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October 2014 Briefing - OBGYN & Women's Health

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for October 2014. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Generic Meds May Help Breast Cancer Patients Stick to Therapy

FRIDAY, Oct. 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Access to generic aromatase inhibitors (AIs) improves the chances that breast cancer patients will stick with their drug treatment, according to research published in the November issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Almost One in Five Americans Plagued by Constant Pain

FRIDAY, Oct. 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Almost one-fifth of Americans suffer from chronic pain, a large new survey reveals, with the elderly and women suffering the most. The findings were published in the October issue of the Journal of Pain.

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Cinnamon May Improve Menstrual Cyclicity in PCOS

FRIDAY, Oct. 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), cinnamon supplements may improve menstrual cyclicity, according to a study published in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Docs Face Challenges Treating HPV Oropharyngeal CA Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 31, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Key challenges have been identified for health professionals communicating the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (OSCC), according to a study published online Oct. 28 in Head & Neck.

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Brain Scans Yield Clues to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

THURSDAY, Oct. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There are clear differences in the brains of people with chronic fatigue syndrome and the brains of non-affected people, new research indicates. In the study, published online Oct. 29 in Radiology, patients with chronic fatigue syndrome had less overall white matter than the people who didn't have the condition.

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Fewer Malpractice Claims Paid in the United States

THURSDAY, Oct. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The number of medical malpractice payments in the United States has dropped sharply since 2002, according to a new study. And compensation payment amounts and liability insurance costs for many doctors declined in recent years. These findings were published online Oct. 30 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Review: Lower IQ With Prenatal Exposure to Sodium Valproate

THURSDAY, Oct. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal exposure to sodium valproate (VPA) is associated with a reduction in offspring IQ, according to a review published online Oct. 30 in The Cochrane Library.

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Stroke Prevention Guidelines Re-Emphasize Healthy Lifestyle

THURSDAY, Oct. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New guidelines from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association reinforce the idea that a healthy lifestyle is key to the primary prevention of stroke. The guidelines were published online Oct. 29 in Stroke.

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Would Alternative Payment Plan Cut Medical Bills?

THURSDAY, Oct. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New research supports replacing the traditional way of reimbursing doctors for care -- paying for each service provided -- with an alternative system that gives a set amount of money to health care organizations for patient care. The study was published in the Oct. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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AMA Code of Ethics Offers Guidance for Physicians

THURSDAY, Oct. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The American Medical Association (AMA) Code of Ethics and other articles provide guidance for physicians in relation to public health emergencies, according to a report from the AMA.

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Voters' Views on Affordable Care Act Split Along Party Lines

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Americans' opinions about the Affordable Care Act (ACA) are sharply divided along political lines, according to research published online Oct. 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine. The findings come from 27 public opinion polls conducted by 14 organizations.

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High Milk Intake Linked to Increased Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Men and women who drink three glasses of milk or more every day may have a higher mortality risk than those who drink less than one glass per day, according to new research published online Oct. 28 in The BMJ.

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Plastics' Chemical May Affect Boys' Genital Development

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Boys born to mothers with greater exposure to the chemical di-isononyl phthalate (DiNP) may have a shorter anogenital distance, according to a new study. The researchers said their findings, published online Oct. 29 in Environmental Health Perspectives, add to concerns about the possible effects of certain plasticizers on the male reproductive system.

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After Breast Cancer, Depression Risk Lingers

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women who survive breast cancer face a higher risk of depression that can linger and require antidepressants, according to a new study published online Oct. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Vitamin D May Not Prevent Return of Vaginosis After All

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new study suggests that high doses of vitamin D may not help prevent the return of bacterial vaginosis (BV). The research was published in the November issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

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Less Competition Among Docs = Higher Medical Costs

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Competition between medical practices helps keep health care costs lower, according to a study published in the Oct. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Women Less Likely to Get Hemodialysis Than Men in ESRD

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women aren't treated with dialysis as often as men when they have end-stage renal disease, according to research published Oct. 28 in PLOS Medicine.

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Mammography + Tomosynthesis Cost-Effective for Dense Breasts

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Combined biennial digital mammography and tomosynthesis screening is effective for women with dense breasts, according to a study published online Oct. 28 in Radiology.

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Noneconomic Damages Caps Cut Malpractice Payments by 15%

TUESDAY, Oct. 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Adoption of noneconomic damages caps reduces average malpractice payments by 15 percent, according to research published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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USPSTF: More Evidence Needed for Thyroid Screening

TUESDAY, Oct. 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has concluded that there is currently insufficient evidence to assess the benefits and harms of thyroid screening. These findings form the basis of a draft recommendation statement based on an evidence review published online Oct. 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Better Radiologist Performance on Own Recalled Screens

TUESDAY, Oct. 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Radiologists' screening performance improves with work-up of their own recalled screening mammograms, according to a study published in the November issue of Radiology.

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Congenital CMV Causes >10 Percent of Hearing-Loss Cases

TUESDAY, Oct. 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More than 10 percent of infants with congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) will suffer permanent hearing loss, according to new research published online Oct. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Cadavers Beat Computers As Med School Teaching Tool

MONDAY, Oct. 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Cadavers are better than a computer simulation of the human body for teaching anatomy to college students, according to research published in the September/October issue of Anatomical Sciences Education.

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New York, New Jersey Ease Ebola Quarantines

MONDAY, Oct. 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Faced with pressure from the White House and criticism from infectious disease experts, the governors of New York and New Jersey have eased their quarantine measures that required all medical workers returning from West Africa who had contact with Ebola patients to be forced into isolation.

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CDC Issues Revised Interim U.S. Guidance on Ebola

MONDAY, Oct. 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Today, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a revision of their Ebola guideline document -- Interim Guidance for Monitoring and Movement of Persons with Ebola Virus Disease Exposure.

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More Kids Harmed by Drinking in Pregnancy Than Expected

MONDAY, Oct. 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- As many as one in 20 U.S. children may have health or behavioral problems related to alcohol exposure before birth, according to new research published online Oct. 27 in Pediatrics.

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Knowing Genetic Risk of Cancer Doesn't Change Behavior

MONDAY, Oct. 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Knowledge of genetic colorectal cancer (CRC) risk does not influence screening behavior, according to research published in the Oct. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Healthy Lifestyle Independently Tied to Lower CHF Risk in Women

MONDAY, Oct. 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Living a healthy lifestyle may decrease the risk of heart failure among women, even in the absence of antecedent coronary heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes, according to research published in the Oct. 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Breast Cancer Markers Commonly Used for Routine Surveillance

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer tumor markers are frequently used for routine surveillance in nonmetastatic breast cancer, and their use has been found to increase the number of diagnostic procedures performed as well as the total cost of care, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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NT-proBNP Modestly Improves CVD Risk Prediction in Women

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) modestly improves cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk prediction for women, according to a study published in the Oct. 28 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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New York City Health Officials Confirm First Ebola Case

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New York City health officials said Thursday that a health care worker who recently returned from West Africa has tested positive for Ebola. The patient, identified as Craig Spencer, M.D., by city officials, had been working with Doctors Without Borders helping to treat Ebola patients in Guinea, one of three West Africa countries hit hard by the disease.

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Airborne Transmission of Ebola Highly Unlikely

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People face no threat of airborne transmission of Ebola, according to a panel of Ebola experts gathered by the New England Journal of Medicine for an issue briefing Wednesday.

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Coworker Response 'Crucial' in Workplace Bullying Resolution

THURSDAY, Oct. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Targets of workplace bullying can offer chaos, report, or quest narratives about their experiences, and coworker response plays a role in narrative development, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in Management Communication Quarterly.

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Weight-Loss Surgery May Raise Risk of Severe Headaches

THURSDAY, Oct. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- After weight-loss surgery, some patients may be at risk for developing severe headaches, a new study suggests. The report was published online Oct. 22 in Neurology.

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U.S. Ranks Last Among Wealthy Nations in Health Care Access

THURSDAY, Oct. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. health care system ranks last compared to other industrialized nations when it comes to affordability and patient access, according to a new survey published in the Oct. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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U.S. Diets Still Contain Too Many Trans, Saturated Fats

THURSDAY, Oct. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Over the last three decades, Americans have cut their intake of saturated and trans fats -- but not enough, according to research published online Oct. 22 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Americans Report Distrust of Medical Profession

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Americans are less trusting of the medical profession than people in many other countries -- even though they often like their own doctor, according to a new report. The findings were published in the Oct. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Recalled Supplements Linger on U.S. Store Shelves

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Two-thirds of dietary supplements recalled by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration because they contained banned ingredients remained on store shelves at least six months after they were recalled, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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U.S. Residents Back From Ebola-Affected Areas to Be Tracked

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Public health officials plan to actively monitor all U.S. residents returning home from one of the three Ebola-affected nations in West Africa, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Wednesday.

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Drinking Sugary Sodas May Promote Aging at Cellular Level

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking sugar-sweetened sodas may affect cellular aging by shortening telomere length, according to research published online Oct. 16 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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APIC Provides Resources for Ebola Management

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Resources are available to increase protection against Ebola transmission, according to a report from the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

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Hospital Conversion to For-Profit Status Ups Financial Margins

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital conversion to for-profit status is associated with improvements in financial margins, but has no effect on process quality metrics or mortality rates, according to a study published in the Oct. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Drug Coupons Shrink Patients' Costs Considerably

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Drug coupons could reduce patients' out-of-pocket costs by 60 percent, according to a study published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Eating Disorders Linked to Adverse Perinatal Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal eating disorders are associated with adverse pregnancy, obstetric, and perinatal health outcomes, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Hospice Doesn't Offset Intensive End-of-Life Ovarian Cancer Care

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing use of hospice in the final days of ovarian cancer does not offset intensive end-of-life care in older women, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Price Transparency Platform Linked to Lower Claims Payments

TUESDAY, Oct. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Access to an employer-sponsored private price transparency platform is associated with reduced total claims payments, according to research published in the Oct. 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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CDC: 'Think Ebola' and 'Care Carefully'

TUESDAY, Oct. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued updated guidelines for the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) by health care workers when caring for patients with Ebola, along with a reminder to health care workers to "Think Ebola" and to "Care Carefully."

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Twice-Yearly Doctor Visits Help Control Hypertension

TUESDAY, Oct. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Twice-yearly visits to the doctor can help keep hypertension under control better than only seeing the doctor once a year, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in Circulation.

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Review: Many Common Symptoms Unrelated to Disease

TUESDAY, Oct. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- At least one-third of common symptoms have no disease-related explanation, according to a narrative review published in the Oct. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Law Requiring Release of Health Information Upheld

TUESDAY, Oct. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A state law that requires plaintiffs to release relevant protected health information before proceeding with allegations of medical liability has been upheld by a federal appeals court, according to the American Medical Association (AMA).

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Sustainable Benefit Seen for Trastuzumab in Breast Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Adding a year of trastuzumab (Herceptin) to standard chemotherapy improves overall survival by 37 percent and raises 10-year overall survival rates from 75 to 84 percent, according to research published online Oct. 20 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Circumcision Past Newborn Stage Poses Risk for Boys

MONDAY, Oct. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- About 6 percent of U.S. boys are circumcised later than the first days or weeks of life, which increases costs and risks, according to new research published online Oct. 20 in Pediatrics.

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Viewpoint: Getting United States Prepared for Ebola Outbreak

MONDAY, Oct. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A case of delayed Ebola diagnosis in Dallas and subsequent infection of health care workers has highlighted the lack of preparedness for a U.S. outbreak of the disease, according to a viewpoint piece published online Oct. 17 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Dutch Guidelines Do Not Cut Incidence of Group B Strep

MONDAY, Oct. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Dutch guidelines, implemented in 1999, do not appear to be effective for reducing the incidence of invasive group B streptococcal disease in newborns, according to a study published in the November issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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New MCAT Shifts Focus, Will Include Humanities

MONDAY, Oct. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) has been revised, and the latest changes, including more humanities such as social sciences, are due to be implemented next April, according to a report from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

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Two-Pronged Program Looks Best for Helping Smokers Quit

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of counseling and medication greatly increases smokers' chances of quitting, according to new research published in the October issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Is 'Slow and Steady' Weight Loss Really the Best Approach?

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An Australian study casts doubt on the notion that a more gradual approach to weight loss is always the most effective route to take. The findings were published online Oct. 16 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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Volume of Patient-to-Doc E-mails Up From 2001 to 2010

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- From 2001 to 2010 the volume of patient-to-physician electronic messages increased, but the rate per-capita stabilized, according to research published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Obama Appoints Ron Klain As 'Ebola Czar'

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- President Barack Obama on Friday appointed Ron Klain, a former chief of staff to Vice President Joe Biden, as Ebola "czar" to oversee the federal government's response to the presence of virus in the United States.

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Specialized Care Centers May Be Needed to Contain Ebola

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Specialized medical centers may be necessary to adequately treat and contain the Ebola virus in the United States, according to an ideas and opinions piece published online Oct. 16 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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70-Gene Signature Not Cost-Effective in Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with node-negative breast cancer (NNBC), the 70-gene signature is unlikely to be cost-effective for guiding adjuvant chemotherapy decision making, according to a study published online Oct. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Years of Endurance Exercise May Raise A-Fib/Flutter Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Cumulative years of regular endurance exercise are associated with an increased risk for atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Many Docs Believe Mobile Health Apps Can Improve Patient Care

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A Manhattan Research survey recently found that many physicians believe digital communication technologies, including mobile apps, can be used to improve patient outcomes, according to an article published Oct. 8 in Medical Economics.

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Spotting May Be Endometriosis Marker for Women With Infertility

FRIDAY, Oct. 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Premenstrual spotting for two or more days is associated with endometriosis in women with infertility, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Polyunsaturated Fats Mitigate Damage Tied to Weight Gain

THURSDAY, Oct. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- When gaining weight, polyunsaturated fats appear to be less detrimental to cardiovascular health than saturated fats, according to research published online Oct. 15 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Getting an Appointment With a Psychiatrist Often Difficult

THURSDAY, Oct. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Residents of major U.S. metropolitan areas who need a psychiatrist are often likely to have difficulty securing an appointment, regardless of ability to pay, according to research published online Oct. 15 in Psychiatric Services.

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Limiting Malpractice Claims May Not Curb Costly Medical Tests

THURSDAY, Oct. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Malpractice reform may not keep physicians from ordering unnecessary and expensive tests, according to a study published in the Oct. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Ebola Workshop Scheduled for Nov. 3 in Washington, D.C.

THURSDAY, Oct. 16, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- At the request of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council will host a workshop to discuss research needed to prepare for handling the occurrence of Ebola virus disease in the United States, according to a press release from the National Academies.

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IBD Linked to Worse Prognosis After Myocardial Infarction

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients after first-time myocardial infarction (MI), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with worse prognosis, according to a study published online Oct. 14 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Change in Doc, Public Attitudes Needed to Cut Overtreatment

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Reform of malpractice laws as well as inclusion of patients in medical decision making may help reduce overdiagnosis and overtreatment, according to an article published online Oct. 14 in The BMJ.

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Facebook, Apple Offer Workers Coverage for Egg Freezing

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Apple and Facebook will pay for female employees to freeze their eggs, making them the first major employers to offer this benefit for non-medical reasons.

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CDC Takes Steps Toward Hospital Preparedness for Ebola

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has sent new resources to Dallas to support the highest standard of infection control, according to a news release issued by the organization Tuesday.

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Quality Indicators Not Tied to Maternal, Neonatal Morbidity

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital-level perinatal indicators (elective delivery before 39 weeks and cesarean delivery) are not significantly associated with maternal or neonatal morbidity, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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FDA: Weak Evidence for Removing Chantix Warning

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There is little evidence to support removing a black box warning about suicide risk from the prescription anti-smoking drug Chantix, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

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Second Health Care Worker in Dallas Tests Positive for Ebola

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A second health care worker who helped treat a patient who died of Ebola last week at a Dallas hospital has tested positive for the disease, health officials said Wednesday morning.

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FDA Approves Urinary Prosthetic Device for Women

TUESDAY, Oct. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A device to help women with impaired detrusor contractility (IDC) urinate has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Resident Proficiency in High-Value Care Is Hard to Test

TUESDAY, Oct. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The high-value care (HVC) subscore on the Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (IM-ITE) helps assess resident knowledge of HVC, but additional tools are needed to measure proficiency in practice, according to research published online Oct. 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Mental Stress Affects Heart Differently in Men, Women

TUESDAY, Oct. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There are clear, measurable physical differences from mental stress in men and women, according to a study published in the Oct. 21 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Sudden Cardiac Death a Risk for Women Living Near Major Roads

TUESDAY, Oct. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women who live near major roads may be at increased risk for sudden cardiac death, according to a new study published online Oct. 13 in Circulation.

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Smoking-Related Illnesses in U.S. Total 14 Million

TUESDAY, Oct. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smoking accounts for approximately 14 million major medical conditions that plague the lives of U.S. adults, according to a new government report published online Oct. 13 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Obesity Appears to Speed Aging of the Liver

TUESDAY, Oct. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Extra pounds cause the liver to age faster, potentially explaining why obesity is linked to diseases like liver cancer and insulin resistance, new research suggests. The study appears online Oct. 13 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Health Officials Reviewing Ebola Procedures at Dallas Hospital

MONDAY, Oct. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Federal and local health officials said Monday that they were re-examining infection-control efforts at the Dallas hospital where a nurse contracted Ebola while caring for America's first diagnosed victim of the deadly disease.

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Sleeping on Sofa Can Be Deadly for Babies

MONDAY, Oct. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Of nearly 8,000 infant sleeping deaths in the United States, about 12 percent were sofa-related, with nearly three-quarters of the deaths occurring in newborns, according to research published online Oct. 13 in Pediatrics.

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Texas Hospital Worker Tests Positive for Ebola

MONDAY, Oct. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A health care worker who helped treat the Liberian man who died of Ebola in a Dallas hospital last week has tested positive for the virus, public health officials reported Sunday.

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Love Your Coffee? You May Have Been Born That Way

MONDAY, Oct. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People who consume large amounts of coffee may have genetics to thank for their cravings, according to a study published online Oct. 7 in Molecular Psychiatry.

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Combining Healthy Habits Equals Greater Reduction in CRC Risk

MONDAY, Oct. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A few healthy habits could reduce the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), according to a study published online Oct. 10 in BMC Medicine.

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FDA: Akynzeo Approved for Chemo-Related Nausea/Vomiting

FRIDAY, Oct. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The combination drug Akynzeo (netupitant and palonosetron) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat nausea and vomiting among people undergoing chemotherapy, the agency said Friday in a news release.

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Even Decaf Coffee May Help Protect the Liver

FRIDAY, Oct. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Prior research has suggested that drinking coffee may help protect the liver, but new findings indicate caffeine might not be the active ingredient at work. The study was published online recently in Hepatology.

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Medicines Are Biggest Culprit in Fatal Allergic Reactions

FRIDAY, Oct. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Over half of allergy-related deaths are caused by medications, while less than 7 percent are caused by food allergies, according to research published online Sept. 30 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Americans Increasingly Anxious About Ebola

FRIDAY, Oct. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- One-quarter of Americans now view Ebola as a major public health threat to the United States, with many saying they'd change their travel plans due to Ebola fears, a new Harris Poll/HealthDay survey reveals.

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Specialty Drugs May Be Worth the Higher Costs

FRIDAY, Oct. 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Despite high costs, specialty drugs may provide value that balances the price difference compared with traditional drugs, according to research published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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AAFP Expresses Support for Bill Aiding Doc Re-Entry Into Practice

THURSDAY, Oct. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) has expressed its support for proposed legislation designed to help primary care physicians return to clinical practice after a period away from patient care.

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Five Healthy Lifestyle Choices Cut Women's Stroke Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women who follow five healthy habits can cut their stroke risk in half, new research suggests. The study was published online Oct. 8 in Neurology.

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Timing of Epidural May Be Best Left Up to Expectant Mother

THURSDAY, Oct. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The best time to give an epidural is likely when a woman asks for it, although the effect of early epidural on the length of time to reach full cervical dilation is unclear, according to a review published online Oct. 9 in The Cochrane Library.

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Five Major U.S. Airports to Screen Travelers for Ebola

THURSDAY, Oct. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Five major U.S. airports will begin screening travelers entering the country from the three West African nations hit hardest by the ongoing Ebola epidemic, federal health officials announced Wednesday.

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High-Intensity Ultrasound OK for Cesarean Scar Pregnancy

THURSDAY, Oct. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can play a role in treating cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP), according to a small study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Reducing Residency Work Hours Doesn't Affect Patient Outcomes

THURSDAY, Oct. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Duty-hour reforms have not adversely affected hospital mortality or length-of-stay of patients cared for by new attending physicians who were partly or fully exposed to reduced duty hours during residency, according to research published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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Modified ACR Criteria Effective for Fibromyalgia Diagnosis

THURSDAY, Oct. 9, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The 2011 modification of the 2010 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) preliminary criteria for the diagnosis of fibromyalgia (2011ModCr) has acceptable diagnostic accuracy compared with the 1990 ACR criteria, according to research published in the September issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Risk of Upper GI Bleeding Varies for Drug Combinations

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Concomitant use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), low-dose aspirin or cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selective inhibitors with other drugs can increase the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), and the magnitude of interaction varies according to drug combination, according to a study published in the October issue of Gastroenterology.

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Dallas Ebola Patient Has Died, Hospital Officials Confirm

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian national who was the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, died Wednesday morning at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas.

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Laxative Type Might Influence Colorectal Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The type of laxative a person takes might be a factor in their odds for colorectal cancer, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

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CDC: U.S. Life Expectancy Hits Record High of Nearly 79 Years

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Average life expectancy in the United States reached an all-time high of 78.8 years in 2012, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Wednesday. For people 65 years old in 2012, life expectancy was an additional 19.3 years, up slightly from the year before. Women age 65 and older in 2012 can expect to live another 20.5 years, while men may get around an additional 18 years.

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Tobacco Tied to Higher Risk of Oral HPV Infection

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Tobacco use in any form appears to be linked to an increased risk of infection with oral human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16), according to a research letter published in the Oct. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on infectious disease.

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Ovarian Cancer DNA Detected in Vaginal Fluid

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have found it's possible to detect ovarian cancer gene mutations in vaginal fluid samples -- a finding they hope is a step toward an effective screening test for the disease. The findings were published online Oct. 6 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Women Have Greater Atheroma Regression With Statins

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with coronary atheroma, high-intensity statin treatment is associated with greater regression in women than men, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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AAFP Urges Docs to Check Accuracy of Open Payments Data

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) urges family doctors to check the accuracy of the first set of data published by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Open Payments transparency program.

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Tips Provided for Maximizing Use of Patient Portals

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Patient portals should be designed to meet patient priorities and promoted in order to maximize their use and boost practice efficiency, according to an article published Oct. 1 in Medical Economics.

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Methodology Addresses 'Awakenings' Under Anesthesia

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 8, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- New methodology can be used to examine the incidence, predisposing factors, causality, and impact of accidental awareness during general anesthesia, according to research published in the October issue of the British Journal of Anaesthesia.

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Cancer Diagnosis Can Take Toll on Mental Health

TUESDAY, Oct. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- One out of three people diagnosed with cancer also wind up struggling with a mental health disorder such as anxiety or depression, according to a German study published online Oct. 6 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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About Half of All U.S. Hospital Patients Receive Antibiotics

TUESDAY, Oct. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- About half of all U.S. hospital patients receive antibiotics, and these drugs are commonly the ones more likely to promote the growth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, according to a new study, led by researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and published in the Oct. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on infectious disease. The CDC also funded the study.

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Fetal BPA Exposure to Tied to Childhood Wheeze

TUESDAY, Oct. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure in pregnancy to bisphenol A (BPA) may increase a child's risk of respiratory issues, researchers say. The findings, published online Oct. 6 in JAMA Pediatrics, indicate that for every 10-fold increase in the average amount of BPA in the mothers' urine, there is a nearly 55 percent increase in the odds of some type of wheezing in their children.

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Review: Physical Activity in Pregnancy Cuts Cesarean Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity in pregnancy is associated with a reduction in the risk of cesarean delivery, according to a review published in the October issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Docs More Likely to Prescribe Unneeded Antibiotics Later in Day

TUESDAY, Oct. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors are more likely to prescribe unnecessary antibiotics for respiratory infections as the day progresses, according to a research letter published online Oct. 6 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Obama Considers Tighter Ebola Screening for Travelers

TUESDAY, Oct. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- President Barack Obama said Monday that his administration is preparing additional screening measures to prevent the Ebola epidemic in West Africa from gaining a foothold in the United States.

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Undiagnosed Hypertension More Likely in Rheumatoid Arthritis

TUESDAY, Oct. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients meeting guideline-based criteria for hypertension, those with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are less likely to receive a diagnosis of hypertension, according to a study published in the September issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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USPSTF Recommends T2DM Screening for At-Risk Adults

TUESDAY, Oct. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for abnormal blood glucose and type 2 diabetes in adults at increased risk (Grade B recommendation). This draft recommendation statement is based on an evidence review published by the USPSTF.

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Factors Identified That Influence Overuse of Pap Testing

TUESDAY, Oct. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Demographic variables associated with overuse of Papanicolaou (Pap) testing have been identified, according to research published online Sept. 4 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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CDC Team Assisting Ebola Response in Dallas

MONDAY, Oct. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Experts from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have arrived in Texas and are working closely with Texas state and local health departments to investigate the first Ebola case in the United States, according to a news release issued by the agency.

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Chasm Exists Between Cultural, Medical Definitions of Obesity

MONDAY, Oct. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Cultural definitions of body size terms differ from a participant's actual body size, according to a study published in the September-October issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

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Gout Independently Associated With Diabetes Risk

MONDAY, Oct. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Gout appears to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, especially in women, according to a study published online Oct. 2 in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

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States Encouraged to Use Physician Assistant Workforce

MONDAY, Oct. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Physician assistants (PAs) have an important role in the provision of health care and their role should be encouraged by appropriate state legislation, according to a report from the National Governors Association.

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Impact of Physician Payments Sunshine Act Discussed

MONDAY, Oct. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The Physician Payments Sunshine Act is causing concern for manufacturers and providers, as well as physicians, according to a health policy brief published online Oct. 2 in Health Affairs.

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Study Clarifies LMWH Treatment for Cancer-Related DVT

MONDAY, Oct. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Results of a randomized trial support the role of residual vein thrombosis (RVT) as a factor in determining the optimal duration of anticoagulant therapy in cancer patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the lower limbs. These findings were published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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CHD Risk in Diabetes Correlates With BMI Seven Years Earlier

MONDAY, Oct. 6, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) over seven years increases with higher body mass index (BMI) at baseline among patients with diabetes, with a U-shaped association between BMI at the last visit and the risk of CHD among women, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in Diabetes Care.

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Physician Payments Found Not to Favor Procedures

FRIDAY, Oct. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Physician Fee Schedule does not systematically provide higher valuation of physician work per unit time for procedure/test codes than for evaluation and management (E/M) codes, according to a study published online Sept. 18 in the Annals of Surgery.

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Experts Say Testosterone Rx Not Appropriate for Healthy Women

FRIDAY, Oct. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy women should not be diagnosed with testosterone deficiency and should not be prescribed testosterone therapy, a new guideline from the Endocrine Society states. The new clinical practice guideline was published online Oct. 3 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

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Too Much Alcohol May Harm Sperm

FRIDAY, Oct. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The more alcohol young men drink, the lower their sperm count and quality may be, according to a study published Oct. 2 in BMJ Open. In addition, high alcohol consumption was linked to a higher risk of contracting human papillomavirus (HPV), according to a study published Oct. 2 in Sexually Transmitted Infections.

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Major Bleeds Found to Be Rare for Patients With Stable CAD

FRIDAY, Oct. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Major bleeding events are rare in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD); however, concomitant antiplatelet therapy (APT) when oral anticoagulation is required increases bleeding risk -- an independent predictor of mortality -- and should be reconsidered in select patients, according to research published in the Oct. 7 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Second Baby 'Cured' of HIV Suffers Relapse

FRIDAY, Oct. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An Italian toddler thought cured of HIV with early aggressive treatment following birth has suffered a relapse, his doctors report. The 3-year-old child's viral levels of HIV rebounded two weeks after doctors took him off antiretroviral medications, according to a case report published in the Oct. 4 issue of The Lancet. The child's HIV levels had been undetectable since he was 6 months old due to aggressive drug therapy that doctors started within 12 hours of his birth.

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Transient Ischemic Attacks May Lead to PTSD

FRIDAY, Oct. 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) may not cause lasting physical damage but they may increase the risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a study published online Oct. 2 in Stroke.

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Medical Errors Should Be Used to Improve Patient Care

THURSDAY, Oct. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Medical errors occur and should be used to help improve medical processes, according to a report from the American Medical Association.

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Research Supports Free, Long-Acting Birth Control for Teens

THURSDAY, Oct. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Giving teenage girls free birth control -- especially long-acting implanted devices -- could slash pregnancy and abortion rates to well below the current U.S. average, researchers report in the Oct. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Hydrocodone Combo Products Reclassified As Schedule II

THURSDAY, Oct. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A new rule taking effect Oct. 6 reclassifies hydrocodone combination products as Schedule II controlled substances, which will impact prescribing practices for these products, according to a report from the federal Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

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Providers Received Billions From Drug/Device Companies

THURSDAY, Oct. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- About 546,000 doctors and 1,360 teaching hospitals in the United States received billions of dollars from drug and medical device makers in the second half of 2013, according to data released Tuesday by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The financial benefits ranged from research grants to trips, and totaled nearly $3.5 billion from August through December last year, the Associated Press reported.

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In Cancer Prevention, 9-Valent HPV Vaccine Looks Promising

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A vaccine meant to protect against nine types of human papillomavirus (HPV) could prevent 90 percent of all cervical cancers, according to a study published in the October issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Preterm Birth, Pneumonia Leading Causes of Child Mortality

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly two million children younger than 5 died worldwide in 2013 of complications from premature birth and pneumonia, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in The Lancet.

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High Salt Intake + Smoking May Up Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although no link has been found between sodium intake and risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there might be an increased risk for RA among smokers with high sodium consumption, according to research published online Sept. 10 in Rheumatology.

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No Genetic Proof Vitamin D Guards Against Type 2 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- There's no genetic evidence that high levels of vitamin D can prevent type 2 diabetes, according to research published online Oct. 1 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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Social Support May Be Key to Heart Attack Recovery

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Young and middle-aged heart attack survivors are more likely to have poor health and low quality of life if they have fewer family and friends to support them in their recovery, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Obesity Tied to Higher Cancer Risk for CRC Survivors

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who are overweight or obese when diagnosed appear to face a slightly higher risk for developing a second weight-related cancer, according to research published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The finding didn't speak to the risk of CRC recurrence, only the potential for developing other cancers associated with obesity.

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Burnout on the Job Isn't Just About the Work

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Work, non-work, and individual factors explain a considerable part of psychological distress, depression, and emotional exhaustion, according to a study published online July 24 in Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.

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CDC Confirms First Patient Diagnosed With Ebola in U.S.

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The first confirmed case of Ebola has surfaced in the United States, involving a man who recently flew here from Liberia, federal health officials from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced late Tuesday.

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