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May 2010 Briefing - Nursing

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for May 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Underage Drinking Emergency Room Visits Rise Over Holiday

MONDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Daily underage drinking-related visits to hospital emergency departments are higher over the three-day Memorial Day weekend than on an average day, according to a new study from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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Children Respond Well to Adjuvanted H1N1 Vaccine

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- An adjuvanted split virion H1N1 vaccine is more immunogenic but is also associated with more reactions compared to a whole virion, non-adjuvanted vaccine in children, according to research published online May 27 in BMJ.

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Less Frequent Toothbrushing Linked to Heart Disease

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Poor oral hygiene is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as higher concentrations of C-reactive protein and fibrinogen, according to research published online May 27 in BMJ.

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Use of Statins After Stroke Increasing Slowly

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of stroke patients given prescriptions for evidence-based statin treatment at hospital discharge has increased over time, but nearly one in five still leaves the hospital without a prescription, according to research published online May 27 in Stroke.

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CT Contrast Agents May Cause Delayed Adverse Reactions

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Delayed adverse reactions (DARs) occur more frequently in patients undergoing contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) than in those undergoing unenhanced CT, according to a study in the June issue of Radiology.

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Genetic Tests That Don't Ease Decision Making Not Desired

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic information that does not clarify decision making about cancer treatment may not be desired, and its impact differs depending on clinical relevance to the recipient, according to research published online May 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Statins May Reduce Revision Risk After Hip Arthroplasty

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of revision after primary total hip arthroplasty is lower among those using statins than those not on statins, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Depression Key Consideration in Acute Coronary Syndrome

FRIDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Health care providers should address depressive symptoms in survivors of acute coronary syndrome (ACS), especially women, whose early recovery may differ from their male counterparts, according to a prospective longitudinal study published in the May issue of Applied Nursing Research.

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In Diabetes Patients at Low CVD Risk, Aspirin Not Recommended

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose aspirin for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is reasonable for adults with diabetes who are at increased CVD risk but should not be routinely recommended for those at low CVD risk, according to a combined statement from the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association, and the American College of Cardiology Foundation, published online May 27 in Circulation, Diabetes Care, and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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CDC Outlines State Health-Care-Associated Infection Data

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention outlined state health-care-associated infection (HAI) data during a telebriefing on May 27 to coincide with a report in the May 28 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Analysis Questions Quality of Direct-to-Consumer Ads

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) for urological medications lacks research data or references to substantiate the claims they make, pointing to room for improvement in the information offered by such advertisements, according to an analysis published in the May issue of Urology.

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Indoor Tanning Beds/Booths Increase Melanoma Risk

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Use of indoor tanning equipment substantially increases the risk of melanoma, with the highest risk found for people who use high-speed/intensity and high-pressure indoor tanning beds, according to a report published online May 26 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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FDA: Baxter Recalling Hyaluronidase Human Injection

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Baxter International Inc. has announced a voluntary recall of hyaluronidase human injection (Hylenex recombinant), as particulate matter was found in a limited number of vials during standard stability testing.

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Early Glycemic Control Vital in Type 1 Diabetes

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Intense glycemic control early on should be attempted for individuals with type 1 diabetes to reduce the risk of complications related to diabetes arising over time, according to research published in the May issue of Diabetes.

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Antiretroviral Therapy Greatly Cuts HIV Partner Transmission

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- In heterosexual HIV-1 patients, antiretroviral therapy (ART) can reduce the risk of HIV transmission to sexual partners by 92 percent, according to research published online May 27 in The Lancet.

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Adherence to Medication Labeling Protocol Found Inconsistent

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Just 70 percent of surgical staff members were found to adhere to a new medication labeling protocol in an observational study conducted by nursing staff at the Cleveland Clinic, and reported in the May issue of the AORN Journal.

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FDA Changes Label on Weight-Loss Drug Orlistat

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has alerted health care providers and consumers regarding a label change to the weight-loss drug orlistat, marketed by prescription by F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd. as Xenical (orlistat 120 mg) and over-the-counter (OTC) without a prescription by GSK Consumer Healthcare as Alli (orlistat 60 mg), due to the potential but rare risk of severe liver injury.

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New Tramadol Label Warns of Suicide, Overdose Risks

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Ortho-McNeil-Janssen have alerted health care professionals of changes to the prescribing information warnings section for tramadol, a centrally acting synthetic opioid analgesic used to manage moderate to moderately severe chronic pain.

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FDA: Proton Pump Inhibitors Linked to Fracture Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has alerted consumers and health care providers regarding the potential increased risk of hip, wrist and spine fractures associated with high doses or long-term use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs).

FDA's MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting Program
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Early Antibiotics in COPD Hospitalizations Beneficial

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients hospitalized for exacerbations of their illness who receive antibiotic treatment within the first two days of their hospitalization fare better than those who do not, according to research published in the May 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Hypertension Control Hits Healthy People 2010 Goal

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of hypertensive patients with control of the condition has reached a Healthy People 2010 goal, though rates of hypertension have remained unchanged during the past decade, according to research published in the May 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Large Variations in C-Section Rates Seen in British Columbia

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- There is a large, unexplained variation in rates of cesarean deliveries across the 16 health service delivery districts of British Columbia, Canada, according to research published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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New Rule Reduces Low-Yield Outpatient Imaging Exams

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- A rule that prevents medical support staff from completing computerized orders for outpatient imaging exams that have a high likelihood of being negative results in fewer low-yield examinations and an increased percentage of tests ordered by clinicians themselves, according to a study in the June issue of Radiology.

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Common School Scoliosis Screening Test Lacks Precision

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- The simple and common forward bending test (FBT) used in school scoliosis screening programs lacks precision for detecting spinal curvature and by itself is insufficient, according to a meta-analysis published in the May 1 issue of Spine.

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Pregnant Women Using Herbals Despite Lack of Safety Data

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Many women use herbal or natural products immediately prior to or during pregnancy, though little is known about these products' safety or efficacy, according to two articles published in the May issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Increasing Exercise Linked to Decreasing Obesity in Women

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- In adult women, there is a crude, graded inverse dose-response relationship between total volume of leisure-time physical activity and obesity, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Moderate Drinkers' Health Better Than Non-Drinkers'

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Moderate drinkers have a better health status than non-drinkers or heavy drinkers, but moderate alcohol consumption may be a marker, rather than a cause, of this status, according to research published May 19 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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H1N1 in Pregnant Women Is Serious Threat to Fetuses

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women admitted to the hospital with pandemic novel influenza A(H1N1) are at increased risk for abdominal and gastrointestinal symptoms, fetal distress and mortality, emergency cesarean delivery, and premature births, according to research published in the May 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Survivors of Childhood Cancer Less Healthy as Adults

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Adult survivors of childhood cancers appear to suffer worse health outcomes and more job limitations than people who never had cancer, according to research published online May 24 in Cancer.

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Frequent Doctor Visits Benefit Hypertensive Diabetes Patients

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- In hypertensive patients with diabetes, shorter intervals between encounters with physicians are associated with a faster decrease in blood pressure and earlier blood pressure normalization -- particularly intervals shorter than those currently recommended, according to a study published online May 24 in Hypertension.

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Sugar-Sweetened Beverages May Affect Blood Pressure

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) has a significant association with decreased blood pressure, according to research published online May 24 in Circulation.

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Childhood Mortality Worldwide May Be Lower Than Thought

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Among children younger than 5, the annual global death toll may be 820,000 lower than the latest UNICEF estimate, as there has been progress in many poorer countries toward achieving the Millennium Development Goal 4 of reducing mortality in this age group by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015, according to an article published online May 24 in The Lancet.

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Alfalfa Sprouts Recalled Due to Salmonella Outbreak

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Caldwell Fresh Foods has issued a recall of raw alfalfa sprouts due to a Salmonella Newport outbreak in 10 states, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Recent Outbreak of Dengue in Key West Raises Concern

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- A recent outbreak of 28 dengue cases in Key West, Fla., should prompt clinicians to consider dengue in diagnosing patients who live in or have recently traveled to subtropical parts of the United States, according to a report published in the May 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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On-Time Vaccinations in First Year Don't Hurt Development

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Children who are vaccinated on schedule in their first year of life exhibit neuropsychological development at ages 7 to 10 that is as good as or better than children who receive delayed vaccination or do not get vaccinated, according to a study published online May 24 in Pediatrics.

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Battery Ingestions Have Devastating Complications

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- The increased use of 20-mm lithium button batteries has led to a rise in devastating complications from their ingestion. Prevention should be encouraged through education and secure household product design, and, when prevention doesn't work, the removal of batteries from the esophagus must be expedited to prevent major complications, according to two studies published online May 24 in Pediatrics.

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AAP Statement Urges Drowning Prevention Efforts

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- With drowning a leading cause of accidental death in children, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is urging pediatricians to actively educate and counsel parents and support community drowning prevention efforts in a revised policy statement published online May 24 in Pediatrics.

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Major Pool Code Violations Common in United States

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Swimming pool operation violations are relatively common in the United States, with almost one out of eight inspections resulting in immediate pool closure because of serious code violations, according to a report published in the May 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Low Phosphorus Linked to Early Death in HIV Therapy

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Low blood phosphorus levels are associated with high death rates among HIV-infected patients beginning antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa, according to a study published online May 18 in PLoS ONE.

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Misoprostol Does Not Decrease Postpartum Hemorrhage

FRIDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- The prostaglandin analogue misoprostol, when added to standard uterotonic therapy, does not result in decreased postpartum blood loss, according to research published in the May 22 issue of The Lancet.

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Intervention Improves Parent-Autistic Child Interactions

FRIDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- A parent-mediated social communication intervention in preschool children with autism improves parent-child interaction but does not result in clinically significant benefits in autism severity, according to research published in the May 21 online edition of The Lancet.

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Statins Have Wide Range of Unintended Adverse Effects

FRIDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Statins appear to have no significant association with a large number of diseases, but they may have a wide range of unintended adverse effects, according to data published in the May 20 online edition of the BMJ.

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Article Addresses Suicide Risks for Seniors in Residential Homes

THURSDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly residents of communal living facilities are at risk of suicidal behaviors that may be due to their underlying reasons for moving into the residential homes, and public health systems and residential communities should take steps to counter these behaviors, according to an article published online May 18 in PLoS Medicine.

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Self-Reported Peanut, Tree Nut Allergies in Children on the Rise

MONDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Although the number of adults allergic to peanuts, tree nuts and sesame seems to have remained relatively stable since 1997, the prevalence of self-reported peanut and tree nut allergies in children has climbed substantially, according to research published online May 12 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Faster Weight Loss Appears to Yield Better Results

THURSDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- People who lose greater amounts of weight initially in weight-loss attempts may experience better weight loss and maintenance results than those who lose weight gradually, according to research published in the June issue of the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

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Depression Common at End of Terminal Cancer

THURSDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is a common condition among patients with metastatic cancer, and those with a combination of psychosocial vulnerability and greater physical suffering are at the highest risk, according to a study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Maternal Measles Antibodies Wane by 6 Months of Age

WEDNESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal measles antibodies wane quickly after birth, with nearly all babies losing maternal antibody protection by age 6 months, according to research published online May 18 in the BMJ.

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Antibiotic Resistance May Persist Months After Treatment

WEDNESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- After a course of antibiotics for respiratory or urinary tract infection, an individual is likely to develop resistance to the antibiotic that may persist for up to 12 months, according to research published online May 18 in the BMJ.

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TB Global Fight Still Has a Way to Go

WEDNESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Even though 36 million people worldwide were cured of tuberculosis and 6 million lives were saved between 1995 and 2008, the disease still takes a substantial toll and long-term goals for its eradication may not be met, according to a paper published online May 19 in The Lancet, the first in a series of papers on tuberculosis.

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Sagent Announces Recall of Metronidazole Injection

WEDNESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Sagent Pharmaceuticals Inc. has announced a nationwide voluntary recall of all lots of metronidazole injection, USP 500 mg/100 mL, distributed by the company and manufactured by Claris Lifesciences, due to non-sterility in two lots of the product, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

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Fathers Show Risk of Prenatal, Postpartum Depression

TUESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial number of expecting and new fathers have prenatal and postpartum depression, and paternal depression is moderately correlated with maternal depression, according to research published in the May 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Racial Disparities Reduced in Quality Monitoring Program

TUESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals enrolled in a national quality monitoring and improvement program showed improvements in adherence to evidence-based guidelines for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), as well as reductions or elimination of racial/ethnic care disparities, according to research published May 17 in the journal Circulation.

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Race May Impact Clinician's Infant Drug Screening Choices

MONDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Health care providers may be impacted by maternal race in determining whether to screen for illicit drug exposure in infants, regardless of their institution's standard criteria for screening, according to a study published online May 17 in Pediatrics.

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Higher Pesticide Exposure Linked to Increased ADHD Risk

MONDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of organophosphate exposure have been associated with adverse effects on neurodevelopment, and cross-sectional data suggest that levels of exposure common in U.S. children may contribute to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) prevalence, according to research published online May 17 in Pediatrics.

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A Few Preventive Health Services Could Save Many Lives

MONDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Increased use of a few proven clinical preventive services, especially those aimed at reducing cardiovascular disease, could result in substantial improvements in health on a population-wide level, according to a study published online May 4 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Sprix Approved for Moderate-to-Severe Pain

MONDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Roxro Pharma's Sprix (ketorolac tromethamine) nasal spray has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the short-term treatment of moderate to moderately severe pain, the manufacturer said Monday in a news release.

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Antibiotic Patterns for S. Aureus in Children Have Changed

MONDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Since the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infections, antibiotic treatment for hospitalized children with S. aureus infections has changed dramatically, and clindamycin has become the primary antibiotic treatment for those infections, according to research published online May 17 in Pediatrics.

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CPAP Found Feasible for Extremely Preterm Infants

MONDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- In extremely preterm infants, early treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may be a viable alternative to early treatment with intubation and surfactant, according to a study published online May 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the American Thoracic Society, held from May 14 to 19 in New Orleans. The study also found that a lower target range of oxygen saturation does not reduce a composite of severe retinopathy or death and may be associated with increased mortality.

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Patterns Changing in Substance Use Admissions

MONDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Some patterns of substance use treatment admissions changed substantially from 1998 to 2008, according to a study published in April by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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Earliest Receipt of Alteplase Benefits Stroke Outcomes Most

FRIDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- The thrombolytic drug alteplase should be given as soon as possible after a stroke, as the odds of a favorable outcome decrease as the time to treatment increases, according to a pooled analysis published online May 15 in The Lancet.

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Many General Internists Leave Field by Mid-Career

FRIDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Roughly one out of six general internists are leaving internal medicine by mid-career, a substantially higher proportion compared to internal medicine subspecialists, according to survey results published April 29 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Interrupted Doctors Spend Less Time on Clinical Tasks

FRIDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department doctors who are interrupted may decrease the time they spend on clinical tasks and even delay or fail to return to some tasks, which could have a negative impact on patient safety, according to a study published online May 12 in Quality and Safety in Health Care.

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Mammograms Before Age 40 May Not Be Appropriate

FRIDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Screening mammography for women under age 40 results in high rates of recall and additional imaging but low cancer detection rates, according to research published online May 3 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Early Child Care May Affect Functioning in Teenage Years

FRIDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- The quality and quantity of early child care is associated with functioning, including academic achievement, at age 15, according to a study published in the May/June issue of Child Development. Another study in the same issue found increased cortisol levels in children when they were at full-time, home-based day care versus when they were at home.

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Article Stresses Need for More Pediatric Research Funding

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of the National Institutes of Health budget dedicated to pediatric research has declined since 1993, despite the potential impact early treatment and prevention could have on disease burden and financial costs, according to an article published online May 10 in Pediatrics. Separate research in the same issue found that various factors affect parents' understanding of the risks and benefits of studies involving their children.

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FDA and GE Issue Class I Recall of Anesthesia Systems

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and GE Healthcare have alerted health care professionals of a Class I recall of specific lots of Aisys and Avance Anesthesia Systems due to a defect in the control board wiring harnesses.

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Mental Health Disorders Stable Among U.K. Military Personnel

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- From 2003 to 2009, the prevalence of mental health disorders, such as anxiety and depression, among military personnel from the United Kingdom remained stable, although those deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan have an increased risk of alcohol misuse compared with those who have not been deployed, according to a study published online May 13 in The Lancet.

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Steps Per Day Linked to Metabolic Syndrome Prevalence

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Although public health recommendations have tended to focus on moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, an active lifestyle as measured by steps per day is associated with a reduced prevalence of both metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, according to research published online May 4 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Environmental Exposures Can Affect Puberty in Young Girls

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Environmental exposure to the chemical classes known as phenols, phthalates and phytoestrogens may affect young girls' pubertal development, putting them at risk for health complications later in life, according to a study published online in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Sucrose or Glucose Before Shots Reduces Infants' Crying

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- The administration of sucrose or glucose prior to immunization in infants aged 1 to 12 months reduces the incidence and duration of crying as well as pain scores, according to research published online May 12 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Long Work Hours May Adversely Affect Heart Health

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Working overtime could be bad for heart health, as it is associated with an increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), according to research published online May 11 in the European Heart Journal.

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FDA Warns Consumers Against Swallowing Topical Benadryl

THURSDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has alerted consumers regarding potentially serious side effects associated with mistakenly swallowing Benadryl Extra Strength Itch Stopping Gel, an over-the-counter (OTC) product intended only for topical use.

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Maternal Vitamin A Improves Offspring's Lung Function

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal vitamin A supplementation before, during, and after pregnancy in an undernourished population appears to result in improved lung function in offspring, according to a study reported in the May 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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IOM Proposes Framework for Evaluating Health Claims

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration should evaluate claims of foods' and nutritional supplements' health benefits with the same rigor it uses in evaluating approvals of medicines and medical technology, according to a new report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM).

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Removing Financial Incentives May Reduce Performance

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- The focus of clinicians may change and their performance levels could drop when previously established financial incentives are removed, according to research published May 11 in BMJ.

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New FDA Program Targets Misleading Drug Advertising

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced the launch of a new program to educate health care providers regarding their role in making certain that advertisements and promotions for prescription drugs are truthful and not misleading.

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Patients Deem Risks of Chemo Error Low, Potential Harm High

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- While patients consider the risk of error in chemotherapy to be low, they perceive the potential harm to be substantial, and most agree patients can help prevent errors, according to research published online May 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Infections Cause Most Deaths in Children Under 5 Worldwide

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- In 2008, there were an estimated 8.795 million deaths in children younger than 5 worldwide; infectious diseases caused more than two-thirds of these deaths, and almost half of them occurred in just five countries, according to an analysis published online May 12 in The Lancet.

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Opioid Therapy Linked to Avoidance of Some Screenings

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Patients using chronic opioid therapy for non-cancer pain may have a lower likelihood of receiving some preventive services, according to a study published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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High BMI Partly Explains Family-Based Diabetes Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- A high body mass index (BMI) and, to some extent, specific lifestyle factors may explain a substantial part of the association between family history of diabetes and type 2 diabetes risk, according to research published in the April issue of Diabetes Care.

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Community Prevention Program Reduces Falls Over 12 Months

WEDNESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- A comprehensive community fall prevention program may lower the number of falls and improve clinical outcomes in older individuals at high risk for falls, according to a study published online May 11 in BMJ.

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CDC: U.S. Preterm Birth Rate Declines From 2006 to 2008

TUESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- In 2008, for the second year in a row, the U.S. preterm birth rate (defined as birth prior to 37 weeks of gestation) declined after a long period of relatively steady increase, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Abuse Linked to Depression in Older Women

TUESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- In older, functionally independent women, physical and/or verbal abuse is associated with increased depressive symptoms and poorer mental health, according to a study published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine. A second study published in the journal found that older adults with depressive symptoms may benefit as much from an individualized physical activity program as from social visits.

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Family Physicians Still Provide Many Well-Child Visits

TUESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Although provision of prenatal visits by family physicians has decreased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, family physicians continue to provide a substantial proportion of well-child examinations during the first two years of life, according to a study published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine. Another study published in the same journal found that urban parents are mostly receptive to a pilot intervention aimed at reducing obesity in preschoolers.

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Dizziness in the Elderly Often Due to Cardiovascular Disease

TUESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- In over half of elderly patients seen in primary care with a complaint of dizziness, cardiovascular disease is a contributing factor, and an adverse drug effect is a contributing factor in about one-fourth of patients, according to research published in the May 10 issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Restless Legs Syndrome Is Frequently Familial

TUESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Restless legs syndrome (RLS) has a high familial rate, and siblings of those who are severely affected by the disease appear to be at increased risk of developing it themselves, according to research published in the May issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Benefits Found Lacking for High-Dose Proton Pump Inhibitors

TUESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with high doses of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is not associated with reduced rates of rebleeding, surgical intervention, or death in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers compared to non-high-dose PPI treatment, according to a meta-analysis published in the May 10 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine alongside several other studies that explore the side effects associated with PPIs.

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Fluctuating Blood Pressure May Increase Risk of CVD in Elderly

MONDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure (BP) and greater BP fluctuations are associated with an increased risk for cerebrovascular disease in older adults, according to research published in the May issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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In-Hospital Pediatric Mortality Tied to Patient Characteristics

MONDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Patient characteristics, including age and severity of diagnosis are substantive factors associated with pediatric in-patient deaths, and reducing variability within and between pediatric hospitals may improve mortality rates, according to research published online May 10 in Pediatrics.

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Sleep Disorders May Be Underdiagnosed in Children

MONDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of sleep diagnoses for children given by primary care providers is lower than prevalence rates reported in epidemiological studies, suggesting that these providers may be under-diagnosing sleep disorders in pediatric patients, according to research published online May 10 in Pediatrics.

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Infants Bottle-Fed Early More Likely to Empty Bottle Later

MONDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Infants who are mainly bottle-fed in early infancy are more likely to empty their bottle in late infancy compared to those mainly breast-fed in early infancy, suggesting a lack of self-regulation that may contribute to childhood obesity, according to a study published online May 10 in Pediatrics.

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Opioid Misuse Risk Factors Differ for Men and Women

MONDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Men at risk for the misuse of prescription opioids taken for pain are more likely to have legal and behavioral problems, while women who misuse are more likely to have emotional or psychological issues, according to a study in the April issue of the Journal of Pain.

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Poor Sleep Common in Assisted Living Facility Residents

MONDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Many residents of assisted living facilities (ALFs) experience poor sleep, which appears to correlate with lower quality of life, difficulty in daily functioning, and increased depression, according to research published in the May issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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High-Pressure Jobs Tied to Heart Disease Risk in Women

FRIDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Women in a high-pressure work environment have an increased risk of developing ischemic heart disease, according to research published in the May issue of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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CDC: California Increases HBV Vaccination in At-Risk Adults

FRIDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- In California, a public health project initiative has increased hepatitis B vaccinations among at-risk adults. However, in the United States there is an increasing incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma -- which often results from hepatitis B infection, according to two reports published in the May 7 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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In Abuse Talks, Parents Focus Disproportionately on Strangers

FRIDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- In discussions with their children regarding sexual abuse, parents tend to focus on strangers as the most likely offenders and may neglect to discuss adults the children know as potential threats, according to a study published in Child Maltreatment.

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CDC Finds Rotavirus Vaccine Coverage Is Increasing

FRIDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Since routine rotavirus vaccination of infants began in February 2006, coverage has steadily increased but still lags behind coverage for other infant vaccines, according to a report published in the May 7 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Iron Deficiency in ICU Patients Tied to Higher Transfusion Rate

FRIDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- In patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), functional iron deficiency -- defined as low reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr) -- is common, and is strongly associated with higher transfusion requirements, according to a study in the May issue of Anesthesiology.

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Article Lays Out Nurses' Role in Safe Handling of Chemotherapy

FRIDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Perioperative nurses can play a crucial role in developing best practices for handling chemotherapy in perioperative practice, and in providing preoperative and postoperative education to patients and their families, according to an article published in the April issue of the AORN Journal.

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Spouses of Dementia Patients Have Higher Risk of Dementia

FRIDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Among older married couples in which one spouse has dementia, the other spouse -- especially the husband -- has a significantly higher risk of also developing dementia, and a potential causal factor may be the chronic, often severe stress associated with dementia caregiving, according to a study published online May 6 in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Autonomous Motivation May Have Large Role in Weight Loss

FRIDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Autonomous motivation is a potential intervention target for increasing adherence to self-monitoring in a weight-loss program and weight loss itself, according to a study published in the May 2010 issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

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Panel Urges More Action on Environmental Cancer Risks

THURSDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- The burden of environmentally-induced cancer has been greatly underestimated, and action must be taken to assess the effects of environmental contaminants on human health, according to a May 6 report from the President's Cancer Panel.

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High Body Mass Index Linked to Low Back Pain

THURSDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- A high body mass index is associated with an increased prevalence of low back pain, especially in women, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of Spine.

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Working Insured Not Getting Suggested Preventive Services

THURSDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Working adults with health insurance are not meeting recommendations for clinical preventive services, and, among these workers, there are disparities related to socioeconomic status, according to research published in the May/June issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

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Vaccine May Have Role in Dravet Onset; Does Not Cause Disease

THURSDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Pertussis vaccination may cause an earlier onset of Dravet syndrome in children who are destined to develop the disease because of a mutation, but the vaccine does not appear to affect outcomes and there is no reason to withhold it, according to research published online May 5 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Job Satisfaction Up for Specialty-Certified Critical Care Nurses

THURSDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses certified in critical care are more satisfied with their jobs and careers and feel more empowered than their non-certified peers, and may be less likely to leave a job or the profession altogether, according to research published in the May 1 issue of the American Journal of Critical Care.

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High Resting Heart Rate Predicts Major Cardio Events

THURSDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD), a high resting heart rate is associated with an increase in major cardiovascular events, and the risk goes up as resting heart rate increases, according to research published in the April 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Preconception Counseling Benefits Teens With Diabetes

THURSDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- A preconception counseling program aimed at female teenagers with type 1 diabetes is beneficial and cost-effective, and its effects are sustained for at least nine months, according to research published in the April issue of Diabetes Care.

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Seminar Addresses State of Childhood Obesity

THURSDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Although the rapid increase in childhood obesity prevalence in developed countries may be stabilizing, rates have risen substantially since the 1970s, and efforts to prevent obesity should continue at all levels, though bariatric surgery should be used only as a last-resort treatment in extreme cases, according to a seminar published online May 6 in The Lancet.

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Bar-Code Technology Reduces Medication Errors in Hospitals

WEDNESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Use of bar-code verification technology can substantially decrease both transcription errors and medication administration errors in hospitals, according to research published in the May 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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WHO Committee Cites Major Gaps in H1N1 Knowledge

WEDNESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Although researchers have obtained important information about the natural history and clinical management of 2009 H1N1 virus infection, considerable research gaps remain, according to a review published in the May 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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FDA Orders Recall of Colleague Volumetric Infusion Pumps

WEDNESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified Baxter Healthcare Corp. that the company must recall and destroy all Colleague Volumetric Infusion Pumps currently being used in the United States, which may number 200,000.

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Motor Vehicle Accidents Leading Cause of Teen Death

WEDNESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- On average, more than 16,000 12- to 19-year-olds die each year in the United States, and the leading cause of death among this age group is motor vehicle accidents, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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China Bound for Cardiovascular Disease Epidemic

WEDNESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- The inevitable growth and aging of China's population will increase its rate of cardiovascular disease (CVD) by more than 50 percent in the next 20 years, but reducing or eliminating individual risk trends could help counteract the expected epidemic, according to research published online May 4 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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White Paper Addresses Pros and Cons of HPV Typing

WEDNESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- A new white paper -- "What is the Role of HPV Typing in the United States Now and in the Next Five Years in a Vaccinated Population?" -- provides guidance to clinicians about the administration of advanced screening technologies for cervical cancer prevention. The paper was published online April 24 in Gynecologic Oncology.

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Prognosis Varies Per Glycemic Index Pre-Revascularization

WEDNESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Having a low -- but not too low -- glycemic index prior to surgery is optimal for best cardiovascular outcomes after coronary revascularization in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), according to a study in the April 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Concomitant Vaccination Feasible in Adolescents

WEDNESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- In adolescents, co-administration of the Gardasil, Menactra, and Adacel vaccines is not associated with decreased safety, tolerability or immunogenicity of the individual vaccines, according to a study published online May 3 in Pediatrics.

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Early Heart Failure Follow-Up Tied to Lower Readmission Rate

TUESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who are hospitalized for heart failure are unlikely to have early follow-up after discharge, but those who are discharged from hospitals that have a higher rate of following up within one week have a lower risk of being readmitted within 30 days, according to a study published in the May 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Pneumococcal Vaccine Not Found to Reduce Heart Risks

TUESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- In older men, receipt of pneumococcal vaccine is not linked to a reduced risk of acute myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke, according to a study in the May 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Vitamin A May Not Prevent Pregnancy-Related Deaths

TUESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Weekly vitamin A supplements given to women of reproductive age may not reduce pregnancy-related deaths or all-cause mortality, according to research published online May 4 in The Lancet.

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Cost Barriers Hamper Herpes Zoster Vaccination of Seniors

TUESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Though most physicians recommend the use of herpes zoster vaccine in older adults, they are hampered by its financial barriers, according to survey results published in the May 4 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine. A study in the same issue found that the vaccine is well tolerated in older adults.

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Most People Don't Know Which Hospitals Are Stroke-Certified

TUESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Despite believing that it is important to know where to get specialty stroke care, most Americans do not know which hospitals in their area are considered stroke-certified, according to the results of a survey released by the American Stroke Association on May 3.

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Pediatricians May Not Recognize High Blood Pressure

TUESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- At some pediatric practices, many cases of elevated blood pressure go unrecognized, and the most important factors associated with under-recognition are an absence of cardiovascular disease risk factors such as obviously elevated blood pressure, obesity, and family history of cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online May 3 in Pediatrics.

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Rate of Childhood Obesity, Overweight Varies by State

MONDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- In 2007, there were substantial geographic disparities in childhood overweight and obesity, with the prevalence increasing in many states from 2003 to 2007, according to data published online May 3 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Antidepressants in Pregnancy May Impact Child Behavior

MONDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Antidepressant use during pregnancy and twin birth weight differences may affect later behavior in children, while nicotine use during pregnancy may lead to sleep disturbances in children, according to three studies published in the May issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Obese Children Are More Likely to Be Bullied

MONDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Obese children are more likely to be bullied than their normal-weight peers, regardless of several potential academic, social and sociodemographic confounders, according to research published online May 3 in Pediatrics.

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Children's and Infants' Liquid Medicines Recalled

MONDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- McNeil Consumer Healthcare and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have alerted health care professionals of the voluntary recall of various over-the-counter liquid products for children and infants, including Tylenol, Motrin, Zyrtec and Benadryl products, as some of them may not meet quality standards.

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