gene, which codes for the sarcomere protein titin, would enable earlier diagnosis and improved treatment for patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, according to a study published in the Feb. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Nutrition Therapy Does Not Improve Cancer Mortality Rate

THURSDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Nutritional intervention may improve quality of life (QOL) measures in cancer patients with malnutrition, but has no effect on survival rates, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Excess Mortality for Adults With Young-Onset Diabetes Persists

THURSDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Excess mortality rates persist among adults with young-onset diabetes, and are mainly due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Diabetes Care.

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Thrombopoietic Cytokine Circuit Fuels Ovarian Tumor Growth

THURSDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with ovarian cancer and in a related mouse model, a paracrine loop involving increased hepatic thrombopoietin and tumor-derived interleukin-6 increases platelet counts and promotes tumor growth, according to a study published in the Feb. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Topical Corticosteroids Impair Restoration of Skin Barrier

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Topical corticosteroids offer a more potent anti-inflammatory effect for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD), but they may impair the restoration of the skin barrier and can induce skin atrophy, making topical calcineurin inhibitors more suitable for long-term treatment of the disease, according to a study published in the March issue of Allergy.

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Intramuscular Midazolam As Safe As Intravenous Lorazepam

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Intramuscular midazolam is as safe and effective as intravenous lorazepam for treatment of patients with seizures by paramedics, according to a study published in the Feb. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Semuloparin Prophylaxis Effective in Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Semuloparin, a hemisynthetic, ultra-low-molecular-weight heparin, reduces the incidence of thromboembolic events in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, with no increased risk of a major bleeding event, according to a study published in the Feb. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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AHA: Knowledge Gap Identified for Peripheral Artery Disease

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association (AHA) has updated their guidelines for the management of peripheral artery disease (PAD), specifically in women; the updated guidelines were published online Feb. 15 in Circulation.

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Inactivating Mutation in KISS1 Prevents Pubertal Progression

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- An inactivating mutation has been identified in the KISS1 gene in a consanguineous family, a mutation that results in failure of pubertal progression, according to a report published in the Feb. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Behavioral Therapy Safe and Effective for Hot Flashes

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Women who develop problematic hot flashes after breast cancer treatment, where hormone replacement therapy is contraindicated, see significant improvement in quality of life after receiving behavioral therapy, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Cash Transfers Help Reduce HIV Infection in African Girls

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Financially empowering school-aged girls in Africa may reduce the likelihood of infection by HIV and herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), according to a study published online Feb. 15 in The Lancet.

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Brief Cognitive Screens at Primary Care Visits Effective

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Brief cognitive screening of older patients combined with further evaluation, if needed, in the primary care setting leads to a two- to three-fold increase in the diagnosis of cognitive impairment, including dementia, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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New Data Published on Safety of Leflunomide in Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- New data on birth outcomes provide some reassurance to women who are inadvertently exposed to leflunomide before or during pregnancy, according to research published online Feb. 3 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Anti-apoA-1 Ups Cardiovascular Risk Prediction in RA

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Adding the biomarker anti-apolipoprotein A-1 IgG (anti-apoA-1) to the 10-year Framingham cardiovascular risk score (FRS) significantly improves prediction of cardiovascular events in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Vitamin D Doesn't Improve Cardiac Measures in CKD Patients

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic kidney disease who are treated with the active vitamin D compound, paricalcitol, for 48 weeks do not show improvement in left ventricular mass or certain measures of diastolic dysfunction, compared with patients who received placebo, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Racial Disparity at Many Steps of Renal Transplant Process

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Racial disparities exist with regard to patient access to referral and evaluation for renal transplant, waitlisting, and eventual receipt of a kidney, according to research published in the February issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Hemoglobin A1c, Fasting Plasma Glucose Relationship Studied

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with moderate dysglycemia or early type 2 diabetes, hemoglobin A1c (A1C) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels are strongly related, and this relationship is impacted by oral therapies but not affected by geographic region or patient ethnicity, according to research published online Feb. 8 in Diabetes Care.

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Active Time Improves Youth Cardiometabolic Measures

TUESDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The more time children spend engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), the better their cardiometabolic risk factors, including measures of cholesterol, blood pressure, and waist size, regardless of the amount of time spent sedentary, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Study Finds Antibiotic for Acute Rhinosinusitis Is Not Helpful

TUESDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of acute, uncomplicated rhinosinusitis with amoxicillin does not result in a significant difference in symptoms compared with the use of placebo, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Air Pollutant Exposure Tied to Increased Heart Attack Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Short-term exposure to all major air pollutants, except for ozone, is significantly associated with an increased risk of heart attack, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Lynch Syndrome Linked to Increased Risk of Many Cancers

TUESDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Lynch syndrome, an inherited disorder of cancer susceptibility caused by mutations in a mismatch repair (MMR) gene, face significantly increased risks of a variety of cancers, including breast and pancreatic cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Mediterranean Diet Linked to Healthier Brain Matter

TUESDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Consumption of a Mediterranean-style diet (MeDi) is linked to a reduced burden of white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHV), a marker of small vessel brain damage, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Pollutant Exposure Tied to Cognitive Decline in Elderly

TUESDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) (coarse PM: 2.5 to 10 µm in diameter [PM2.5-10] and fine PM: <2.5 µm in diameter [PM2.5]) is associated with faster cognitive decline in older women, according to a study published in the Feb. 13 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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New Staging System IDs cSCC Risk in Transplant Patients

TUESDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The newly updated seventh edition American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system accurately predicts the risk of recurrence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) in high-risk heart and lung transplant recipients, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Digital Colposcopy Enhances Cervical Cancer Detection

TUESDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Dynamic spectral imaging (DSI) colposcopy is more sensitive for detecting cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2+) in women who are human papillomavirus type 16-positive (HPV16+) than for women who are non-16 high-risk (hr) HPV+, according to a study published online Feb. 3 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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Fibromyalgia Symptoms More Severe in Obese Patients

TUESDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with fibromyalgia who are severely obese have more severe symptoms and lower quality of life (QOL), according to a study published in the February issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Supplements Don't Prevent Cancer in Cardiac Patients

TUESDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Daily supplementation with B vitamins and/or omega-3 fatty acids is not associated with improved cancer outcomes for survivors of cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Patient Satisfaction Linked to Varied Health Care Utilization

TUESDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Higher patient satisfaction is associated with less emergency department use, but with greater inpatient admissions, expenditures, and higher mortality, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Urinary Tract Infections More Common in Obese

TUESDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Obese individuals are more likely to be diagnosed with a urinary tract infection (UTI) or pyelonephritis compared with nonobese individuals, according to a study published in the February issue of Urology.

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Zioptan Eyedrops Approved for Glaucoma, Ocular Hypertension

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Merck's Zioptan drops (tafluprost ophthalmic solution) have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to lower pressure within the eye among people with high blood pressure of the eye (ocular hypertension) or open-angle glaucoma, the most common form of the disease.

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Big Waistline in HIV Tied to Neurocognitive Impairment

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Central obesity is linked to an increased risk of decreased mental functioning in HIV-positive individuals, according to a study published in the Feb. 14 issue of Neurology.

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Lipid Genetics Linked to Type 2 Diabetes Risk

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who are genetically predisposed to have low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol or high levels of triglycerides have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in Diabetes.

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Home O2 Reduces Hospital Admits in Pediatric Bronchiolitis

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Home oxygen (O2) is a safe and effective way to decrease hospital admissions in select pediatric patients with bronchiolitis, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Pediatrics.

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Coronary Artery Disease Linked to Risk of Prostate Cancer

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A significant correlation between coronary artery disease (CAD) and prostate cancer (PCa) has been found among men participating in a prostate drug trial, according to research published online Feb. 7 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Four-Factor Model Predicts Post-Heart Transplant Mortality

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- A risk-prediction tool using four factors at the time of transplant can help predict post-transplant mortality for children undergoing heart transplantation, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Radiation Not Tied to Improved Survival in Advanced NSCLC

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) is not associated with improved survival for elderly patients with N2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Cancer.

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Mindfulness Therapy Improves Bipolar Disorder Symptoms

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) may improve mood, emotional regulation, well-being, and functioning in individuals with bipolar disorder, according to a study published in the February issue of CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics.

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Cancer Risk Higher in Children With Juvenile Arthritis

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are significantly more likely to develop cancer than children without the condition, although common treatments have no effect on risk, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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No Increase in Pediatric ER CT Scan Use from 2003 to 2010

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- From 2003 to 2010, there was no overall increase in computed tomography (CT) scan utilization in pediatric emergency departments (PEDs), and decreased trends for CT use are being seen when alternative nonradiation-based modalities are available, according to a study published Feb. 13 in Pediatrics.

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Insulin Defects Seen in Obese Teens With Normal Blood Glucose

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Obese teenagers in the upper range of normal glucose tolerance exhibit impairments in insulin sensitivity and secretion associated with development of impaired glucose tolerance, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in Diabetes.

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Prenatal Vitamin D Deficit Linked to Language Impairment

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal vitamin D insufficiency during pregnancy is linked to subsequent language impairment in offspring, according to a study published Feb. 13 in Pediatrics.

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Recommended Exceeds Actual Sleep Duration for Children

MONDAY, Feb. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Historical trends suggest that children's recommended and actual sleep durations are decreasing over time, with recommended sleep duration consistently greater than actual sleep duration, according to a study published online Feb. 13 in Pediatrics.

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Prenatal Stress May Affect Infant Immune System

FRIDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A woman's prenatal exposure to high stress and dust mite allergens may interact to affect the immune system of her offspring, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Allergy.

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Vitamin D Not Linked to Insulin Sensitivity in Teens

FRIDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D concentrations have no independent association with insulin sensitivity or β-cell function in black and white youth, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in Diabetes Care.

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Baby-Led Weaning Linked to Healthy Food Preferences

FRIDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Baby-led weaning though the use of finger foods, rather than continued spoon-feeding, promotes healthy food preferences in early childhood, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in BMJ Open.

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Heavy Soda Drinking Tied to Asthma, COPD

FRIDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Heavy consumption of soft drinks is linked to an increased risk of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study published in the February issue of Respirology.

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Brain Changes ID'd in Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

FRIDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- By late adolescence and early adulthood, brain volume and T2 relaxation time, a measure of tissue health, has declined in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with similarly-aged healthy peers, according to research published online Feb. 1 in Diabetes Care.

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No Long-Term Impairment From Prenatal Exposure to Chemo

FRIDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- General health outcomes and central nervous system, cardiac, and auditory morbidity are not affected by fetal exposure to chemotherapy over the long term, although premature infants exposed to chemotherapy in utero experience impaired cognitive development, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Robotic Surgery Repairs Urinary Tract Obstruction

FRIDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Robot-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty (RLP) is safe and efficacious for the repair of ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO), according to a study published in the February issue of Urology.

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Intracerebroventricular Opioid Infusion Feasible at Home

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of opioids is safe and effective for the treatment of nonresponsive pain in terminally-ill patients in home settings, according to a review published online Feb. 1 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Radiation Risks From Diagnostic Procedures Examined

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- National strategies should be developed for the use of evidence-based criteria and improved oversight of equipment to minimize radiation exposure for patients undergoing diagnostic procedures, according to a study published online Feb. 3 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

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Risk Factors Identified for Post NICU-Discharge Mortality

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Premature babies with extremely low birth weight (ELBW) are at increased risk of dying following discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) if they are African-American, lack health insurance, or had a long stay in the NICU, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Inflammation Link With Stroke Depends on Stroke Type

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated leukocyte counts are associated with a higher incidence of cerebral infarction and a lower incidence of intracerebral hemorrhage, according to a study published online Feb. 3 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Guidelines for VTE Prophylaxis in Nonsurgical Patients Issued

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- New evidence-based clinical practice guidelines have been issued for the prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in nonsurgical patients; the guidelines have been published in a supplement to the February issue of CHEST.

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Acute Myeloid Leukemia Risk Factors ID'd in Texas Adults

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Solvent exposure, smoking, and obesity are significant risk factors for de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in Texas, according to a study published online Feb. 1 in Cancer.

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Two-Way Flow of Data Best for Electronic Records, IIS

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Incentive payments to health care providers to encourage adoption of the electronic health record (EHR), instituted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), should encourage bidirectional sharing of information between EHR systems and state or regional immunization information systems (IIS), according to research published online Feb. 7 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Males With ACL Injury, Females Share Lateral Knee Geometry

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Female patients with and without anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, and male patients with ACL injury, share a common lateral tibiofemoral geometry, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Testosterone Patches Improve Low Sexual Desire Disorder

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence suggests that transdermal testosterone patches may relieve symptoms of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in postmenopausal women, according to a review published online Feb. 3 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Fasting Augments Chemo in Cancer Cells, Mouse Models

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Short cycles of starvation (fasting) sensitizes mammalian cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents, and may increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy against cancer cells and in mouse models, according to an experimental study published online Feb. 8 in Science Translational Medicine.

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About One-Third of U.S. Adults Receive Advice to Exercise

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. adults were more likely to receive advice to exercise or participate in physical activity in 2010 than in 2000, but such advice is currently only received by approximately one-third of all adults, according to a February data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Human Y Chromosome Linked to Coronary Artery Disease Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Human Y chromosome lineage is associated with coronary artery disease risk, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in The Lancet.

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Fen-Phen Derivative Likely Caused >1,000 Deaths in France

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Benfluorex (Mediator), a fenfluramine-derivative drug used in France for the treatment of high cholesterol in overweight patients with diabetes, is likely to have been responsible for thousands of hospitalizations and deaths over a 30-year period, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in Pharmacoepidemiology & Drug Safety.

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Cell Injection Therapy Safe for Achilles Tendinosis

THURSDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Injections of skin-derived fibroblasts are safe and reduce pain in unilateral Achilles tendinosis, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Prescription Shampoo Approved to Treat Head Lice

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Sklice Lotion, a prescription-strength shampoo to treat head lice, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for people 6 months and older, the French product maker Sanofi said.

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Tai Chi Training Improves Balance in Parkinson's Disease

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease, tai chi reduces balance impairments compared with resistance training or stretching, according to a study published in the Feb. 9 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Stimulation of Entorhinal Cortex Enhances Memory

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Focal electrical stimulation to the entorhinal cortex is associated with enhanced memory, according to a study published in the Feb. 9 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Antenatal Screening for Hypothyroidism Not Beneficial

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Screening for maternal hypothyroidism, and treatment of women with positive results, is not associated with improved IQ in offspring at age 3, according to a study published in the Feb. 9 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Chlorhexidine to Umbilical Cord Stump Reduces Newborn Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Cleaning the umbilical cord with chlorhexidine after birth significantly reduces newborn mortality and infection in rural Bangladesh and Pakistan, according to two studies published online Feb. 8 in The Lancet.

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Multicomponent Serogroup B Meningitis Shot Immunogenic

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The multicomponent serogroup B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) vaccine (4CMenB) is safe and immunogenic for infants when given alone or together with routine vaccinations, according to research published in the Feb. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Neuropsychiatric Events Have No Long-Term Impact in Lupus

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Neuropsychiatric manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are not associated with long-term disease activity, the accumulation of organ damage, or overall health-related quality of life, according to a study published online Jan. 30 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Casts for Fractures Linked to Development of Osteopenia

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- For adolescents with leg or ankle fractures, wearing a cast results in loss of bone mineral density in the hip or lower limb, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Caffeine Reduces Fibrosis Risk in Nonalcoholic Liver Disease

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Coffee caffeine consumption (CC) substantially reduces the risk of fibrosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), according to a study published in the February issue of Hepatology.

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Soy Isoflavones Don't Reduce Breast Epithelial Proliferation

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Mixed soy isoflavone supplements given over a six-month period show no significant effect in reducing the proliferation of breast cancer epithelial cells in healthy women, according to a study published in the February issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

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Epilepsy Surgery Improves Long-Term Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Epilepsy surgery is a beneficial procedure, resulting in sustained quality of life and better long-term seizure control for patients, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in Epilepsia.

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No Increase in Intussusception After RV5 Rotavirus Vaccine

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of intussusception is not increased in infants aged 4 to 34 weeks who receive the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5) compared with infants who do not receive the vaccine, according to research published in the Feb. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Heart Failure Tied to Increased Osteoporotic Fracture Risk

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with heart failure have an increased risk of major osteoporotic fractures, independent of traditional risk factors and bone mineral density (BMD), according to a study published online Jan. 18 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Cognitive Impairment Criteria Impact Alzheimer's Diagnosis

TUESDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Using revised criteria for mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the vast majority of patients with very mild or mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) would be reclassified as having MCI, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Age Affects Risk of Death in Women With Breast Cancer

TUESDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Among postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, increasing age is associated with a higher risk of death from breast cancer, according to a study published in the Feb. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cefpodoxime Not Recommended for Acute, Uncomplicated Cystitis

TUESDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Cefpodoxime should not be used as a first-line fluoroquinolone-sparing antimicrobial for acute uncomplicated cystitis, according to a study published in the Feb. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Reduced Caloric Nourishment Doesn't Reduce Ventilator Use

TUESDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Providing lower amounts of nutritional support does not reduce ventilator-free days, risk of death at 60 days, or infectious complications for critically ill patients with acute lung injury compared to providing full caloric nourishment, according to a study published online Feb. 5 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Breast Cancer Prevention Drug Linked to Bone Loss

TUESDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women receiving the aromatase inhibitor exemestane to prevent breast cancer are more likely to have bone loss, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Patients Desire Involvement in Planning Breast CA Treatment

TUESDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients with early-stage breast cancer have a desire for decisional control, which increases postconsultation, and patients who are involved in decisions have better decision-related outcomes, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Continuous Exercise in Hypoxia Beneficial in Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D), continuous moderate-intensity exercise in hypoxia provides the greatest improvements in acute and moderate-term glucose control, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Subcortical Gray Matter Changes Seen in RA Patients

TUESDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with healthy control subjects, patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have reduced intracranial volumes and structural changes in the subcortical gray matter, but do not have localized cortical gray matter atrophy, according to research published in the February issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Three 'Targeted' Cancer Drugs Up Risk of Fatal Adverse Events

TUESDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The use of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) to treat cancer is associated with an increased risk of fatal adverse events (FAEs) but there is no difference in rates of FAEs between the different VEGFR TKIs or tumor types, according to a meta-analysis published online Feb. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Fructose Stimulates Insulin Via Sweet Taste Receptors

TUESDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Fructose binds to sweet taste receptors (TRs) on beta cells, activating a signaling pathway that potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, according to an experimental study published online Feb. 6 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Polyethylene Glycol Repairs Severed Nerves in Rats

TUESDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Polyethylene glycol (PEG) may be useful for repairing severed nerves, according to two experimental studies published online Feb. 3 in the Journal of Neuroscience Research.

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New Guidelines Recommend Metformin in Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar cannot be controlled by lifestyle modifications such as diet and exercise, metformin monotherapy should be prescribed initially, according to new guidelines from the American College of Physicians (ACP) published in the Feb. 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Fluoxetine, Venlafaxine Tied to Drop in Adult Suicide Behaviors

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with the antidepressants fluoxetine hydrochloride and venlafaxine hydrochloride is associated with a reduction in suicidal thoughts and behavior in adult and geriatric patients and has no impact on such thoughts or behavior in youths, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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DRAGON Score Helps Predict Functional Outcomes in Stroke

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- A new scoring method can aid clinicians in predicting functional outcomes for patients with ischemic stroke receiving intravenous (IV) alteplase, according to a study published in the Feb. 7 issue of Neurology.

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Change in Fitness or Fatness Impacts Cardio Risk Factors

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Maintaining or improving fitness and preventing fat gain are both associated with a lower likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in healthy adults, according to a study published in the Feb. 14 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Teen Exposure to Secondhand Smoke in Cars Declines

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure in cars has significantly declined among middle school and high school students over the last decade, but approximately a quarter of nonsmoking students are still exposed, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Pediatrics.

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RA Drug Trial Funding Source Not Linked to Outcome

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) drug therapy randomized controlled trials (RCTs) funded by industry are not more likely to result in a positive outcome, according to research published online Jan. 24 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Noroviruses Are Leading Cause of Hospital Infections

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Norovirus outbreaks are the leading cause of infection outbreaks in hospitals, particularly in the non-acute care setting, and often lead to unit closure, according to an article published in the February issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Exercise Test May Predict Post-Liver Transplant Survival

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Anaerobic threshold (AT), as determined by submaximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), may have value in predicting 90-day post-transplant survival for patients undergoing liver transplantation, according to a study published in the February issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Weight Loss Impacts Leg Muscle, Strength in Knee OA

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, a 16-week low-energy diet program results in independent losses of leg muscle tissue and strength, and is accompanied by improvements in body mass-normalized muscle strength, according to research published in the February issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Startle Response Up in Early-Onset Alcohol Dependence

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Early-onset alcohol-dependent patients have increased acoustic startle responses compared with late-onset alcohol-dependent patients or healthy controls, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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More Than 4,500 Children Hospitalized for Abuse in 2006

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- More than 4,500 children were hospitalized due to serious physical abuse in 2006, and 300 of these children died in the hospital due to physical abuse, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Pediatrics.

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Pediatric Stem Cell Transplant Recipients Are Resilient

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric patients undergoing stem cell transplantation (SCT) have a positive overall adjustment and health-related quality of life (HRQL), according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Pediatrics.

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Social Exclusion Impacts Child Physical Activity Behaviors

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- For children, simulated ostracism is associated with reduced participation in physical activity, according to a study published online Feb. 6 in Pediatrics.

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Massage Reduces Inflammation Following Hard Exercise

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Massage therapy following strenuous exercise reduces inflammation and promotes the growth of new mitochondria in skeletal muscle, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Mechanism for Metabolic Effects of Resveratrol Elucidated

MONDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- By inhibiting phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 in skeletal muscle, resveratrol triggers a series of intracellular events, including indirect activation of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1), according to an experimental study published in the Feb. 3 issue of Cell.

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Many Self-Harming Youth Get Inadequate Mental Health Care

FRIDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Many adolescents who are treated in emergency departments for deliberately harming themselves do not receive adequate mental health assessments or follow-up community care, according to research published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

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Smoking Increases Progression Risk in Barrett's Esophagus

FRIDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Barrett's esophagus who currently smoke have twice the risk of developing esophageal cancer compared with never smokers, according to a study published in the February issue of Gastroenterology.

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High Alcohol Intake, Family History Impact Colon CA Risk

FRIDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who consume 30 g alcohol or more per day have a significantly elevated risk of colon cancer, especially those with a family history of colorectal cancer, according to a study published in the February issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Patients With IBD Experience More Travel-Related Illness

FRIDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) experience more travel-related illness when visiting industrialized, but not developing, countries than healthy individuals, according to research published in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Increased ADHD Rates in Children Exposed to Anesthesia

FRIDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Repeated exposure to general anesthesia before age 2 years is associated with increased risk for later development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published in the February issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Ghrelin Stimulates Food Intake During Cisplatin-Based Chemo

THURSDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Administration of synthetic ghrelin during chemotherapy improves food intake and appetite in patients with esophageal cancer, while minimizing gastrointestinal disorders, according to a study published online Jan. 26 in Cancer.

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Direct to Consumer Statin Web Sites of Poor Quality

THURSDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Most Web sites advertising statins directly to consumers contain poor levels of information relevant to safe use of the medicine and side effects, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety.

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National Suicide Guidelines Help Cut Suicide Rates

THURSDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Local implementation of national suicide recommendations reduces suicide rates, particularly in deprived catchment areas, according to a study published online Feb. 2 in The Lancet.

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Heart Failure Linked to Loss of Cerebral Gray Matter

THURSDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure is associated with loss of gray matter (GM) in the brain and worse cognitive function, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in the European Heart Journal.

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β-Amyloid Deposition Seen in Some Healthy Older Adults

THURSDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition is seen in some healthy older adults and is associated with worse cognitive performance, according to a study published online Feb. 1 in Neurology.

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Occasional Hard Drug Use in Mid-Life Hikes Mortality Risks

THURSDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The occasional use of hard drugs in middle age is linked to significantly increased risk of all-cause mortality, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Geographic Pattern of Lyme Disease Mapped in Eastern U.S.

THURSDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Two Lyme disease risk foci have been identified in the Northeast and upper Midwest of the United States, according to a study published in the February issue of The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

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Live Liver Donation Doesn't Impact Long-Term Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of early death for live liver donors is 1.7 per 1,000 donors, and long-term mortality is similar to that of healthy individuals, according to a study published in the February issue of Gastroenterology.

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No Improvement in C-Peptide Levels With GAD-Alum

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Treating children with type 1 diabetes with the 65-kD isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) formulated with alum (GAD-alum) does not significantly change levels of stimulated serum C-peptide during 15 months of follow-up, according to a study published in the Feb. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Oral Ulipristal Acetate Controls Uterine Fibroid Bleeding

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- For women with symptomatic fibroids, a daily dose of 5 or 10 mg oral ulipristal acetate is efficacious for controlling uterine bleeding before surgery, compared with placebo or leuprolide acetate, according to two studies published in the Feb. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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AAP: Childhood Vaccination Schedules Approved for 2012

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The 2012 recommended childhood and adolescent vaccination schedules have been approved, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published in the February issue of Pediatrics.

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Exercise Aids Health, Well-Being of Cancer Survivors

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise is associated with improvements in physical functions and quality of life in patients who have completed cancer treatment, according to a meta-analysis published online Jan. 31 in BMJ.

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Proton Pump Inhibitor Use Ups Hip Fracture Risk for Women

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women are at a 35 percent increased risk of hip fractures if they regularly use proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), and that risk increases to more than 50 percent among women with a history of smoking, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in BMJ.

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Repeat Flexible Sigmoidoscopy Increases Detection of CRC

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Repeated screening by flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSG) increases the detection of colorectal cancer or advanced adenoma in women and men, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Decision Support Tools Help Optimize Acute PE Detection

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Implementing evidence-based clinical decision support (CDS) significantly improves the efficiency of computed tomographic (CT) angiography use to detect acute pulmonary embolism (PE) for patients presenting to an emergency department, according to a study published in the February issue of Radiology.

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Insulin Secretion Impaired in the Insulin-Resistant

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes have impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion after exposure to insulin compared with healthy individuals, according to a study published in the February issue of Diabetes.

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