January 2009 Briefing - Nursing

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for January 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Motility Studies Useful in Neonatal Dysphagia

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In neonatal dysphagia, pharyngoesophageal motility studies combined with clinical observations during evaluation can play a useful role in the development of well-structured multidisciplinary feeding strategies, researchers report in the February issue of the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition.

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US Outpatient Surgeries Increasingly Common

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Outpatient surgery visits are rising in the United States, with the number increasing from 20.8 million in 1996 to 34.7 million in 2006. They now account for nearly two-thirds of all surgery visits compared to about half of all surgery visits in 1996, according to a report issued Jan. 28 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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FX06 Cuts Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Injury

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention to treat acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), using intravenous FX06, a fibrin-derived naturally occurring peptide, significantly reduces the necrotic core zone, but does not change scar size or troponin I levels, according to study findings published online Jan. 28 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Bisphenol A Levels Do Not Decrease with Fasting

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphenol A, an industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins and polyvinyl chloride plastic, may accumulate in body tissue or be ingested via substantial non-food sources, according to study findings published online Jan. 28 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Long-Term Outcomes Favorable in Kidney Donors

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney donors are likely to enjoy excellent long-term health outcomes, with rates of survival, albuminuria and hypertension similar to those of non-donors, a preserved glomerular filtration rate, and no increased risk of end-stage renal disease, according to study findings published in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Clopidogrel/Proton Pump Inhibitor Combo Questioned

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Heart attack patients who take both clopidogrel and a proton pump inhibitor other than pantoprazole have an increased risk of reinfarction and may lose the beneficial effects of clopidogrel, according to research published online Jan. 28 in CMAJ, the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

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Low Mammogram Rates Among Pediatric Cancer Survivors

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Despite recommended guidelines, a number of women who received chest radiation for a childhood cancer have not had mammography screening for breast cancer in the previous two years, according to the results of a study published in the Jan. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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AHA Supports Omega-6 for Possible Heart Protection

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association recommends that at least 5 to 10 percent of individuals' calories should come from omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, according to a science advisory published online Jan. 26 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Clinical Information Technology Leads to Safer Hospitals

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that make use of clinical information technology to automate notes, records, order entry and clinical decision support have lower mortality rates, fewer complications and also save money, according to a report published in the Jan. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Prolonged Use of Loop Diuretics May Raise Fracture Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women who use loop diuretics are at increased risk of fractures, according to a report published in the Jan. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Meditation Practice Linked to Less Pain Sensitivity

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Experience in Zen meditation is associated with reduced pain sensitivity, a finding supporting the value of mindfulness-based meditation, according to research published in the January issue of Psychosomatic Medicine.

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Alcohol-Use Disorders Are Common, But Treatable

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- About one-quarter of individuals with alcohol-use disorders will seek help for their problems, and health care providers should routinely screen for alcohol dependence or abuse, according to a seminar published online Jan. 26 in The Lancet.

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More Recess Time Leads to Better Classroom Behavior

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Elementary school-age students who receive at least one daily recess period of 15 minutes or more are likely to show better behavior in the classroom, according to study findings published in the February issue of Pediatrics.

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Acute Geriatric Units Improve Elderly Care

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients hospitalized with acute medical disorders are more likely to live at home after discharge if they are treated in acute geriatric wards rather than conventional hospital care, according to research published online Jan. 22 in BMJ.

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Abuse of Dementia Patients by Carers Is Common

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- It is common for people with dementia to be abused by family carers, most often with verbal abuse, although frequent and physical abuse seems to be rare, according to the results of a study published online Jan. 22 in BMJ.

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Declaration on Medics' Role in Torture Needs Updating

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the fact that the Declaration of Tokyo condemns the participation of medical personnel in torture and inhumane treatment, there are key areas in which the declaration should be strengthened, according to an article published in the Jan. 24 issue of The Lancet.

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Ethical HIV Testing in Poor Countries Needed

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Testing a patient's blood without their consent for HIV is important for HIV surveillance, but needs to be carefully implemented in developing countries to ensure that testing is done ethically, according to an article published online Jan. 20 in PLoS Medicine.

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Occupational Exposures Increase Nurses' Asthma Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses who are exposed to occupational cleaning products and disinfectants may have an increased risk of new-onset asthma, according to a report published online Jan. 22 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Baby with Seizures Had Rickets and Anemia

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A 9-month-old baby who presented with seizures and a bulging fontanelle was diagnosed as having rickets due to vitamin D deficiency, iron deficiency anemia and severe protein-calorie malnutrition, according to a case report published in the Jan. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Peanut Butter Crackers, Dog Snacks Among Recalled Items

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The list of recalled products resulting from the recent Salmonella typhimurium outbreak has grown, and officials believe a processing plant in Blakely, Ga., may be the source of the outbreak, according to officials speaking at a teleconference conducted Jan. 21 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Food Supplementation Reduces Wasting in African Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Short-term food supplementation reduces wasting among children in Niger, but does not reduce the death rate, researchers report in the Jan. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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In-Home Intervention Can Help Postpartum Moms

FRIDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Specially trained "health visitors" offering in-home psychological interventions to new mothers were associated with reduced symptoms of depression, according to research published online Jan. 15 in BMJ.

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Telephone Follow-Up Effective in Breast Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Among women treated for breast cancer who have a low-to-moderate risk of recurrence, telephone follow-up is a well-received and convenient intervention with no associated physical or psychological drawbacks, according to research published online Jan. 14 in BMJ.

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Post-G8 Work Focuses on Strengthening Health Systems

THURSDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In an atmosphere that emphasizes the strengthening of health systems rather than disease-specific approaches, some efforts growing out of the 2008 G8 summit in Toyako, Japan, have focused on health work force, health finance and health information, according to a policy review published online Jan. 15 in The Lancet.

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Surgical Checklist Slashes Complications, Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Using a 19-item checklist can significantly reduce the rates of death and complications as a result of surgery, according to a report published online Jan. 14 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Labor Patterns Differ for Vaginal and Caesarean Delivery

FRIDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The direction and timing of contractions during labor are different for vaginal and Caesarean deliveries, according to study findings published in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Health Care Another Victim of Gaza Blockade

FRIDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The widespread erosion of human rights in the Palestinian West Bank and Gaza strip is denying Palestinians access to basic health care and preventing medical schools from functioning properly, according to correspondence published online Jan. 9 in The Lancet.

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Night-Shift Nurses at Higher Risk of Early Preterm Birth

THURSDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses who work part-time may be at lower risk of preterm birth, while those who work night shifts are at higher risk of early, but not late, preterm birth, according to research published in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Hundreds Acquired Hepatitis B, C in US Health Care Settings

TUESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- More than 400 people were found to have acquired hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) in non-hospital health care settings since 1998 in the United States, with more than 60,000 estimated to have been at risk during these outbreaks, according to research published in the Jan. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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