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September 2008 Briefing - Nursing

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for September 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

News Media Under-Report Drug Company Funding of Research

TUESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Reports on medication research published in general news media often fail to disclose that the research received pharmaceutical company funding and frequently refer to drugs by brand name rather than using the generic name, according to an article published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Reduced Dosing Schedule Acceptable for Anthrax Vaccine

TUESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- A three-dose intramuscular (3-IM) regimen of anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA) achieves a similar serological response compared to a four-dose intramuscular (4-IM) or subcutaneous (4-SQ) regimen, and fewer injection site adverse effects are seen with IM administration, according to a report in the Oct. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association .

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Flu Vaccination Rises in Adults But Still Low in Children

MONDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- During the 2006-2007 flu season, influenza vaccination coverage increased among adults, but only one in five children aged 6 months to 23 months were fully vaccinated, according to two reports from researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Britain's Breast-Feeding Promotion Efforts Are Failing

FRIDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The U.K. health care system is failing to encourage women to breast-feed, and a national breast-feeding promotion strategy is urgently required if breast-feeding rates are to improve, according to an editorial published online Sept. 25 in BMJ.

Editorial

Community-Based Education Can Halve Neonatal Mortality

FRIDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A community-based behavior modification program was able to reduce neonatal mortality by more than half in a rural setting in India, researchers report in the Sept. 27 issue of The Lancet.

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Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators Re-Examined

THURSDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- There is a compelling rationale for clinicians to critically analyze evidence-based guidelines when using implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) for the prevention of sudden cardiac death, according to a report published in the Sept. 30 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Bisphosphonate Infusion Linked to Ocular Complication

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians should be aware that bisphosphonate infusions can result in a serious but rare complication: orbital inflammatory disease, according to a case study published in the Sept. 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Nurse Manager's Leadership Style May Affect Staff Retention

TUESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department nurse managers who adopt a Transformational leadership style may be able to reduce staff turnover, according to the results of a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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No Racial or Gender Bias in Time to Electrocardiogram

TUESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Among chest pain cases presenting at hospital emergency departments, there are no racial or gender disparities in terms of time from admission to electrocardiogram (EKG), but patients over the age of 60 tend to be tested more promptly than their younger counterparts, according to a report published in the October issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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No Change to 2009 Part B Medicare Premium

MONDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- There will be no change to the Part B Standard Medicare premium in 2009 compared with 2008. This is the first time since 2000 that the premium has not risen over the prior year, according to an announcement by the Department of Health and Human Services' Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

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Call for Expansion of Congenital Disorders Screening

FRIDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Screening all newborns for a panel of 29 disorders recommended by the American College of Medical Genetics would help detect significantly more children with rare disorders, according to a report published in the Sept. 19 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Physician's Office Hours Affect Time to Stroke Treatment

FRIDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- People who experience a transient ischemic attack or a minor stroke outside their primary physician's office hours wait longer before seeking treatment than those who have a stroke during general practice opening hours, according to a report published online Sept. 18 in BMJ.

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Hepatitis B Screening Recommendations Expanded

FRIDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- New recommendations have been issued regarding screening for chronic hepatitis B, according to a report released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published in the Sept. 19 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Antibiotic Resistance Has Become a Global Pandemic

FRIDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A concerted international and national response, behavior change by consumers and providers, and the development of antibacterial agents are all urgently needed to tackle the global problem of rapidly increasing antibiotic resistance, according to an article published online Sept. 18 in BMJ.

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History, Physical Exam Provide Accurate Cardiac Estimates

THURSDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Estimates of hemodynamic parameters from a history and physical exam are largely accurate and can predict death or rehospitalization in patients with advanced heart failure, according to study findings published in the September issue of Circulation: Heart Failure.

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Timing of C-Section Perioperative Antibiotics Compared

THURSDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Preoperative antibiotics significantly reduce postpartum endometritis compared to antibiotics given at cord clamping, but do not affect neonatal outcomes, according to research published in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Dermatology Residencies Need More Skin of Color Training

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Dermatology residents in the United States receive relatively little training in treating skin of color, which needs to be improved given that about 48 percent of the U.S. population will be non-white by 2050, according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Healthy Middle-Age Lifestyle Halves Women's Risk of Death

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged women who avoid smoking, maintain a healthy body weight, get regular exercise and eat a diet low in red meat and trans-fats can reduce their risk of premature death by more than half, according to study findings published online Sept. 16 in BMJ.

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Maternal Vaccine Reduces Influenza in Infants

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The use of influenza vaccine in pregnant women can decrease the risk of influenza in their infants up to six months of age and offer protection against febrile respiratory illness in both mothers and infants, according to research published online Sept. 17 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Day of Discharge Doesn't Affect Guideline Compliance

MONDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Staff adherence to guideline recommendations when treating patients hospitalized with acute coronary syndrome is not affected by day of discharge (weekday versus weekend), researchers report in the Sept. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Maternal Factors Linked to Likelihood of Spanking

FRIDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers with depression or exposure to partner violence are more likely to spank their children, according to research published online Sept. 11 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Community Participation Key to Maternal and Child Health

FRIDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Community participation is vital for the successful delivery of maternal, newborn and child health, according to three articles published in the Sept. 13 issue of The Lancet, which has a special focus on the legacy of the 1978 International Conference on Primary Health Care in Alma-Ata.

Abstract - Rosato
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Abstract - Bhutta
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Chronic Disease Is Heavy Burden in Developing World

FRIDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Although many countries have made significant progress in reducing mortality, the burden of chronic and non-communicable disease remains heavy and requires integrated strategies to tackle it, according to three papers published in the Sept. 13 issue of The Lancet, which has a special focus on the legacy of the 1978 International Conference on Primary Health Care in Alma-Ata.

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Abstract - Lawn
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Primary Care Offers Lifeline to Global Health

FRIDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Achieving the Millennium Development Goals requires a renewed commitment to primary health care, while training health care workers and developing meaningful measures of progress are of key importance, according to three papers published in the Sept. 13 issue of The Lancet, which has a special focus on the legacy of the 1978 International Conference on Primary Health Care in Alma-Ata.

Abstract - Huicho
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Smoking Cessation Services Fail to Attract Young People

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking cessation services fail to attract young people and have only a modest impact on smoking behavior among the young, according to an editorial published online Sept. 10 in BMJ.

Editorial

Internet-Based Health Profession Education Not Superior

TUESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Internet-based education significantly improves outcomes in comparison to no intervention, but results are inconsistent when comparing Internet-based education to non-Internet educational programs, according to a report in the Sept. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Nurse-Led Primary Care Remains Controversial

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Nurse-led primary health care is the logical conclusion to a trend already well under way, according to a Head to Head article published online Sept. 4 in BMJ, while a companion article argues that nurse-led primary care would restrict patients' choice and would be a backward step.

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Patterns of Non-Family Infant Abductions Are Changing

FRIDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The profile of non-family infant abductions is changing, with fewer babies being taken from hospitals and more from homes and public places, according to a report published in the September issue of the American Journal of Nursing.

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Ibuprofen First Reduces Fever in Children for Longer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- When treating children for fever, ibuprofen is more effective than paracetamol (acetaminophen) in terms of the time without fever within the first four hours of treatment, while a combination of both drugs works best over the first 24 hours, according to research published Sept. 2 in BMJ Online First.

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Unhealthy Snacks Continue to Be Sold in US Schools

MONDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Public secondary schools continue to offer snacks and beverages that compete with more healthy U.S. Department of Agriculture school meal program items, despite recommendations from the Institute of Medicine to restrict the availability of unhealthy competitive foods in schools, according to an article published in the Aug. 29 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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