See What HealthDay Can Do For You
Contact Us

Time to Colposcopy Varies Based on Age, Pap Findings

With ASC-H findings, younger women have colposcopy sooner than older women

WEDNESDAY, March 10 (HealthDay News) -- Women whose Pap tests reveal low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) or high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) go on to have their recommended colposcopy within a few months, but women with atypical squamous cells, cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASC-H) tend to have the procedure later, according to research published in the March issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Tzy-Mey Kuo, Ph.D., of the Research Triangle Institute International in North Carolina, and colleagues analyzed data from health insurance claims from 4,824 women in a large U.S. health care organization. The women were aged 18 to 64 years and had an abnormal index Pap test of LSIL, ASC-H, or HSIL during 2004.

The researchers found that, in women with ASC-H, younger women were less likely to delay colposcopy than older women. Women whose Pap test found LSIL and HSIL had a similar time to colposcopy regardless of age, but had the procedure sooner than women with ASC-H. Women who received their index Pap test from a gynecologist had a shorter length of time to colposcopy than women who got the test from a family practice or other type of physician.

"From our findings, the timing for follow-up with colposcopy is not consistent for all Pap test results. Interventions that emphasize the importance of timely follow-up of abnormal Pap tests that can lead to cervical cancer are warranted," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Physician's Briefing

HealthDay

HealthDay is the world’s largest syndicator of health news and content, and providers of custom health/medical content.

Consumer Health News

A health news feed, reviewing the latest and most topical health stories.

Professional News

A news feed for Health Care Professionals (HCPs), reviewing latest medical research and approvals.