January 2009 Briefing - OBGYN & Women's Health

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for January 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Number of Low Birth Weight Babies Rises in Massachusetts

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The steady rise in the number of low birth weight babies in Massachusetts from 1997 to 2004 can only partially be explained by the increased use of assisted reproductive technology, according to a report published in the Jan. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More Information

Human Papillomavirus Load Linked to Cervical Cytology

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Levels of human papillomavirus-18 (HPV-18) DNA in cervical tissue are only associated with the severity of cervical cytology in women who do not go on to develop a precursor to cervical cancer, according to a report published in the Feb. 4 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

US Outpatient Surgeries Increasingly Common

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Outpatient surgery visits are rising in the United States, with the number increasing from 20.8 million in 1996 to 34.7 million in 2006. They now account for nearly two-thirds of all surgery visits compared to about half of all surgery visits in 1996, according to a report issued Jan. 28 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More Information

Mammography Benefits High-Risk Women in Late 30s

FRIDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDay News) -- For women carrying mutations in the BRCA gene, who are advised to begin mammography screening at as early as 25 to 30 years of age, the reduction in breast cancer mortality outweighs the risk of radiation-induced cancer mortality in women screened annually at 35 to 39 years of age but maybe not younger age groups, according to the results of a study published in the Feb. 4 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text

Newer Antidepressants Not All the Same

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- There are significant differences in terms of efficacy and acceptability between 12 new-generation antidepressants, according to an article published online Jan. 29 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bisphenol A Levels Do Not Decrease with Fasting

THURSDAY, Jan. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphenol A, an industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics, epoxy resins and polyvinyl chloride plastic, may accumulate in body tissue or be ingested via substantial non-food sources, according to study findings published online Jan. 28 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Full Text

Weight Loss Reduces Urinary Incontinence in Obese Women

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In overweight and obese women with urinary incontinence, a six-month weight-loss program significantly reduces the frequency of self-reported incontinence episodes, researchers report in the Jan. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Clopidogrel/Proton Pump Inhibitor Combo Questioned

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Heart attack patients who take both clopidogrel and a proton pump inhibitor other than pantoprazole have an increased risk of reinfarction and may lose the beneficial effects of clopidogrel, according to research published online Jan. 28 in CMAJ, the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Full Text

Longer Antibiotic Regimen Superior in Pregnant Women

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A one-day regimen of the antibiotic nitrofurantoin is markedly less effective than a seven-day regimen to treat asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women, according to research published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Keeping Ovaries Safe in Some Endometrial Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Premenopausal women with early-stage endometrial cancer do not have higher odds of five-year survival if they undergo oophorectomy in addition to hysterectomy, according to study findings published online Jan. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

British Breast Screening Leaflet Lacks Information

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The U.K. breast cancer screening information leaflet, "Breast Screening: the Facts," downplays the risks of screening to the extent that it cannot be relied upon to help a patient make a genuinely informed decision, according to an article published online Jan. 27 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

Low Mammogram Rates Among Pediatric Cancer Survivors

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Despite recommended guidelines, a number of women who received chest radiation for a childhood cancer have not had mammography screening for breast cancer in the previous two years, according to the results of a study published in the Jan. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Counseling Helps Prevent Excessive Pregnancy Weight Gain

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Excessive weight gain during pregnancy is effectively prevented with a consistent counseling program focused on diet and lifestyle, according to an article published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

AHA Supports Omega-6 for Possible Heart Protection

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association recommends that at least 5 to 10 percent of individuals' calories should come from omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, according to a science advisory published online Jan. 26 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Clinical Information Technology Leads to Safer Hospitals

TUESDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals that make use of clinical information technology to automate notes, records, order entry and clinical decision support have lower mortality rates, fewer complications and also save money, according to a report published in the Jan. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Prolonged Use of Loop Diuretics May Raise Fracture Risk

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women who use loop diuretics are at increased risk of fractures, according to a report published in the Jan. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Predictors of Contralateral Breast Cancer Identified

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In unilateral breast cancer patients, evaluating five-year Gail risk and histologic findings in the ipsilateral breast may predict the risk of developing cancer in the other breast and help clinicians decide whether or not to perform a contralateral prophylactic mastectomy, according to an article published online Jan. 26 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Meditation Practice Linked to Less Pain Sensitivity

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Experience in Zen meditation is associated with reduced pain sensitivity, a finding supporting the value of mindfulness-based meditation, according to research published in the January issue of Psychosomatic Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rates of Severe Obstetric Complications on the Rise

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Severe obstetric complications have occurred at an increasing rate, and many are associated with a mirrored increase in the rate of Caesarean deliveries, according to research published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Teenage Obesity Linked to Poor Maternal-Fetal Outcomes

MONDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obesity in teenage mothers is associated with an increased risk for adverse perinatal outcomes, according to research published in the February issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Single HIV Variants Found in Heterosexual Transmission

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Most individuals who become infected with HIV through their spouse are infected with a single viral variant, according to a report published online Jan. 23 in PLoS Pathogens. The study also found that individuals who become infected with multiple viral variants often have inflammatory genital infections, suggesting that the mucosal barrier is largely responsible for the genetic bottleneck.

Full Text

Spousal Violence Increases Odds of Fetal Loss

FRIDAY, Jan. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Women whose husbands are violent toward them are more likely to experience single or recurrent fetal loss, researchers report in the Jan. 24 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Ethical HIV Testing in Poor Countries Needed

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Testing a patient's blood without their consent for HIV is important for HIV surveillance, but needs to be carefully implemented in developing countries to ensure that testing is done ethically, according to an article published online Jan. 20 in PLoS Medicine.

Full Text

Vaginal Herpes Microbicide Protects Against Infection

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A vaginal microbicide targeting a herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) gene and a host gene protects mice against infection for a week, researchers report in the Jan. 22 issue of Cell Host & Microbe.

Abstract
Full Text

Baby with Seizures Had Rickets and Anemia

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- A 9-month-old baby who presented with seizures and a bulging fontanelle was diagnosed as having rickets due to vitamin D deficiency, iron deficiency anemia and severe protein-calorie malnutrition, according to a case report published in the Jan. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Peanut Butter Crackers, Dog Snacks Among Recalled Items

THURSDAY, Jan. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The list of recalled products resulting from the recent Salmonella typhimurium outbreak has grown, and officials believe a processing plant in Blakely, Ga., may be the source of the outbreak, according to officials speaking at a teleconference conducted Jan. 21 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More Information

Facial Injury Patterns Indicate Types of Violence

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A particular pattern of facial injury in women, including periorbital injuries and intracranial injuries, is indicative of intimate partner violence, allowing medical professionals to more easily identify victims of abuse, according to a study published in the January/February issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Increased Mortality Linked to Topical Retinoid Usage

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Topical tretinoin, a frequently prescribed retinoid cream, is associated with increased all-cause mortality, according to study results published in the January issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Women's Blood Mercury Levels Vary Geographically

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- In recent years, among American women of childbearing age, elevated blood mercury has been more common in those living in coastal areas, and broken down by region, the Northeast has had the highest percentage of women with blood concentrations above a level of concern, according to research published in the January Environmental Health Perspectives.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Maternal La Crosse Encephalitis Virus Identified

MONDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The first known case of La Crosse encephalitis virus (LACV) infection in a pregnant woman, with evidence of possible congenital infection of her infant, occurred in 2006-2007 in West Virginia, according to a report published in the Jan. 16 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

US Cancer Screening Uptake Still Suboptimal

FRIDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Use of colonoscopy for colorectal cancer screening nearly doubled between 2000 to 2005, but screening rates for breast and cervical cancer have remained flat, according to a report from the American Cancer Society published in the January/February issue of CA, A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

Abstract
Full Text

Combined Screening More Effective for Cervical Cancer

FRIDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Screening for cervical cancer by first testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA followed by triaging with cytology and further HPV tests is more effective than performing a Pap smear alone, according to research published online Jan. 13 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

In-Home Intervention Can Help Postpartum Moms

FRIDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Specially trained "health visitors" offering in-home psychological interventions to new mothers were associated with reduced symptoms of depression, according to research published online Jan. 15 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

Sepsis Treatment Not Tied to Benefit in Premature Infants

FRIDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The prophylactic use of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor was not associated with a reduction in systemic sepsis or mortality in extremely premature infants, according to research published in the Jan. 17 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Surgery Lowers Cancer Risk Linked to Gene Mutations

THURSDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO), the removal of an ovary together with the fallopian tube, is strongly linked to reducing the risk of breast and gynecologic cancers, according to a report published online Jan. 13 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Telephone Follow-Up Effective in Breast Cancer Patients

THURSDAY, Jan. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Among women treated for breast cancer who have a low-to-moderate risk of recurrence, telephone follow-up is a well-received and convenient intervention with no associated physical or psychological drawbacks, according to research published online Jan. 14 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

In Vitro Fertilization Can Best Help Younger Women

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In vitro fertilization can help younger women overcome infertility, but it cannot reverse the effects of age on fertility, researchers report in the Jan. 15 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Evidence Scarce for Herbal Menopause Remedies

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Studies examining the use of black cohosh for menopausal symptoms are equivocal, and little evidence supports or refutes the benefits of some other commonly used herbal products, according to a review published in the January Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin, a publication of BMJ Journals.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Diet High in DHA May Benefit Girls Born Prematurely

TUESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- In premature girls, a diet containing high-dose docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was associated with improved scores at 18 months' corrected age on a test of mental development, according to research published in the Jan. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

No Consensus on the Pill and Cardiovascular Risks

TUESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- There is no clear consensus on the possible protective benefits of oral contraceptives against atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events, researchers report in the Jan. 20 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Rates of Chlamydia, Syphilis Rising in United States

TUESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Noteworthy elements in the U.S. surveillance of sexually transmitted diseases for 2007 include a high rate of chlamydia, especially in women; increasing syphilis, especially in men who have sex with men; and ongoing racial disparities, according to an annual report issued Jan. 13 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More Information

Hormone Therapy Linked to Reduced Brain Size

TUESDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women receiving hormone treatment have reductions in brain volume and cognitive deficits, although there are no significant changes in ischemic brain lesion volume, according to two studies published in the Jan. 13 issue of Neurology.

Abstract - Resnick
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Racial Disparity Seen in US Spina Bifida Decline

MONDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration mandate to add folic acid to all enriched cereal grain products by January 1998 has led to a significant decrease in the prevalence of spina bifida among non-Hispanic black mothers but not among other racial/ethnic groups, according to a report published Jan. 9 in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More Information

Labor Patterns Differ for Vaginal and Caesarean Delivery

FRIDAY, Jan. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The direction and timing of contractions during labor are different for vaginal and Caesarean deliveries, according to study findings published in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Menopausal Hormone Therapy Tied to Less Colorectal Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Hormone therapy during menopause was associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, particularly estrogen plus progestin use, according to research published in the January issue of Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

US Teen Births Up Again in 2006 After 14-Year Decline

THURSDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Teen births in the United States rose by 3 percent in 2006 after 14 straight years of decline, according to a report, Births: Final Data for 2006, issued this week by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

More Information

Night-Shift Nurses at Higher Risk of Early Preterm Birth

THURSDAY, Jan. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Nurses who work part-time may be at lower risk of preterm birth, while those who work night shifts are at higher risk of early, but not late, preterm birth, according to research published in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text

Postponing Elective Caesarean May Prevent Adverse Events

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Adverse events that may occur following an elective Caesarean delivery at 37 weeks' gestation may be preventable if delivery is postponed to 39 weeks, according to study findings published in the Jan. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Ovarian Cancer Risk Higher in Obese Women

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Obese women are at modestly higher risk of developing ovarian cancer, particularly if they never used menopausal hormone therapy, according to a report published online Jan. 6 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Selenium Decreases Bladder Cancer Risk in Some Patients

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Although selenium has no overall association with bladder cancer, high concentrations may decrease the risk in women and moderate smokers and increase the risk in heavy smokers, according to a report in the January issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

Abstract
Full Text

School-Age Activities May Have Lasting Bone Benefits

TUESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Weight-bearing exercise at a young age may offer benefits to bone health 40 years later, according to research published online Jan. 5 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Breast Cancer Test Unable to Detect Aggressive Subtype

TUESDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- An automated diagnostic test approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to detect circulating breast cancer cells is unable to detect a particularly aggressive subtype of these cells, researchers report in the Jan. 7 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text

Cervical Cancer Cofactors Linked to Secondary Cancers

MONDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Among survivors of cervical cancer, the risk of a second smoking-related cancer is significantly higher in cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients than in adenocarcinoma patients, according to study findings published online Dec. 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Oral Bisphosphonate Use Linked to Osteonecrosis of the Jaw

MONDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Osteonecrosis of the jaw may be more common in people who have used the oral bisphosphonate Fosamax than data has previously reported, especially following tooth extraction, according to an article published online Jan. 1 in the Journal of the American Dental Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Short Maternity Leaves Don't Foster Breast-Feeding

FRIDAY, Jan. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Among full-time working women, a short maternity leave is associated with an increased risk of either not establishing breast-feeding or breast-feeding cessation, according to study findings published in the January issue of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Antioxidants Not Seen to Reduce Women's Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The use of supplemental vitamins C and E and beta-carotene -- all antioxidants -- does not appear to reduce the incidence of total cancer or cancer mortality in middle-aged and older women, according to research published in the Jan. 7 Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Osteoporosis Drug Increases Bone-Resorbing Cells

THURSDAY, Jan. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term treatment with the osteoporosis drug alendronate is associated with a higher number of bone-resorbing osteoclasts that are often abnormal in appearance and undergoing protracted death, researchers report in the Jan. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Physician's Briefing