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October 2009 Briefing - Nursing

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for October 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Uninsured Children May Be More Likely to Die in the Hospital

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- In-hospital all-cause mortality is higher among uninsured children than among those who have insurance, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Public Health.

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Self-Reports Underestimate Number of Pregnant Smokers

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Relying on women to self-report whether they smoke results in many pregnant smokers going undetected each year, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in BMJ.

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Swine Flu Radiographic and CT Imaging Patterns Studied

FRIDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in one or both lungs with consolidation are the most common computed radiographic (CR) and computed tomography (CT) images of patients with swine-origin influenza A (S-OIV), according to a study to be published in the December issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

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Study Analyzes Role of STAT3 Genetic Variants in Obesity

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Intake of dietary saturated fat may exacerbate the effects of certain gene mutations associated with body weight regulation and glucose homeostasis, according to a study in the November issue of the Journal of Nutrition.

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ACE Inhibitors May Negatively Impact CABG Outcomes

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The preoperative use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor therapy before coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) may increase risk of mortality and other adverse outcomes, according to research published in the Nov. 3 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Sex Hormones Link to Diabetes in Older Women Examined

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Adiposity and insulin resistance to varying degrees may explain the association of endogenous bioavailable testosterone (T) with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in postmenopausal women, but these factors do not completely explain the associations of estradiol (E2) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) with the condition, according to the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis published in the November issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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HIV Stigma May Still Impact Medical Care Negatively

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- A stigma felt by HIV/AIDS patients may negatively impact their access to medical care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), according to a study in the October issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Pain Among Men and Women War Veterans Evaluated

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Among veterans of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF), women have a lower prevalence of overall pain, moderate-severe pain, and persistent pain compared to men, according to a study in the October issue of Pain Medicine.

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Vitamin D Deficiency Found Common in American Children

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Suboptimal levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) are common in American children, especially non-Hispanic blacks and Mexican-Americans, according to a study in the November issue of Pediatrics.

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Overweight Patients May Have Effect on Doctor's Attitude

THURSDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians have lower respect for patients with high body mass index (BMI), which may have an impact on patient care and outcomes, according to a study published online Sept. 18 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Helps Overcome Winter Blues

THURSDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with seasonal affective disorder who undergo a one-year course of cognitive behavioral therapy, either on its own or in combination with light therapy, are less likely to have a recurrence of winter depression than their counterparts who undergo light therapy alone, according to a study in the September issue of Behavior Therapy.

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Antibiotic Prophylaxis May Halt UTI Recurrence in Children

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In children with recurrent urinary tract infections, low-dose, continuous oral antibiotic therapy may help prevent future recurrences, according to an Australian study in the Oct. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Impact of Childhood Sleep Patterns on Obesity Evaluated

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In children, getting more sleep on weekends and holidays may reduce the risk of overweight or obesity associated with reduced sleep during weekdays, according to a Chinese study published online Oct. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Link Between Nicotinic Acid and Atherosclerosis Examined

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and atherosclerotic disease, daily use of high-dose nicotinic acid may help reduce atherosclerosis, according to research completed in the United Kingdom and published in the Nov. 3 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Importance of ST-Segment Resolution Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), ST-segment resolution at four hours after treatment may predict outcomes after fibrinolysis, but has limited prognostic value after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI), according to the DANish trial in Acute Myocardial Infarction-2 (DANAMI-2) substudy published in the Nov. 3 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Liquid-Based Cytology Found No Better Than Pap Smear

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Liquid-based cytology has no better sensitivity or specificity than conventional cytology for detection of cervical cancer precursors, according to a study in the Oct. 28 issue of Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Rate of Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease Evaluated

TUESDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and Alzheimer's disease, the presence of DM slows the rate of cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease, according to a prospective, multi-center study in the Oct. 27 issue of Neurology.

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Medical School Enrollment Continues to Expand

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 18,400 students enrolled in medical school in the United States in 2009, a 2 percent increase over the previous year, but even more expansion is needed to meet future demand, according to an Oct. 20 report from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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H1N1 Can Be Particular Threat to Transplant Recipients

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiothoracic surgeons should be vigilant for signs of the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus among their patients as the flu season approaches, and aggressively treat any cases, according to an article published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation.

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Far Fewer H1N1 Vaccine Doses Than Expected Are Available

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Because of production delays, far fewer than the goal of 40 million doses of H1N1 influenza vaccine will be available in the United States by the end of October, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued an emergency use authorization for the investigational antiviral drug peramivir intravenous in certain patients with suspected or confirmed H1N1 infection.

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Steroid Adherence in Difficult Asthma Cases Examined

MONDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with difficult-to-control asthma, a significant proportion are non-adherent to inhaled and oral corticosteroid therapy, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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South Asians Show Higher Fat Mass Than Other Ethnicities

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- South Asians may have higher fat mass and lower lean mass than some other ethnic groups, which may be associated with increased Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) and insulin levels, according to a study published online Oct. 9 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Death After Bariatric Surgery in Extremely Obese Examined

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients who undergo bariatric surgery, extreme obesity and a high burden of chronic disease is associated with an increased risk of death within one year post-surgery, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Broad Asthma Screening May Offer Minimal Health Gains

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The potential health benefits from asthma screenings in children seem to be smaller than previously expected, according to research published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Cocoa Can Reduce Levels of Inflammatory Biomarkers

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease, cocoa may significantly decrease levels of some inflammatory biomarkers, suggesting that the flavonoids in cocoa may help protect against atherosclerosis, according to a study in the Nov. 1 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Researchers Evaluate New Prostate Specific Antigen Test

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A new test for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels is considerably more sensitive than commercial assays and allows better monitoring for recurrence after prostatectomy for early-stage prostate cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Hypertension and Cardiac Link During Pregnancy Analyzed

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a history of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy are at higher risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, particularly if the hypertension is recurrent, according to a Norwegian study in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Risks Associated With Thyroid Surgery in the Elderly Explored

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with more youthful patients, thyroid surgery presents few additional risks when performed in elderly patients, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Neonatal Outcomes Examined in Cancer Pregnancies

FRIDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancies in women with cancer tend to have good outcomes overall, but have been associated with high rates of induced labor and newborn admission to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Article Reviews Techniques for Idiopathic Clubfoot Correction

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The techniques for performing the Ponseti and French functional methods of treating idiopathic clubfeet were the focus of an article in a supplement to the October Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Review Evaluates Systems of Care for STEMI Patients

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In Europe and North America, improvements in systems of care may improve outcomes in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to a state-of-the-art paper published in the October issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Some Hospital Staff Predicted to Be Infection Superspreaders

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital staff such as therapists and radiologists who are in contact with all patients have the potential to be superspreaders of infection if they fail to wash their hands regularly, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Remote Patient Monitoring May Lower Heart Failure Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure patients whose status was checked regularly using remote patient monitoring (RPM), had reduced risk of death and hospitalization compared to patients who received usual standard of care, according to a study in the Oct. 27 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Pregnancy Weight Gain Can Affect Subsequent Retention

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Obese women who gain excessive amounts of weight during pregnancy are at increased risk of retaining weight at one-year postpartum, according to a study in the November issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Benefit of BRCA Testing in Ovarian Cancer Examined

THURSDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Testing women with ovarian cancer for the BRCA mutation if they have a personal history of breast cancer, a family history of breast or ovarian cancer, or are of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, is a cost-effective strategy that may prevent cancers in first degree relatives (FDR), according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Most H1N1 Hospitalizations Are in Young Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of hospitalizations for H1N1 influenza are occurring in people younger than 25 years of age, and very few are occurring in the elderly, according to information presented at the Oct. 20 press briefing by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Cost, Efficacy of HPV Vaccine in Older Women Explored

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Giving human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccinations to older women may provide little absolute risk reduction at a high cost, according to a study in the Oct. 20 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Factors Contributing to Autism in Preterm Children Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The higher risk of autistic disorders related to premature birth may be largely due to higher rates of prenatal and neonatal complications, according to research completed in Sweden and published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Childhood Hyperactivity Linked to Shortened Nighttime Sleep

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Children who are not able to sleep through the night are more likely to be hyperactive, with the risk especially high for boys with adverse family living conditions, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

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Sources Find Different Numbers of Active Physicians

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Estimates from U.S. Census Bureau surveys find fewer older physicians remaining active compared with the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile data, according to research published in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cardiovascular Disease Linked to Hip Fracture Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of hip fracture is much higher for people who have a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study among Swedish twins reported in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Role of Antihypertensives in Stable Heart Disease Studied

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with stable ischemic heart disease and preserved ventricular function may benefit from angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, according to a review published online Oct. 20 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Childhood Hypertension Linked to Early Maturation

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Accelerated bone growth may serve as a predictor of primary hypertension in children and adolescents, according to a Polish study published online Oct. 19 in Hypertension.

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Blood Mercury Not Found to Be Elevated in Autism

TUESDAY, Oct. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Blood mercury levels are similar in children with autism or autism spectrum disorder (AU/ASD), non-autism developmental delays (DD) or typically developing (TD) controls, according to the Childhood Autism Risk from Genetics and the Environment study published online Oct. 19 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Study Confirms Benefits of Belt-Positioning Booster Seats

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The use of belt-positioning booster seats in children reduces the risk of injury during a crash as compared to the use of standard seat belts, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in Pediatrics.

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CDC Says New Child Deaths Raise H1N1 Beyond Epidemic

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- As of Oct.16, 11 more children in the United States had died of H1N1 influenza in the past week, elevating the disease above epidemic proportions, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at an Oct. 16 news conference.

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FDA Approves Vaccines for HPV-Related Disease

MONDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- On Oct. 16, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved two vaccines to prevent diseases related to human papillomavirus (HPV) in males and females.

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Paracetamol May Not Be Best for Infant Vaccinations

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Routine use of paracetamol to reduce febrile reactions due to vaccination of infants may not be an optimal approach, as the drug can also reduce the antibody response to several vaccine antigens, according to two consecutive randomized, controlled, open-label studies completed in the Czech Republic and published in the Oct. 17 issue of The Lancet.

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FDA Launches Drug Disposal Advice Web Page

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has launched a new Web page for consumers to educate them on the safe disposal of certain medicines that can be dangerous or even fatal if they end up in the wrong hands.

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Oncologists May Often Fail to Refer for Fertility Counseling

FRIDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Less than half of U.S. oncologists refer their cancer patients of childbearing age for counseling on fertility preservation, according to a study published online Oct. 13 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Excess Weight's Role in Sleep-Disordered Breathing Studied

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Excess body weight may serve as a potentially important predictor of oxygen desaturation severity during sleep disturbances caused by apneas or hypopneas, according to a study in the Oct. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Smoking Bans May Reduce Heart Attacks in Nonsmokers

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking bans may effectively reduce the risk of heart disease and heart attacks attributable to secondhand smoke, according to a report released Oct. 15 by the Institute of Medicine.

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Study Links Text Messages and E-mails to Smoking Cessation

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- While short-term text message mobile phone interventions have been effective, further research needs to be completed to determine whether messages sent over mobile phones can help individuals with smoking cessation over the long term, according to research published online Oct. 7 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Normal-Tension Glaucoma Treatment Options Explored

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Untreated intraocular pressure and zone β variables of peripapillary atrophy may serve as risk factors for normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) in young individuals with moderate to severe vision loss, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Podcasts May Help in Weight Loss Battle

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Using a social cognitive theory-based podcast can help overweight people lose weight, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Study Looks at Enema Benefits in Constipated Children

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Regular enemas may not provide additional benefit to oral laxative regimens used in children with chronic and severe constipation, according to a randomized controlled trial completed in the Netherlands and published in the October issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Interferon Beta Effects Explored in Multiple Sclerosis

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The effects of interferon beta on chemokine receptor genes and chemokine expression in peripheral immune cells may provide the therapeutic effect seen in multiple sclerosis treatment, according to a German study in the October issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Cognitive Factors Preceding Alzheimer's Disease Examined

THURSDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The onset of Alzheimer's disease can be seen on tests for several cognitive factors up to three years prior to clinical diagnosis, according to a study in the October issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Outcomes Studied in Nursing Home Patients With Dementia

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Nursing home residents with advanced dementia have a high mortality rate, and residents with end-stage renal disease who begin dialysis face a high risk of functional decline in the following year, according to two studies in the Oct. 15 New England Journal of Medicine.

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Second-Line Diuretics in Hypertension Reviewed

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of diuretics as a second-line approach to another anti-hypertensive agent further lowers systolic and diastolic blood pressure, providing the same effect as when used as first-line monotherapy, according to a review published online Oct. 7 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Pronation and Supination Compared for Pulled Elbow

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In the treatment of children with pulled elbow, limited evidence suggests that pronation may be a more effective and less painful manipulative intervention than the standard supination method, according to an review published online Oct. 7 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Anesthesia Problems More Likely Early in Academic Year

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Undesirable events are more common among anesthesia trainees at the beginning of the academic year, even in those with more clinical experience, according to research published Oct. 13 in BMJ.

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Study Finds Exercise Reduces Bone Loss During Lactation

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Lactating women who participate in a resistance and aerobic exercise program may experience less bone loss, according to a study published in the October issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

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Breast-Conserving Surgery, Mastectomy Rates Surveyed

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is attempted in the majority of patients, with factors linked to mastectomy including surgeon recommendation, personal decision and failure of BCS, according to results of a survey published in the Oct. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Study Evaluates Hospital Quality and Mortality Rates

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital mortality rates in the United States have improved, although major differences in quality still exist between the best and worst hospitals, according to a report published Oct. 13 by HealthGrades.

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Early AMD May Increase Heart Disease Risk in Older Adults

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults with early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may be at higher risk of coronary heart disease, according to the Cardiovascular Health Study published in the October issue of Ophthalmology.

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Lifestyle Counseling May Help Obese With Weight Loss

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle counseling from a clinical practitioner targeting prevention of weight gain may help overweight and obese individuals lose or maintain their weight, according to the results of a Dutch randomized control trial published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Preoperative Biomarker Levels May Predict Cardiac Events

TUESDAY, Oct. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with high preoperative levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) or N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) may be at a higher risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes within 30 days of non-cardiac surgery, according to a systematic review published in the Oct. 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Drugs for Malaria Prevention in Travelers Compared

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Atovaquone-proguanil and doxycycline appear to be relatively well-tolerated for malaria prophylaxis in travelers, and are less likely to cause neuropsychiatric effects than mefloquine, according to research published online Oct. 7 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Exhalation From Ventilation Masks May Pose Infection Risk

MONDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Leakage of exhaled air from the face masks used for noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) in patients with pneumonia poses a risk of infection for health care workers, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of Chest.

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Cytokines Linked to Knee Pain With Meniscal Injury

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Several inflammatory cytokines may play a role in the pain that develops following meniscal injuries in the knee, according to research published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Health Care Disparities Among States Found to Be Widening

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing health care costs and growing disparities in coverage among U.S. states point to the urgent need for national health care reform, according to an Oct. 8 state-by-state report card from the Commonwealth Fund Commission, a private foundation supporting research on the health care system.

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Oral Vaccine May Help Prevent Endemic Cholera

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- An inexpensive, locally-produced oral cholera vaccine may benefit populations threatened by endemic cholera, according to a double-blind Indian study published online Oct. 9 in The Lancet.

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Organ Donor Family Consent Request Protocols Compared

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Organ donation using collaborative requesting instead of routine requesting by a patient's clinician may not provide increases in consent rates, according to an unblinded, multi-center, randomized controlled trial performed in the United Kingdom published Oct. 8 in BMJ.

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Cardiac Rehabilitation Underused but Beneficial

FRIDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Although cardiac rehabilitation, a medically supervised program to help heart patients recover and improve their functioning, is often not seen as an important component of comprehensive cardiac care and is underused, studies have shown clear benefits, according to a review published online Oct. 8 in Heart.

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Study Explores Thrombus Healing by Plaque Type

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Thrombus healing in sudden cardiac death victims may depend on the presence of plaque ruptures or erosions, and, in some patients, call for different treatment approaches, according to research published online Oct. 7 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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ACS Education May Not Reduce Prehospital Delay

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In patients at high risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS), educational and counseling intervention may not lead to decreased hospital arrival times or increased emergency medical services (EMS) use after the onset of symptoms, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Glatiramer Acetate May Delay Multiple Sclerosis Onset

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Early treatment with glatiramer acetate may delay the start of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS), according to the PreCISe study published online Oct. 7 in The Lancet.

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Seasonal Flu Vaccine Protects Somewhat Against A/H1N1

THURSDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- There are early signs that the 2008/2009 trivalent inactivated seasonal flu vaccination offers some protection against influenza A/H1N1, particularly in its most severe forms, but this should not be taken to mean that vaccination against swine flu is superfluous, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in BMJ.

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Roundtable Discussion Tackles Health Care Reform

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The health care payment system, the role of consumers in responsible health care spending, and the use of comparative-effectiveness research were topics covered in a roundtable discussion with several health economics experts published in the Oct. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Medical Students Want More Practice of Medicine Training

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students in the United States perceive that they are not getting enough training in the practice of medicine, particularly in medical economics, according to a study in the September issue of Academic Medicine.

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Depression, Anxiety May Raise Odds of Obesity

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- There is an association between common mental disorders such as depression and anxiety and the risk of future obesity, according to a study published Oct. 6 in BMJ.

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Wrist Fractures Less Likely Evaluated for Osteoporosis

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Osteoporosis evaluation and management is less common in patients with wrist fractures than in those with hip and spine fractures, according to a national Korean cohort study published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Effectiveness and Cost Help to Make Coverage Decisions

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Countries using evidence-based cost-effectiveness and effectiveness to help make drug coverage decisions show how these factors can successfully support decision making and can also be adapted to the specific conditions of other countries, according to a study in the Oct. 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CYP2D6 Variants Linked With Tamoxifen Response

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with early-stage breast cancer undergoing adjuvant tamoxifen treatment, an association may exist between the polymorphic cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) enzyme and clinical outcomes, according to a retrospective analysis published in the Oct. 7 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Premature Death in China Linked to Hypertension

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated blood pressure is one of the leading preventable risk factors for premature death in China, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in The Lancet.

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Visual Loss Lower in Recently Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetics

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- People diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in more recent years have less prevalence of visual impairment than those diagnosed earlier, according to a study in the October issue of Ophthalmology.

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Low-Contrast Visibility May Be Issue for Parkinson's Drivers

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Drivers with Parkinson's disease may be more prone to poor vehicle control and crashes while driving in low-contrast visibility conditions due to issues with perception, cognition and motor dysfunction, according to a study in the Oct. 6 issue of Neurology.

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Augmentation of Antiemetic Drug Regimen Explored

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of casopitant, a neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor antagonist, to an antiemetic regimen of dexamethasone and ondansetron reduced vomiting and use of rescue medications in breast cancer patients undergoing their first cycle of chemotherapy, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Untreated Sleep Disorder Can Impair Driving Ability

TUESDAY, Oct. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients are more prone to the effects of alcohol consumption and sleep restriction on driving performance than healthy individuals, according to a study in the Oct. 6 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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T'ai Chi Program May Benefit Type 2 Diabetes Patients

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 2 diabetes, t'ai chi may serve as an alternative exercise program to improve glucose control, self-care activities, and quality of life, according to a Korean study published in the June 14 issue of the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine.

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New Guidelines Endorsed for Pediatric Hepatitis B

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- New recommendations seek to improve the screening, monitoring, initial management, and referral of children with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV), according to a special article published online Oct. 5 in Pediatrics.

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Nicotine Replacement in Pregnant Smokers Likely Safe

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Nicotine replacement therapy does not increase the risk of adverse events in pregnant smokers, according to a study in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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HELLP Syndrome Associated With Long-Term Risks

MONDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who develop hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets (HELLP) syndrome have an increased long-term risk of subsequent pregnancy complications and other comorbidities, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Food Habits Studied in Children of Working Parents

FRIDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose mothers work full-time or part-time are more likely to have unhealthy eating habits compared to the offspring of stay-at-home mothers, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Surgical Masks Found to Be Non-Inferior to Respirators

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical masks may be no less effective than N95 respirators in preventing influenza in health care workers, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CDC Says States Not Meeting Fruit and Veggie Objectives

THURSDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In a Sept. 29 press release, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says no U.S. state is currently meeting the national Healthy People 2010 objectives for fruit and vegetable consumption.

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