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Elective Induction of Labor Increases Complications

Induction for non-recognized indications at term ups risk of cesarean section, complications

FRIDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Induction of labor for non-recognized indications (elective induction of labor) at term is associated with an increased risk of cesarean section delivery and other complications, according to a large cohort study published in the February issue of Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica.

Rosalie M. Grivell, B.M.B.S., from the University of Adelaide in Australia, and colleagues conducted a cohort study of 28,626 women with spontaneous onset of labor, or induction of labor for recognized or non-recognized indications, to assess maternal and neonatal outcomes associated with birth at term by gestational age and by type of onset of labor.

The researchers found that induction of labor for non-recognized indications correlated with a significantly increased risk of cesarean section delivery (relative risk, 1.67) and other adverse outcomes. Birth between 38 and 39 weeks of gestation, and with the spontaneous onset of labor, was associated with the lowest risk of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes.

"Induction of labor for non-recognized indications at term is associated with an increased risk of adverse outcomes. Caution is warranted with a liberal policy of induction of labor at term in an otherwise uncomplicated pregnancy," the authors write.

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