September 2006 Briefing - Nursing

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for September 2006. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Formula Predicts Fracture Risk Using Bone Density, Falls

TUESDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have developed a fracture risk score, or FRISK, that uses multiple bone mineral density measurements, falls, prior fractures and weight to predict older women's risk of breaking a bone in the near future, according to a study in the September issue of Radiology.

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Many Docs Prescribing New Drugs Fail in Communication

MONDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Only about one-third of physicians prescribing new medications warn patients about possible adverse effects or advise how long to take it, researchers report in the Sept. 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Pharmacy Bar-Code System Cuts Dispensing Errors

FRIDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Scanning all medication doses dispensed by hospital pharmacies using a bar-code system significantly reduces dispensing errors and potentially harmful patient drug reactions, researchers report in the Sept. 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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CDC Urges Routine HIV Testing in Health Care Settings

THURSDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is calling for voluntary, routine HIV testing of patients between ages 13 and 64 in all health care settings. The revised recommendations for HIV testing are published Sept. 22 in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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More Than 1.6 Million Use Therapy for Insomnia

TUESDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- More than 1.6 million U.S. adults use alternative medicine to treat their insomnia or sleep troubles, with a strong association between insomnia and chronic health conditions such as depression, according to a study in the Sept. 18 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Cigarette Smoking Linked to Poor Sleep Patterns

MONDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smoking causes disturbances in sleep that may be reversed by quitting smoking, according to the results of a sleep study published in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology. The authors suggest the disturbances may be due to nicotine or nicotine withdrawal.

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Bagged Spinach Possible Cause of E. coli O157:H7 Outbreak

FRIDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has warned consumers not to eat bagged fresh spinach because it has been linked to an outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 in eight states. The outbreak has affected 50 people so far, causing eight cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome and one death.

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All Intravascular Devices Carry Infection Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- All types of intravascular devices pose some degree of bloodstream infection (BSI) risk, and infection control measures should be broadened beyond current efforts that focus on intensive care units, according to a study in the September issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Few Children Have Repeat Bouts of Strep Throat

TUESDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Only one percent of children between the ages of 4 and 15 have repeated bouts of pharyngitis due to group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus bacteria, researchers report in the September issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Nicotine Slows Healing of Rat Shoulder Tendons

MONDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to nicotine can delay healing in rats that have undergone shoulder tendon surgery, which may have implications for humans undergoing rotator cuff injury repair, researchers report in the September issue of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

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High Viral Load, Cytokines Linked to Fatal H5N1 Infections

MONDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals infected with the H5N1 strain of the influenza A virus have high viral loads and an intense inflammatory cytokine response, suggesting the importance of early diagnosis and effective treatment, according to study results published online Sept. 10 in Nature Medicine.

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MRI Suggests Comatose Woman Hears Commands

THURSDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A brain imaging analysis suggests that an unconscious woman -- in a vegetative state because of a traumatic brain injury -- may understand and respond to certain verbal commands, according to a brief case report in the Sept. 8 issue of Science.

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Avian Flu Vaccine Safe and Effective in Clinical Trial

THURSDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A phase I trial of an H5N1 influenza vaccine shows that low doses of vaccine are safe and can induce antibody responses in up to 78 percent of subjects, according to a study published online Sept. 7 in The Lancet.

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Over 100 Million Flu Shots Available in U.S. This Season

THURSDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- There will be more than 100 million doses of influenza vaccine available this year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Almost all of the vaccines are due to be shipped and distributed in October and November. Vaccine manufacturers and distributors have been working with the CDC and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to increase supply and distribute the vaccine doses early.

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Residents' Errors Cause Them Significant Distress

TUESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Self-perceived medical errors are common among internal medicine residents, can cause them significant personal distress and decreased empathy, and can lead to more self-perceived errors and distress in the future, according to a report in the Sept. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Medical School Enrollment Efforts Boost Minority Students

TUESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The University of California's efforts to boost medical school enrollment of minority and disadvantaged students by using postbaccalaureate premedical programs is increasing participation by these groups, researchers report in the Sept. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Long Work Hours Linked to Injuries in Residents

TUESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Medical residents continue to work long hours in the clinic and the practice often results in serious mistakes that affect both resident and patient health, according to two reports the Sept. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Teen Crashes Drop After Calif. Graduated License Law

TUESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- California's 16-year-old drivers got involved in 23 percent fewer car crashes causing death and injury after the state's graduated licensing law took effect in 1998, according to a new analysis released Aug. 31 by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. An earlier study found no drop in teen crashes under the new law.

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Physician's Briefing

Updated on June 12, 2022

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