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June 2010 Briefing - Nursing

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for June 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Cardio Exercise Safe, Beneficial in Rheumatoid Arthritis

WEDNESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiorespiratory aerobic exercise is safe for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and leads to improved function and quality of life, though its effect is small, according to a meta-analysis published in the July issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Expectant, New Moms Uninformed on Preterm Birth

WEDNESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Most new or expectant moms have not discussed the possibility of preterm birth with their health care providers, despite the fact that one in eight babies born every year is preterm, according to the results of a survey conducted by the March of Dimes and BabyCenter.

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Many Breast Cancer Patients Don't Adhere to Therapy

WEDNESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Only half of hormone-sensitive stage I to III breast cancer patients prescribed adjuvant hormonal therapy adhere to that therapy for the full duration at the optimal schedule, and younger women in particular are at high risk of non-adherence, according to a study published online June 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Children's Language Skills Tied to Later Psychosocial Effects

WEDNESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Early receptive language skills have a significant association with adult mental health and psychosocial adjustment, according to a study published online June 29 in Pediatrics.

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Adult Obesity Rate Increases in 28 States

WEDNESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- In the past year, the adult obesity rate increased in 28 states, and there are marked differences in obesity rates by region, race, and income, according to a report published June 29 by the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

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Family-Centered Rounds Are Popular, Well-Perceived

WEDNESDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Family-centered rounds (FCRs) are the most common pediatric hospital rounding method, lead to better communication, and do not extend the duration of rounding time, according to research published online June 29 in Pediatrics.

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MMRV Vaccine Ups Fever and Seizure Risk

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Measles-mumps-rubella-varicella (MMRV) vaccination is associated with an increased risk of fever and seizure in young children, above that already associated with measles-containing vaccines, according to research published online June 29 in Pediatrics, confirming preliminary evidence from a previous study.

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Mammograms for Poor Insured Rise With Stepwise Reminders

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- A stepwise screening mammogram reminder program significantly increases the likelihood that an insured, very low-income woman will obtain a mammogram, according to research published online June 29 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Maternal Smoking May Impact Child's Mental Health

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal smoking may have an intrauterine effect on child conduct and externalizing problems, and there may be a biologically mediated association between paternal smoking and increased childhood body mass index (BMI), according to two studies published online June 29 in Pediatrics.

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Collegial Atmosphere Promotes Effective Child Protection Team

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital-based child protection teams (CPT) are most effective when working within a collegial, multidisciplinary environment, according to research published online June 29 in Pediatrics.

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Diagnostic Adverse Events Usually Due to Human Failure

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Diagnostic adverse events (DAEs) are most often caused by human error, and their consequences are more severe than those of other types of adverse events, according to research published in the June 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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14 Percent of Cancer Survivors Live With Minor Children

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Nationwide, an estimated 1.58 million cancer survivors live with their minor children, representing a large number of families who confront special challenges and may need additional support, according to research published online June 28 in Cancer.

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End-of-Life Hospital Care Has Room for Improvement

TUESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- In U.S. hospitals, the care of patients at end of life nearly always includes close attention to pain management and efforts to ease breathing, but there are other areas of care that need improvement, according to research published in the June 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Doctors Agree Malpractice Fears Drive Overuse of Tests

MONDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- A large majority of physicians agree that the practice of defensive medicine -- stemming from malpractice concerns -- is responsible for an overuse of medical tests and procedures, according to a research letter in the June 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Two Studies Demonstrate Cardiac Risks of Rosiglitazone

MONDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- New evidence suggests that rosiglitazone is associated with an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, according to two studies published online June 28 in the Journal of the American Medical Association and the Archives of Internal Medicine. The studies were released online ahead of publication because of their relevance to an upcoming U.S. Food and Drug Administration meeting intended to review the safety of rosiglitazone.

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Teen Girls More Likely to View Drug, Alcohol Use Positively

MONDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- Teenage girls are more likely than their male counterparts to perceive potential benefits -- including "self-medicating" benefits -- from drug and alcohol use, according to survey data released by the Partnership for a Drug-Free America and the MetLife Foundation.

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Venous Thromboembolism Risk Factors Vary by Race

MONDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- Black Americans with venous thromboembolism (VTE) are less likely to have commonly recognized transient risk factors for the condition, are more likely to have cardiovascular disease risk factors, and are more likely to progress to pulmonary embolism than are white Americans, according to research published in the July issue of the American Journal of Hematology.

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Digoxin May Increase Mortality Risk in Hemodialysis Patients

FRIDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Digoxin use by patients on hemodialysis is linked to increased mortality, particularly in patients who have low pre-dialysis potassium concentrations, according to research published online June 24 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Updated Recommendations for Endometriosis Released

FRIDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Women who suffer from endometriosis-related pain should be treated first with conservative, non-surgical approaches and then with more invasive options if pain does not resolve, and hysterectomy only as a last resort, according to a practice bulletin issued by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and published in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Recent Low Back Pain Guidelines Offer Similar Advice

FRIDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Recent clinical practice guidelines offer similar recommendations for assessing and managing low back pain, and clinicians can improve patient care by adopting these recommendations, according to a review published in the June issue of The Spine Journal.

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Moldy Homes Linked to Higher Risk of Severe Asthma Attacks

FRIDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- High mold exposure in the home may lead to an increased risk of severe asthma attacks among children with variants in the chitinase gene CHIT1, according to research published online June 10 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Panel Urges Two Yearly Preventive Visits for Teens

FRIDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent girls may require two "well-child" visits annually -- one general preventive visit and one dedicated to reproductive health, and both visits should be covered by health insurance, according a committee opinion of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) published in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Only 1 in 10 Meets '05 Sodium Intake Recommendations

THURSDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Only one in 10 American adults adheres to the 2005 recommendation for daily sodium intake, according to a report published in the June 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Rate of HIV Testing Up, New AIDS Cases Down in D.C.

THURSDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- In Washington, D.C., where the HIV case rate is nearly 10 times the U.S. rate, the proportion of the population tested for HIV has increased and the rate of newly diagnosed AIDS cases has decreased in recent years, according to a report published in the June 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Phone Reminders Up Colorectal Cancer Screening Rate

THURSDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- An automated telephone intervention appears to increase the completion of fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) for colorectal cancer screening, according to a study published in the July issue of Medical Care.

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Diabetes May Complicate COPD Hospital Admissions

THURSDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Patients admitted to the hospital with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) who have comorbid diabetes mellitus (DM) have trends toward longer hospital length of stay and an increased risk of death compared with those without DM, according to research published online June 4 in Respirology.

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Computerized Decision Support Boosts Postpartum Vaccination

THURSDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- A computer-based clinical decision-support algorithm can dramatically increase rates of tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccination of postpartum women, according to a study in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Underinsured African-Americans With Breast Cancer Fare Worse

THURSDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Underinsured African-American patients are more likely to experience poorer breast cancer-specific survival than their non-Hispanic white counterparts, though the effect of race on survival is not statistically significant after adjustment for sociodemographic and clinical factors, according to research published online June 23 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Test Combination Predicts Fall Risk in Parkinson's Disease

WEDNESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of tests on disease-specific and mobility- and balance-related measures can accurately predict which Parkinson's disease patients are more likely to fall, according to a study published online June 23 in Neurology.

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U.S. Ranks Last in International Health Care Survey

WEDNESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Of seven wealthy countries, the United States ranks last in health care, according to the 2010 edition of "Mirror, Mirror on the Wall," a report on the quality of international care released June 23 by The Commonwealth Fund.

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New 2009 H1N1 Influenza Virus Test Authorized by FDA

WEDNESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has authorized a new test that uses molecular biology techniques to diagnose 2009 H1N1 influenza virus infection in humans.

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Health Professionals Often Do Little to Help Smokers Quit

WEDNESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Many health care professionals ask patients about smoking and advise them to quit but do not follow guidelines to help patients actually give up the habit, according to research published online May 27 in Nicotine & Tobacco Research.

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C-Section Risk Found High for First-Time Moms Induced at Term

WEDNESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Nulliparous women who undergo induced labor at term have double the risk of requiring cesarean delivery, according to a study in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Findings Suggest Harmful Effects From MP3 Players

WEDNESDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Temporary changes in hearing sensitivity associated with MP3 players suggest that the devices could have potentially harmful effects, according to research published in the June issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Racial Disparities in Sepsis Explained by Two Factors

TUESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Racial differences in sepsis rates are due to higher infection rates as well as a higher risk of organ dysfunction among black patients compared with white patients, according to research published in the June 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Weight Control Important for Diabetes Risk in Later Years

TUESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, body fat and weight gain after the age of 50 are associated with a higher risk of diabetes, according to research published in the June 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Surgical Infection-Prevention Program Has Mixed Results

TUESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) infection-prevention measures is associated with a decreased risk of postoperative infections only when the measures are analyzed as a composite score instead of individually, according to research published in the June 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Panel Says Ob-Gyn Hospitalist Trend Aids Patients, Doctors

TUESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- The increasing number of obstetrician-gynecologist hospitalists has the potential to improve patient safety, streamline patient care, and improve the lifestyle of currently practicing Ob-Gyns, according to a committee opinion of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) published in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Spinal Surgical Site Infections Usually S. Aureus

TUESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Both deep and superficial surgical site infections (SSIs) after spinal surgery are usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus; successful treatment of deep infections is possible with single stage debridement and intravenous antibiotics, and superficial infections can effectively be treated with local wound care and oral antibiotic therapy, according to research published in the June 1 issue of Spine.

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Some Moist Toilet Paper Can Cause Severe Reaction

TUESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- A preservative used in moist toilet paper can cause a severe allergic reaction in some people, as demonstrated by four case reports published online June 21 in the Archives of Dermatology.

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Surgical Residents Critical of Work-Hour Restrictions

MONDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- The 50-hour workweek limitation for residents that has been adopted in Switzerland may have improved residents' quality of life, but at a cost to their surgical training and patient care, according to research published in the June issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Cardiology Practices With APNs, PAs Meet Guidelines

MONDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiology practices with at least two advanced practice nurses (APNs) or physician assistants (PAs) on staff deliver most guideline-recommended heart failure outpatient therapies as well as practices with no APNs or PAs, and deliver some therapies and services better, according to a study in the June 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Breast-Feeding for Six Months Best for Infection Prevention

MONDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Exclusive breast-feeding until age 6 months is slightly more protective against infectious diseases than exclusive breast-feeding for four months and partially thereafter, according to research published online June 21 in Pediatrics.

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PCBs Linked to Reduced Response to Vaccinations

MONDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) early in life may reduce the effectiveness of childhood vaccinations and impair immune-system responses to infection, according to research published online June 20 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Brain Hemorrhage Diagnosis Delay Rare in Children

MONDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- In children with uncomplicated minor head injuries, delayed diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage is rare, according to research published online June 21 in Pediatrics.

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Most Pediatricians Admit to 1-2 Diagnostic Errors Per Month

MONDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Most pediatricians report making at least one to two diagnostic errors per month, and patient harm resulting from these errors is not uncommon, according to research published online June 21 in Pediatrics.

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High Tea Consumption Linked to Lower CHD Mortality Risk

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate coffee drinkers and moderate to heavy tea drinkers appear to experience less risk of heart disease and, in the case of tea drinkers, lower heart disease-related mortality, according to research published online June 18 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

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Interest by Physicians Can Play Role in Medication Adherence

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Patients whose doctors actively review their medication use and prescribing information are more likely to use inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) for asthma control as prescribed, according to research published online May 31 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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ER Visits for Prescription Drug Misuse Climbing

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- From 2004 to 2008, emergency department visits involving the non-medical use of prescription drugs increased substantially in the United States, according to research published in the June 18 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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10 Risk Factors Associated With Most of Stroke Risk

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Worldwide, 10 risk factors are associated with 90 percent of the risk for stroke, suggesting that interventions targeting these particular factors could greatly reduce the stroke burden, according to a study published online June 18 in The Lancet.

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Sites Contain Graphic Material to Promote Eating Disorders

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Pro-eating disorder Web sites are easy to access and contain content that encourages and motivates users to continue their efforts with anorexia and bulimia, though many include recovery-oriented messages as well, according to research published online June 17 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Receipt of Kidney Care Less Likely in Black Communities

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Even when their kidney function is clearly declining, people living in communities with a high percentage of black residents are less likely to receive kidney care before they start dialysis than those living elsewhere, regardless of race, according to research published online June 17 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Lack of Fitness, Inactivity Linked to Walking Falls

FRIDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Poor physical fitness and physical inactivity may increase the risk of falls while walking, particularly in men, according to research published in the July issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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EMR Program Benefits More Modest Than Expected

THURSDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- The limited introduction of a central repository for electronic summary care records (SCRs) in England has had a subtle but positive effect on health care delivery, but national implementation will be a complicated process, according to research published June 16 in BMJ.

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Celecoxib Linked to Lower Rate of Gastrointestinal Events

THURSDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- The cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) celecoxib is associated with a lower risk of gastrointestinal adverse events than the NSAID diclofenac plus the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) omeprazole in patients with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, according to a study published online June 17 in The Lancet.

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Improved Liability Protection Could Up Use of School Grounds

THURSDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- The improvement of liability protection could open public school facilities for recreational activity to the benefit of the larger community, according to a review published in the July issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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New Method Gives Better Local Start Date for RSV Prophylaxis

THURSDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Using five years of local laboratory surveillance data to predict likely respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) outbreak timing is a viable method for recommending optimal immunoprophylaxis dates, according to research published online June 14 in Pediatrics.

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Prenatal Smoking Linked to Pregnancy, Infant Risks

THURSDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal smoking continues to be a substantial contributor to infant death in the United States, according to research published in the July issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Psychological Variables Predict Disability From Back Pain

THURSDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term disability from low back pain (LBP) may be prevented by targeting interventions to several psychological variables, according to research published in the June 1 issue of Spine.

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Functional Dyspepsia Tied to Higher Costs for Employees

THURSDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with functional dyspepsia are absent from work more often and incur higher direct and indirect medical costs than employees without the condition, according to research published in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Antiretroviral Regimens Reduce Mom-Baby HIV Transmission

WEDNESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Various antiretroviral treatment options for lactating mothers and breast-feeding infants appear to reduce mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), according to two studies in the June 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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More Older Adults Being Treated for Substance Abuse

WEDNESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of Americans 50 years of age or older being treated for abuse of illicit substances substantially increased from 1992 to 2008, according to a study sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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Mediterranean Diet Linked to Better Cardiac Function

WEDNESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- The closer a person conforms to a Mediterranean diet, the greater the likelihood of higher heart rate variability (HRV), indicating better cardiac autonomic function and lower risk for coronary artery disease, according to a study published online June 15 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Obesity Has Negative Impacts on Sexual Health, Behavior

WEDNESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity has negative impacts on sexual health in both men and women, and young obese women are less likely to use contraceptive health care services and more likely to have unplanned pregnancies, according to a study published June 15 in BMJ.

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Nurses Safely and Effectively Manage HIV Therapy

WEDNESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Nurse-monitored combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-positive patients appears to be as effective and safe as doctor-monitored therapy, according to a non-inferiority study published online June 16 in The Lancet.

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Free Clinics Hold Meaningful Role in Nation's Safety Net

WEDNESDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Free clinics appear to be an important component of America's health care safety net, and primary care practices that serve sociodemographically vulnerable neighborhoods may be more likely than other practices to offer capabilities often associated with the medical home concept, according to research published in the June 14 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Darnell
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MRSA Linked to Higher Mortality in Cystic Fibrosis

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection have worse survival rates than CF patients without the infection, according to a study in the June 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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In COPD, Oral, Intravenous Steroids Bring Same Outcomes

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations treated with low-dose oral corticosteroids have outcomes similar to those treated with more costly and invasive high-dose intravenous corticosteroid therapy, according to research published in the June 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Substituting Brown for White Rice Reduces Diabetes Risk

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Substituting brown rice, or other whole grains, for white rice in a person's diet can lower their risk for type 2 diabetes, according to research published in the June 14 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Scant Evidence Links Any Factor to Alzheimer's Prevention

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- There is scant evidence that any one factor -- such as exercising or following a Mediterranean diet -- is protective of cognitive decline, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), in older adults, according to a review presented at a National Institutes of Health State-of-the-Science Conference and a subsequent conference statement, both published online June 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Plassman
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NIH State-of-the-Science Statement

HIV Nucleic Acid Testing With Automated Reporting Beneficial

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Adding nucleic acid testing (NAT) that includes automated result reporting systems to routine HIV testing programs can increase the early detection of infected individuals, particularly in settings that serve men who have sex with men (MSM), according to a study in the June 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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HDL Cholesterol Inversely Associated With Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and incident cancer risk are significantly inversely associated, and this relationship is independent of factors such as low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), age, and smoking, according to research published in the June 22 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Adolescent BP Predicts Hypertension in Young Adulthood

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Blood pressure (BP) at age 17 rises over time in a linear fashion, and both male and female adolescents with BPs in the upper range of normal face more than double the risk of hypertension in young adulthood, according to research published online June 14 in Hypertension.

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Incidental Findings Frequently Seen in Pediatric Brain Imaging

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 7 percent of children involved in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study had incidental intracranial findings, calling attention to issues related to counseling families when such findings arise in clinical situations, according to research published online June 14 in Pediatrics.

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Clear Rules, Physical Activity Cut Children's Screen Time

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- In households where parents set clear and consistent limits on screen time and where children have plenty of physical activity, children have lower odds of exceeding the American Academy of Pediatrics' recommended two-hour daily screen-time limit, according to research published online June 14 in Pediatrics.

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ARBs Linked to Modestly Higher Risk of Cancer Diagnosis

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs) appear to be associated with a modest increase in risk of a new cancer diagnosis, according to research published online June 14 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Vaccination Ends Disparities in Pneumococcal Disease

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The vaccination of young children with seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in recent years has eliminated disparities in risk for vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) associated with race and group child care attendance, according to a case-control study published online June 14 in Pediatrics.

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Less Education Linked to Higher Mortality in Diabetes

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The mortality risk among adults with diabetes differs greatly by educational level, and although the relative disparities in this population are not as strong as those in adults without diabetes, their absolute impact is greater, according to a study in the June issue of Diabetes Care.

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Preventive Intervention for Premature Infants Effective

MONDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- A home preventive care program for very premature infants and their caregivers results in improved behavioral and emotional regulation at age 2, as well as less depression and anxiety among caregivers, according to research published online June 14 in Pediatrics.

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Young Adults Focus on Health Behaviors Over Genetics

FRIDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Overall, young adults tend to favor health behaviors over genetics as the cause of common preventable diseases, but those with more behavioral risk factors were more likely to lean toward genetic explanations, according to research published online June 8 in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

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Brace Prevents Curve Progression in Scoliosis

FRIDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- The use of a Boston brace for more than 12 hours daily in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is effective in controlling curve progression, according to a prospective study published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Private Insurance Linked to Lower Hospital Mortality

FRIDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with private insurance who are hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke or pneumonia have significantly lower in-hospital mortality than patients who are uninsured or have Medicaid, according to research published online June 10 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Rotavirus Prescribing Information, Labeling Changed

FRIDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- New prescribing information and patient labeling for rotavirus vaccines has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in response to reports of vaccine-acquired rotavirus infection in infants with severe combined immunodeficiency disorder (SCID), according to a report published in the June 11 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Music Decreases Pain, Anxiety During Bone Marrow Biopsy

FRIDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Listening to music during bone marrow biopsy and aspiration can reduce both anxiety and pain intensity during the procedure, according to research published in the June issue of the AORN Journal.

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Hospira Expands Propofol and Lipsoyn Recall

FRIDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Hospira has alerted health care providers that it is expanding its March 31 recall of Propofol Injectable Emulsion 1 percent and Liposyn (Intravenous Fat Emulsion) products that include Liposyn II 10 percent, Liposyn II 20 percent, Liposyn III 10 percent, Liposyn III 20 percent, and Liposyn III 30 percent, as some of the containers may contain sub-visible inert stainless steel particles.

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Nurses and Surgeons Perceive Teamwork Differently

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- They may be on the same team, but operating room nurses and surgeons have different perceptions of communication and teamwork effectiveness in the operating room, according to research published in the June issue of the AORN Journal.

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Suppressed Anger in CAD Linked to Adverse Cardiac Events

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), suppressing anger is associated with a higher risk of adverse cardiac events, according to research published in the June 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Insulin Resistance With Normal BMI Linked to Mortality Risk

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- In adults of normal weight without diabetes, insulin resistance -- as measured with the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) -- is associated with all-cause mortality, according to research published in the June issue of Diabetes Care.

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S. aureus Infections a Greater Risk After Certain Procedures

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- The frequency and type of invasive Staphylococcus aureus infections following surgeries vary according to the type of procedure, with cardiothoracic and neurosurgical procedures linked to the highest risks, according to research published in the July issue of Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology.

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FDA: Defibtech's DBP-2800 Battery Packs Recalled

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Defibtech has alerted customers of a voluntary recall of 5,418 DBP-2800 Battery Packs used in the Lifeline Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) and ReviveR AED, as these AEDs may incorrectly recognize an error condition during charging for a shock and discontinue the charge, not providing therapy when the defected battery packs are used.

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H1N1, Seasonal Flu Have Similar Attack Rates

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- The pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus had transmissibility and clinical features similar to those of seasonal influenza A viruses, and the use of oseltamivir ring chemoprophylaxis -- along with quick identification and isolation of affected individuals -- effectively reduced the impact of 2009 H1N1 outbreaks in semiclosed settings, according to two studies published in the June 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Valproic Acid Use in Pregnancy Tied to Malformation Risk

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- In pregnant women, first-trimester use of valproic acid is associated with significantly increased risks of five congenital malformations in addition to spina bifida, according to research published in the June 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Rate of Myocardial Infarction, 30-Day Mortality Decreasing

THURSDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of acute myocardial infarction (MI) has steadily decreased since 2000, and 30-day mortality has significantly decreased over the same time period, according to research published in the June 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Lifestyle, Behaviors Affect Headache Risk in Adolescents

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- High consumption of alcoholic drinks, coffee drinking, smoking, and lack of physical activity are all associated with headaches in adolescents, according to a study published online June 7 in Headache.

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Maternal Hardships Impact Newborns' and Children's Health

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- Intimate partner violence suffered by mothers is linked to an increased obesity risk in young children, and childhood hardship is associated with women's future pregnancy outcomes, according to two studies in the June issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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B Vitamins Show No Benefit in Slowing CAD Progression

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) who have undergone percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), subsequent therapy with folic acid/vitamin B12 lowers levels of total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) but does not have a beneficial effect on disease progression, according to a study in the June 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Health Care Facilities See Rise in Violent Crimes

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of violent crimes, including rape, assault and murder, is climbing at health care facilities, according to a Sentinel Event Alert released June 3 by the Joint Commission.

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Fitness Trends Predictive of Diabetes Development

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- People who increase their cardiorespiratory fitness level over time are less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who lose fitness, according to research published in the June issue of Diabetes Care.

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NSAID Cardio Risk for Healthy People Varies by Drug

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) diclofenac and rofecoxib by healthy people is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death, but naproxen appears to have a safer cardiovascular risk profile, according to a study published online June 8 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Alcohol Dependence Treatment Tied to Social Cost Savings

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment for alcohol dependence may result in reduced median social costs associated with arrests, vehicle accidents and health care, according to a study in the May issue of Medical Care.

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Hand Hygiene Practices Low Among Health Care Providers

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses and other health care providers are often noncompliant with hand hygiene guidelines before and after procedures, though compliance is higher with high-risk procedures and when health care providers are exposed to blood, according to a study in the May issue of Applied Nursing Research.

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Pediatric Migraine Treatment Practices Vary Widely in ER

WEDNESDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- In a sample of Canadian emergency departments, children seen for migraine headaches reported frequent occurrence of attacks, and were subject to significant treatment variations by emergency department physicians, according to research published online June 7 in Pediatrics.

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Long-Term Acute Care Hospital Utilization Increasing

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalizing patients in long-term acute care hospitals after critical illness is an expensive but increasingly utilized option, according to research published in the June 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Infection Control Lapses Common in Surgical Centers

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Two-thirds of Medicare-participating ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs) have at least one lapse in their infection control practices, and a substantial number have three or more lapses, according to research published in the June 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Stress Reduction Aids Survival in Recurrent Breast Cancer

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with recurrent breast cancer who had psychological intervention for stress reduction during their initial disease deal better with the stress of disease recurrence and even improve their odds for survival over the long term, according to a study published online June 8 in Clinical Cancer Research.

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New Primary Care Model Tested in Demonstration Project

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) concept, a team-based, integrated approach to patient care, can be implemented currently by motivated primary care practices, but health system and payment reforms are needed to implement it more smoothly, according to a series of reports in a supplement to the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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One-Third of Veterans May Experience PTSD, Depression

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Up to a third of veterans returning from combat may experience depression or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), often along with alcohol misuse or aggressive behavior comorbidity, and the risk of developing dementia is nearly twice as high in veterans with PTSD as in those without, according to the results of two studies published in the June issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Fatal Medication Errors Rise in July at Teaching Hospitals

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- In July there is a significant increase in fatal medication errors at medical institutions, and this spike is at least partly due to the arrival of new medical residents, according to a study published online May 29 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Children of Single Deployed Parents See Doctor Less Often

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children of single military parents are seen less frequently for both acute-care and well-child visits while their parent is deployed, while children of a married deployed parent are seen more frequently, according to research published online June 7 in Pediatrics.

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Non-Emergency ER Admissions Have Different Needs

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Non-emergency patients admitted to hospitals through the emergency department (EDNEs) need specific health care services, including improved access, fast tracking, and continuity of care, according to research published in the May issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Several Factors Tied to Higher Depression Risk in Internship

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Several individual, internship and genetic factors are associated with the marked increase in depressive symptoms experienced by medical interns, according to research published in the June issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Many Adults With Pediatric Disorders Use Pediatric ERs

TUESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Many adult patients with chronic pediatric disorders, known as transition patients, use pediatric emergency departments -- often for complaints unrelated to their pediatric disorders -- and these patients have high rates of intensive care unit and hospital admissions, according to a study in the June issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Revised, Evidence-Based Brain Death Guideline Issued

MONDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- A new guideline for determining brain death has been issued by the American Academy of Neurology, updating the 1995 version and including a checklist to provide doctors with clarity and direction. The guideline has been published in the June 8 issue of Neurology.

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Racial Differences Exist in Asthma Prevalence and Care

MONDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Racial and ethnic differences exist in the prevalence, treatment and outcomes of asthma among children with equal access to medical care, according to a study published online June 7 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Anesthesia During Cancer Surgery May Impact Outcomes

MONDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- The use of anesthesia during cancer surgery may impact long-term outcomes and risk of cancer recurrence, according to two articles published in the June issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Smoke-Free Air Laws Reduce Cotinine Levels in Children

MONDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Smoke-free air laws appear effective in reducing cotinine levels in youths, though these effects may be negated by exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) inside the home, according to research published online June 7 in Pediatrics.

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Many Hospital Patients Readmitted Within Two Years

MONDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately 25 percent of hospital patients were readmitted to the hospital within a two-year period for the same conditions that prompted their initial admission, according to a recent report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Negative Effects of Having Premature Baby Seldom Last

MONDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- The negative impacts on mothers and families of having an extremely low birth weight (ELBW) child appear to be minimal by the time the child reaches young adulthood, except for an ongoing negative effect on parents' jobs, according to research published online June 7 in Pediatrics.

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Overlap Exists in TBI, Fractures Attributable to Abuse

MONDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- In children younger than 3, considerable overlap exists in the occurrence of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) and fractures attributable to abuse, though accidental falls occur more commonly than abuse, even among very young children, according to a study published online June 7 in Pediatrics.

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Smoking Cessation Approach Reduces Surgery Complications

MONDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Initiating a smoking cessation intervention program after acute fracture surgery and carrying it out for six weeks may reduce the risk of post-surgical complications, according to a study in the June 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Specific Care Plan Does Not Slow Decline in Alzheimer's

FRIDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- A comprehensive specific care plan carried out with biannual clinic consultations and management of problems with standardized guidelines does not decrease the rate of functional decline in individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease, according to research published June 3 in BMJ.

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Non-Married at Greater Risk of Hospitalization for Sepsis

FRIDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- Single, separated, and widowed adults have a higher risk of hospitalization for sepsis than do their married peers, and some face higher mortality rates as well, according to research published in the June issue of Chest.

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WHO Maintains Pandemic H1N1 Influenza Alert

FRIDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- The World Health Organization has decided to maintain an H1N1 flu pandemic alert based on the recommendation of 15 international influenza experts, as new cases of H1N1 are expected in the short-term during the flu season in the southern hemisphere.

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Many on Bisphosphonates Lack Information About the Drugs

FRIDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- Many individuals taking bisphosphonates are unfamiliar with potential adverse events associated with treatment and with the duration of treatment, according to a study in the May 1 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association.

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Maternal Death Greatly Reduces Child's Survival Odds

FRIDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- In rural Bangladesh, the chance of survival to 10 years of age among children whose mothers die is greatly reduced, but the death of a father has a negligible effect on a child's survival, according to a study in the June 5 issue of The Lancet.

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Mediterranean Diet May Lower Childhood Asthma Risk

FRIDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- Diet appears to be associated with asthma and wheeze in children, and eating a "Mediterranean diet" rich in fruit, vegetables and fish seems to reduce a child's risk of developing asthma and wheeze, according to an international study published in the June issue of Thorax.

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Many Ischemic Stroke Patients Arrive at ER Within Hour

FRIDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial portion of ischemic stroke patients present to emergency departments within an hour of onset, and they are more likely to receive thrombolytic therapy than those who arrive later, but both factors present room for improvement, according to research published online June 3 in Stroke.

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CDC: Many U.S. Teens Have Abused Prescription Drugs

THURSDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- One in five students high school students in the United States has abused prescription drugs at some point, according to the 2009 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey, released June 3 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Caregiving Stress May Impair Endothelial Function

THURSDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- The stress of caring for a spouse with Alzheimer's disease may increase the risk of cardiovascular events due to impaired endothelial functioning, according to research published in the June 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Electronic Patient Records Reduce Time to Treatment

THURSDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Switching from paper notes to electronic patient records (EPR) may help clinics dramatically reduce the time between a positive test result and treatment for a sexually transmitted infection, according to research published online May 21 in Sexually Transmitted Infections.

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Early Heparin Beneficial in Pulmonary Embolism

THURSDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE), starting heparin early, while the patient is still in the emergency department, is associated with decreased mortality, according to research published in the June issue of Chest.

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Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping Advocated

THURSDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Umbilical cord clamping at birth should be delayed for a few minutes, or until the cord stops pulsing, to permit transfer of important stem cells from the placenta to the newborn, according to a review published in the Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

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Many Men Disagree With No-PSA-at-75 Recommendation

THURSDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation to discontinue prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening at age 75 is not supported by many men, and men ages 75 and older show higher-risk disease and poorer survival, according to research published in the May issue of Urology.

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Cost Varies by Region in Spinal Fusion for Scoliosis

THURSDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- There is significant variation in the cost and hospital length of stay (LOS) for spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis in different regions of the United States, according to research published in the May 15 issue of Spine.

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Rural Residents Less Likely to Use Sunscreen

THURSDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Rural residents are less likely than urban residents to use sunscreen, but this may be explained by confounding factors such as differences in age and income, according to a study in the June issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Stroke Patients Benefit From Early Lipid-Lowering Therapy

THURSDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Early initiation of lipid-lowering therapy (LLT) during hospitalization for ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack correlates with improved clinical outcomes, according to research published in the May 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Vastus Lateralis May Be Better Than Deltoid for Infant Shots

WEDNESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- In infants, intramuscular vaccination in the vastus lateralis is associated with a shorter duration of crying than intramuscular vaccination in the deltoid, though the pain responses appear to be similar, according to a study in the May issue of Applied Nursing Research.

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Moms' Weight Before, During Pregnancy Tied to Kids' Issues

WEDNESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Higher pre-pregnancy weight and gestational weight gain (GWG) up to 36 weeks are linked to adverse cardiovascular risk factors and adiposity in offspring, according to research published online June 1 in Circulation.

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U.S. Cigarette Brands May Contain Higher Carcinogen Levels

WEDNESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Smokers of certain U.S. cigarette brands take in higher levels of cancer-causing tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) than smokers of some foreign cigarette brands tested in a study published online May 25 in Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Exercise Offers Benefits After Low Back Rehabilitation

WEDNESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic low back pain who participate in a post-rehabilitation exercise program enjoy benefits in trunk muscle endurance and level of disability compared to patients who receive usual care, according to a study in the May 20 issue of Spine.

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Physical Activity in Young Tied to Incident Hypertension

WEDNESDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Maintaining physical fitness and being physically active at a young age are each independently associated with a reduced risk of eventually developing hypertension, according to research published online June 1 in Hypertension.

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Post-CPR Hyperoxia Linked to Higher Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Both hyperoxia after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and non-adherence to recommended timing of interventions after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) result in significant increases in mortality, according to two studies published in the June 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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In Heart Failure, Discharges Earlier, Readmission Rates Up

TUESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patients admitted to hospitals for heart failure in 2006 fared better in-hospital than did those in 1993, but were discharged more often to nursing homes, and readmitted more frequently, according to research published in the June 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cardiac Arrest, CPR Attempts Vary by Neighborhood

TUESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Some neighborhoods consistently have more cardiac arrests than others and fewer bystanders who attempt to perform emergency cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), according to research published online June 1 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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FDA: Claris IV Medications Recalled Due to Contamination

TUESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care professionals not to use intravenous medications including metronidazole, ciprofloxacin and ondansetron manufactured by Claris Lifesciences, as the products may be contaminated.

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Ventilation Strategies Result in Similar Outcomes

TUESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV), in which the lungs are continuously inflated and oscillate at a high rate through use of small volume changes, appears to be no better and no worse than conventional ventilation in preterm infants, according to research published online June 1 in The Lancet.

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Heart Fatty Acid-Binding Protein Levels May Indicate ACS Risk

TUESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Obtaining the concentration of heart fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) may help physicians identify high-risk patients who are troponin-negative, according to research published in the June 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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