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September 2009 Briefing - OBGYN & Women's Health

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for September 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Treating Gestational Diabetes Can Reduce Fetal Overgrowth

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of mild gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnant women did not significantly affect stillbirth or perinatal death, but did reduce the risk of fetal overgrowth, according to a study in the Oct. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Data Model May Predict Risk of Future Domestic Abuse

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Readily available patient medical data can be used in a Bayesian model to estimate the future risk of a diagnosis involving domestic abuse, according to a study published Sept. 29 in BMJ.

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Bacterial Infections Are a Factor in Many H1N1 Deaths

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Many patients who have died of H1N1 influenza this year had a bacterial co-infection that likely contributed to their deaths, according to a Sept. 29 early release of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Role of Estrogen Supported in Colorectal Cancer Survival

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The finding that younger women with metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC) survive longer than younger men -- which is not seen in older patients -- supports the idea that estrogen may play a role in improved outcomes in the disease, according to research published online Sept. 29 in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Breast Cancer Outcome Can Be Affected by Social Support

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients who are socially isolated may be more likely to have tumor growth as a result of the stress caused by loneliness, compared to their more socially supported counterparts, according to a study in mice published online Sept. 29 in Cancer Prevention Research.

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Prophylactic Mastectomy Rare Among High-Risk Women

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- It is relatively uncommon for women at high risk for breast cancer, but without diagnosed disease, to opt for prophylactic mastectomy, but women diagnosed with breast cancer are increasingly likely to undergo contralateral mastectomy, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in Cancer.

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Low Back Pain in Pregnancy a Major Health Issue in Iran

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Low back pain (LBP) in pregnancy is an extremely common health problem in Iran, affecting more than 84 percent of women at some point in their pregnancies, according to a study in the October issue of The Spine Journal.

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H1N1 Virus's Genetic Makeup Appears to Be Staying Stable

MONDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The genetic makeup of the H1N1 flu has remained stable, which means the yet-to-be-released vaccine is likely to be a good match for the virus, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced at a Sept. 25 media briefing.

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Early Pregnancy Use of SSRIs and Congenital Defects Studied

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The use of certain selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in early pregnancy is associated with a higher prevalence of septal heart defects in offspring, according to research published online Sept. 23 in BMJ.

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FDA Warns Prescribers About Tamiflu Dosing Errors

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a Public Health Alert to notify pharmacists and prescribers about the potential for dosing errors with oseltamivir (Tamiflu for Oral Suspension).

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Live Birth Has Little Effect on Kidney Transplant Recipients

FRIDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- In women with a functioning kidney transplant, a live birth has no significant effect on either graft or patient survival, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Maternal Bariatric Surgery Tied to Less Offspring Obesity

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery in women before pregnancy helps reduce the risk of childhood obesity and improve cardio-metabolic markers in their offspring by improving the intrauterine environment, according to a study in the October issue of Endocrinology.

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Exercise During Pregnancy Cuts Odds of Overweight Baby

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise during pregnancy lowers the odds of giving birth to an excessively heavy baby, but exercise before pregnancy may not make a difference, according to a study published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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New Tool May Accurately Predict Cervical Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A new tool for assessing cervical cancer risk may offer clinicians a simpler method for making treatment decisions than commonly used management algorithms, according to an article published online Sept. 20 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Risk of Postpartum Bleeding Higher After Cesarean

THURSDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of severe postpartum hemorrhage increases after induction and pre-labor cesarean section, according to a study in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Interventions Could Reduce Maternal Mortality in Africa

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Improved health facilities and greater access to misoprostol and antibiotics in the community could prevent thousands of maternal deaths in Africa annually, according to research published online Sept. 23 in The Lancet.

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Widowhood Affects Sexual Infection Risk in Older Men

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Older men may have an increased risk of sexually transmitted infections after losing a spouse, especially if they take medications for erectile dysfunction, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Review Advises Hand Washing, Other Antiviral Measures

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hand washing, wearing a mask, and isolating potential cases are all effective in interrupting the spread of viral respiratory infections and should be given greater attention when planning for widespread outbreaks, according to research published Sept. 22 in BMJ.

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Spotlight on Social Networking Use Among Medical Students

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A majority of medical schools report instances of medical students posting unprofessional content on social networking Web sites, including some instances of violations of patient confidentiality, according to a report in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Physician Medical Errors Linked to Fatigue and Burnout

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of medical error is associated with a host of factors related to physician fatigue, burnout, and mental and emotional well-being, according to a study in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Obstetric Training Can Be Ranked by Complication Rates

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Residency programs for obstetricians can be ranked for quality by comparing the maternal complications rates for the cohorts of physicians that graduate from the programs, according to a study in the Sept. 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Hot Flush Severity Linked to Estrogen Effects on Vasculature

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Oral estrogen treatment of recently postmenopausal women has adverse effects on vasculature in women with relatively mild hot flushes, suggesting that hot flush severity should be taken into account when assessing hormone therapy, according to a study in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Most Pregnant Women Can Safely Fly

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women can safely fly as long as they do not have any obstetric or other medical complications, according to recommendations from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) published in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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HPV Load in Cervical Tumors Can Affect Relapse, Survival

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Uterine cervical cancer patients with low human papillomavirus (HPV) viral loads in their tumors have a higher risk of cancer relapse after treatment with radiotherapy and exhibit worse disease-free survival, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Overweight Can Complicate Aneuploidy Screening

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Although body mass index does not affect the visual quality of nuchal translucency ultrasound tests, women with a higher body mass index take longer to complete the test and more need transvaginal ultrasound compared with normal weight women, according to a study in the October issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Breast Cancer Prevention Drugs and Cognition Studied

TUESDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The selective estrogen receptor modulators tamoxifen and raloxifene, used for breast cancer prevention in postmenopausal women, have similar effects on cognition, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Scoliosis Surgery Linked to Good Long-Term Outcomes

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In the long term, patients who receive surgical treatment for scoliosis are no more likely to develop low back pain or have an impaired quality of life than the general population, according to two studies in the Sept. 15 issue of Spine.

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Pain Linked to Functional Decline in Middle-Aged Adults

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In middle-aged adults, pain is associated with an accelerated decline in physical function, with mobility limitations similar to those decades older without pain, according to a study in the September issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Frequent Dosing Can Improve Survival in Ovarian Cancer

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- More frequent dosing with paclitaxel combined with carboplatin improves survival in women with advanced ovarian cancer, according to a study published early online Sept. 20 in The Lancet to coincide with the European Cancer Organisation meeting in Berlin.

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Hormone Replacement Linked to Lung Cancer Deaths

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with estrogen plus progestin in postmenopausal women is associated with higher death rates from lung cancer, according to a study published early online Sept. 20 in The Lancet to coincide with the European Cancer Organisation meeting in Berlin. In a related study published the same day in the The Lancet, researchers found that pemetrexed is effective maintenance therapy in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

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Patients' Mistrust Affects Use of Breast Cancer Treatments

MONDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Women's negative attitudes toward treatment and mistrust of the medical delivery system are associated with underuse of adjuvant treatment for early-stage breast cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Study Finds Spanking in Low-Income Toddlers Detrimental

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal age and children's fussiness may be associated with spanking, which appears to be commonly used on toddlers in low-income families, and may have detrimental effects on the child's cognitive development, according to research published in the September/October issue of Child Development.

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Report Finds Adolescent Vaccine Coverage on the Rise

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent vaccine coverage increased in 2008 versus 2007, but further monitoring is needed to track the demographic factors affecting differences in coverage, according to a study in the Sept. 18 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Sleep Aid May Lead to More Acid Reflux Exposure

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The sleep-inducing drug zolpidem may help patients with gastroesophageal reflux sleep through reflux events, increasing their acid exposure, according to research published in the September issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Mediterranean Diet More Costly to Follow Than Western

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Spanish university graduates who tended to follow a Mediterranean diet spent more money for their food than those following a western diet, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Tutorial Improves Doctor Comfort With Down Syndrome

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- An interactive tutorial involving hypothetical patient scenarios improves residents' knowledge and comfort in delivering a diagnosis of Down syndrome, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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HPV Vaccination Acceptance Low in U.K. Minorities

FRIDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) is lower and there are more cultural barriers to acceptance of HPV vaccination among U.K. ethnic minorities than Caucasian women, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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HIV Linked With Increased Risk of Premature Delivery

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-positive women receiving antiretroviral treatment are at higher risk of giving birth prematurely and delivering a low-birth-weight infant, according to a study in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Antibiotics Easy to Find Online Without Prescription

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Easy access to antibiotics without a prescription via the Internet encourages patients to self-medicate and compromises the quality of their care, according to a study in the September/October issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Information Limited on Testing Technologies in Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Although information about the clinical use of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing strategies in breast cancer patients is limited, evidence suggests that there are significant variations in testing practices and important knowledge gaps, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Cancer.

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Taxes on Sugared Sodas Could Cut Consumption

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Imposing a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages could reduce consumption and generate income for obesity reduction and healthy eating education interventions, according to an article published online Sept. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Hispanic/Latino Community Has Unique Cancer Profile

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanics and Latinos have a unique cancer profile that means they are less likely to get the four most common cancers, but are more likely to develop cancers related to infection, according to a report published Sept. 15 by the American Cancer Society.

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Cancer Drug May Increase Risk of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of postmenopausal breast cancer with an aromatase inhibitor increases the risk of developing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), although cases are mild to moderate and do not lead to patients stopping treatment, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Diabetes Drug Combination Can Eliminate Breast Cancers

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancers are virtually eliminated in mice treated with a combination of the diabetes drug metformin and the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin due to their ability to kill cancer stem cells, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Cancer Research.

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FDA Approves Four Vaccines for H1N1 Influenza

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved four H1N1 influenza vaccines, according to a Sept. 15 news release issued by the agency.

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Three Medications Beneficial in Breast Cancer Prevention

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Three medications -- the selective estrogen receptor modulators tamoxifen and raloxifene, and tibolone, a drug not approved in the United States but used in many other countries to treat menopausal symptoms -- may reduce the risk for primary breast cancer. However, the three drugs are variously associated with an increased risk of thromboembolic events, endometrial cancer, or stroke, according to a study published online Sept. 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Joint Pain Can Accompany Aromatase Therapy

TUESDAY, Sept. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal breast cancer patients receiving aromatase inhibitors (AIs) adjunctively can experience joint pain, marked by fluid buildup in joints, localized inflammation of tendon sheaths, and carpal tunnel syndrome, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Parents Discuss Needs During Child Development Talks

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Parents' readiness to hear about their children's possible developmental delays may help primary care providers tailor their communications to better suit the parents' needs, according to research published online Sept. 14 in Pediatrics.

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Drug Interaction E-Alerts Show Benefit to Patient Safety

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Drug interaction alerts from electronic prescribing likely improve patient safety and reduce costs in outpatient care, despite the fact that over 90 percent of the alerts are overridden by physicians, according to a study in the Sept. 14 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

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FDA Clears Test to Help Detect Ovarian Cancer

MONDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- On Sept. 11, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration cleared OVA1, a test that helps detect ovarian cancer in women with pelvic masses requiring surgery. OVA1 was developed by Vermillion Inc., headquartered in Fremont, Calif., in conjunction with researchers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

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More Pregnant Women Need to Get Flu Vaccinations

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of pregnant women in Georgia and Rhode Island vaccinated for influenza has increased in recent years, but the great majority of pregnant women still do not get vaccinated, according to a report in the Sept. 11 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Waist-Hip Ratio Better Predictor of Seniors' Mortality

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In high-functioning older adults, waist-hip ratio is a more accurate predictor of all-cause mortality than either body mass index or waist circumference, according to a study published in the October issue of the Annals of Epidemiology.

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Mutated H1N1 Virus Resistant to Antiviral Drug Oseltamivir

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The discovery of H1N1 mutations resistant to the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir in two adolescent girls sharing a cabin at a North Carolina camp prompted a new recommendation from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the proper prophylactic use of antiviral drugs, according to a case report in the Sept. 11 issue of the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Current Health Policy May Not Serve Young People Well

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- A high proportion of deaths in young people worldwide are due to intentional and unintentional injury, and the current adolescent health policy focus on HIV/AIDS and maternal mortality is not enough to prevent mortality amongst youngsters, according to a study in the Sept. 12 issue of The Lancet.

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Poverty-Mortality Association Unchanged in England

FRIDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Despite myriad medical, public health, social, economic and political changes, the association between poverty and mortality in England and Wales is as strong today as it was at the start of the 20th century, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in BMJ.

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Acupuncture Helps Pregnant Women With Low Back Pain

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A week of continuous auricular acupuncture can reduce pain and disability in pregnant women with low back and posterior pelvic pain, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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More Illness for Term Babies Exposed to Preeclampsia

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Babies who are exposed to preeclampsia are at increased risk of hospitalization for a range of illnesses, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Weight Has Little Impact on Efficacy of Oral Contraception

THURSDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The effectiveness of oral contraception is unaffected by weight or body mass index, and failure rates decline with age and duration of use, according to a study of European users published in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Study Finds Insomnia Common in Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Insomnia may be common in cancer patients in the months after surgical treatment, according to research published online Sept. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Quality of Life Little Affected by Menopausal Transition

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The menopausal transition has relatively little effect on quality of life after adjusting for menopausal symptoms, medical conditions and stress, according to a study in the September/October issue of Menopause.

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Most H1N1 Flu Patients Don't Need Antiviral Medication

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Antiviral medications should be used to treat H1N1 swine flu only in people who are hospitalized from the flu or are at high risk of complications from it, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Lifestyle Factors May Affect Breast Cancer Relapse Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 8 (HealthDay News) -- In women with estrogen receptor-positive invasive breast cancer, three potentially modifiable lifestyle factors -- obesity, current smoking, and alcohol consumption -- may increase the risk of contralateral breast cancer, according to a study published online Sept. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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H1N1 Vaccines Appear Safe for Adults, Children

MONDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The new H1N1 swine flu vaccine appears to be as safe as the seasonal flu variety, according to experts from the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; and, intravenous use of the antiviral zanamivir (Relenza) may provide a lifesaving alternative for severe cases of H1N1 pneumonitis, according to a report published online Sept. 4 in The Lancet.

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Study Supports MRI Use for Renal Lesions in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is acceptable imaging to be performed in women with renal lesions incidentally detected during routine antenatal ultrasonography, according to a study in the September issue of Urology.

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Prenatal Smoking Linked to Different DNA Methylation

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to tobacco smoke in utero may have long-term health effects due to alterations of DNA methylation, according to research published in the September issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Breast Cancer Metastasis Gene Linked to Poor Survival

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Expression of a gene involved in glucose metabolism and cell death is higher in breast cancer brain metastases compared with primary tumors, and high expression is associated with poor survival, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in Molecular Cancer Research.

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Diagnoses, Health Costs Rise in Partners of Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Health care use increases in partners of cancer patients following the cancer diagnosis, according to research published online Aug. 31 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Gene Involved in Osteoporosis Development Identified

THURSDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A gene important in blocking the formation of osteoclasts, which break down bone, promotes osteoporosis in mice if missing, according to a study published online Aug. 30 in Nature Medicine.

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Nadroparin May Prevent Blood Clots During Chemotherapy

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 2 (HealthDay News) -- In patients receiving chemotherapy for metastatic or locally advanced solid cancer, nadroparin may reduce the risk of thromboembolic events, according to a study published online Sept. 1 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Academic Medical Centers Active and Diverse in Research

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Research at academic medical centers is active and diverse, with nearly a quarter of life-science researchers receiving no funding, and relationships with industry more commonly seen among translational and clinical researchers than basic science researchers, according to a study in the Sept. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Minimal Pain Reduction After Pelvic Nerve Ablation

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Laparoscopic surgery with pelvic nerve ablation does not reduce pain or improve quality of life in women with chronic pelvic pain, according to a study in the Sept. 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Surgical, Gradual Menopause Effects on Cognition Compared

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Natural menopause and surgical menopause might have different effects on cognitive function, according to the results of animal research published in the September issue of Endocrinology.

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Findings Point to Link Between Cholesterol and Bone Loss

TUESDAY, Sept. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The RANKL protein may play a role in a relationship between oxidized lipids and immune-mediated bone loss, according to research published online Aug. 22 in Clinical Immunology.

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