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July 2008 Briefing - Nursing

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for July 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Device May Decrease Musculoskeletal Procedure Pain

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- A reciprocating procedure device decreases patient's pain during musculoskeletal procedures, improves outcomes and may decrease needlestick injuries to health care workers, according to an article published in the July issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Nurses Approach Issue of ER Overcrowding

WEDNESDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Staff participation, such as deciding on the criteria for the closure of a hospital emergency department waiting room, is an effective way to conduct research into operational change, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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FDA Approves First Generic Divalproex Sodium

WEDNESDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved generic versions of Depakote delayed-release tablets (divalproex sodium) for the first time, according to a press release issued by the FDA this week.

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Use of Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Endocarditis Discouraged

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotic prophylaxis should no longer routinely be given to prevent infective endocarditis in patients undergoing dental and other medical procedures, according to updated guidelines published online July 28 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The guidelines were jointly developed by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.

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Fatal Medication Errors Surge Since 1983

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- The death rate due to fatal medication errors rose sharply between 1983 and 2004, with particularly steep increases in incidents in the home and deaths from a combination of medications and alcohol or street drugs, according to research published in the July 28 Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Taser Injuries Require Preparation in ERs

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Given law enforcement officers' growing use of Tasers and accumulating accounts of deaths from the electroshock devices, emergency nurses and other care providers need to be prepared to handle Taser-related injuries, according to a paper in the August Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Medical Errors Have Impact After Hospital Discharge

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Medical errors affect patients in the months after hospital discharge as well as during their hospital stays, leading to excess costs, deaths and hospital readmissions, according to a study published online July 25 in Health Services Research.

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Shifts in Focus Could Reduce Tuberculosis

TUESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Focusing on some foreign-born individuals with latent tuberculosis infection may represent one of the more effective options for improving TB control in this group in the United States, and a framework of strategic activities in HIV care programs could address pressing global concerns related to TB, according to two studies in the July 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Cain
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Abstract - Havlir
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Anesthetic Accidents More Common in Afternoon

MONDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Anesthetic adverse events are more common in surgeries performed after 4 p.m., and are exacerbated by the shortage of anesthesia care providers, which has increased working hours and therefore fatigue, according to an article published in the July issue of the AORN Journal.

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Implicit Racial Bias Exists, But Doesn't Affect Treatment

FRIDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Implicit racial bias is present in pediatricians, but is not associated with differences in treatment decisions, according to an article published in the July issue of Medical Care.

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Report Finds U.S. Health System Lagging Further Behind

FRIDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health system is operating poorly compared to its potential, with America falling further behind other nations that are leading on performance indicators, according to a report released by The Commonwealth Fund on July 17.

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Intraoperative Radiographs Essential for Avoiding Errors

FRIDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Intraoperative radiographs and other precautions are critical for preventing incorrect-site surgery among neurosurgeons, according to three letters to the editor published in the July issue of the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, in response to a previous report.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required) - Ammerman
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required) - Sahjpaul
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required) - Irace

Violent Attacks Becoming Less Frequent But More Serious

FRIDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- In contrast to the strong media, public and government reaction to a spate of recent knife killings in the United Kingdom, violent crime has decreased in frequency from 2000 to 2007, with knife crimes remaining stable at approximately 7 percent of the total. However, hospital admissions for violent crime have increased, pointing to more serious injuries sustained as a result of violent crime, according to an editorial published online July 16 in BMJ.

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Exception Reporting Improves Pay-for-Performance Benefits

THURSDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Pay-for-performance programs benefit from use of exclusion reporting, whereby certain patients are excluded from quality calculations, and the practice of excluding patients to disguise missed targets, known as gaming, is rare, according to study findings published in the July 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Fall Prevention Program Efficacious and Cost-Effective

WEDNESDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- A multidisciplinary educational program geared towards clinicians to help them prevent falls in their elderly patients resulted in fewer serious fall-related injuries in patients aged 70 and older, according to an article published in the July 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Alterations Often Observed with Medical Interpreters

WEDNESDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Interpreters who translate medical information between clinicians and the families of patients with limited English proficiency have about a 50 percent chance of altering the meaning, with potentially negative consequences, according to a report in the July issue of Chest.

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Revised Mental Exam Cut Score May Benefit Well-Educated

TUESDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- A cut score of 27 on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) may be more useful in identifying dementia in older patients with a college education than the traditional cut score of 24, according to research published in the July issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Shoulder Dystocia Training Improves Neonatal Outcomes

MONDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- The introduction of shoulder dystocia training for all hospital maternity staff can significantly improve management of the complication as well as neonatal outcomes, according to research published in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Low Job Satisfaction Seen Among Obstetrician-Gynecologists

MONDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- The workforce of obstetrician-gynecologists in the United States is facing a future shortage, exacerbated by low levels of job satisfaction, researchers report in the July issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Health Cash Incentives for Poor People Debated

WEDNESDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Should disadvantaged people be paid to take care of their health? That's the question of a "Head to Head" debate published online July 8 in BMJ.

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Aerobic Training Reverses Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors

TUESDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients randomized to aerobic interval training versus an equivalent amount of continuous moderate exercise experienced greater improvements in aerobic capacity and reversed more risk factors of the metabolic syndrome, according to an article published online July 7 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. In a related study, full scale implementation of 11 prevention measures prevented up to two-thirds of myocardial infarctions and one-third of strokes.

Abstract - Tjonna
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Abstract - Kahn
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Intervention Benefits Depressed Cancer Patients

FRIDAY, July 4 (HealthDay News) -- A nurse-delivered intervention -- Depression Care for People with Cancer -- may be a beneficial and cost-effective strategy for managing major depressive disorder in patients with cancer and other medical disorders, according to an article published in the July 5 issue of The Lancet.

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Bar-Coded Medication System Has Shortcomings

THURSDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Bar-coded medication systems, used to reduce administration-stage medication errors, are circumvented using various methods for over 10 percent of charted medications, according to study findings published in the July/August issue of the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

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Multiple Vaccines for Iraq-Bound U.K. Forces Not Harmful

TUESDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- British armed forces personnel did not suffer any adverse health effects from the multiple vaccinations they were given prior to deployment, according to research published online June 30 in BMJ.

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Physician's Briefing