Acquire the license to the best health content in the world
Contact Us

May 2009 Briefing - OBGYN & Women's Health

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for May 2009. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Nonobstetric D&Cs Linked to Low Complication Rate

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- The intraoperative complication rate for nonobstetric dilation and curettage (D&C) procedures in a sample of women was relatively low, according to research published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Full text

Medical School Faculty, Students Conflict Over Priorities

FRIDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Medical school faculty and new physicians who have completed internship training hold differing views about the procedures that are essential to learn during internship, according to a study published in the April issue of Medical Teacher.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cervical Testing Rates Too Low in Women With Bowel Disease

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) -- who may be at higher risk of cervical abnormalities due to immunosuppressant use -- may have suboptimal screening rates for cervical dysplasia and cancer, according to research published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Perimenopause Temporarily Affects Cognitive Performance

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Perimenopause may be associated with some declines in cognitive performance which return to premenopausal levels after menopause, and hormone therapy has differential effects on cognitive performance depending on the time of initiation, according to a study in the May 26 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Computerized Prescription Order Errors a Risk for Patients

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Computerized provider order entry systems are prone to input errors that may put patients at risk, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Focus on Meaningful Work Protects Doctors From Burnout

THURSDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Academic faculty physicians who focus on what they find most meaningful are less likely to experience burnout, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cancer Deaths Reported Down Between 1990 and 2005

THURSDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- A 19.2 percent drop in cancer deaths in men and an 11.4 percent drop in women avoided about 650,000 cancer deaths between 1990 and 2005, according to the American Cancer Society's annual report of cancer statistics in CA, A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Better Rat Model of Epilepsy in Women Developed

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- A better animal model of epilepsy in women has been developed where the animals retain reproductive function, which may allow better study of epilepsy where seizures occur during specific stages of the menstrual cycle, according to a study published online May 14 in Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Tamoxifen Recommended to Reduce Breast Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Tamoxifen and raloxifene can reduce the risk of breast cancer in high-risk women, according to updated guidelines published online May 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. In a related study in the same issue, weekly treatment of metastatic breast cancer with an albumin-bound form of paclitaxel improves survival compared with docetaxel.

Abstract - Visvanathan
Full Text
Abstract - Gradishar
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lower-Insurance Mortality Unaffected by Comorbidities

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Comorbidity levels do not explain why patients with colorectal cancer who have private insurance have lower death rates than patients who are uninsured or have government insurance, according to a study published online May 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. In a related study in the same issue, hospital factors such as quality can help explain some of the higher mortality in black patients with breast or colon cancer.

Abstract - Robbins
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Breslin
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Repeat Caesareans Linked to Neonatal Respiratory Problems

WEDNESDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Infants born via elective repeat Caesarean delivery may face a higher risk of certain adverse outcomes, and the rate of delivery hospitalizations involving hypertensive disorders has risen significantly in recent years, according to two studies published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract - Kamath
Full Text - Kamath
Abstract - Kuklina
Full Text - Kuklina (subscription or payment may be required)

Adjuvant Treatment for Breast Cancer Low in Poor Women

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Only 64 percent of poor insured women with breast cancer fill prescriptions for adjuvant hormonal treatment, even though this is known to reduce cancer mortality, according to a study published online May 18 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Patients Have Strong Ideas About Electronic Records

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients expect increased use of electronic personal health records to transform the way they interact with the health care system, and their opinions could help strengthen the design of new patient record technologies, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gestational Diabetes Provides a Chance to Educate Patients

TUESDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Because women with gestational diabetes are at increased risk of subsequently developing type 2 diabetes, increasing awareness among both physicians and patients about the risk can be used as an opportunity to promote behavior that may delay or prevent the disease, according to a study published in the May 23 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial
Comment

Multivitamins Linked to Longer Telomere Length

MONDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Women who take multivitamins may have longer leukocyte telomere length, suggesting that multivitamin usage may help slow the aging process, according to a study first published in the June 1 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Many Black Women Forgo Late Stage Breast Cancer Treatment

MONDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- There are distinct clinical characteristics associated with black women who have stage III breast cancer, and understanding the reasons why many of them refuse treatment is key to improving compliance rates, according to a study published online on May 22 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Daily Glucose Self-Monitoring May Reduce Macrosomia Risk

MONDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Daily glucose self-monitoring in women with diet-treated gestational diabetes may be associated with a lower risk of delivering an oversized infant than routine weekly monitoring, according to research published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Meth Use May Be Growing More Common in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- In recent years, methamphetamine use has become much more common in pregnant women admitted into substance abuse treatment facilities, according to research published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Age Linked to Positive Lymph Nodes in Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Women with early breast cancer are less likely to have positive lymph nodes with increasing age up to the age of 70 years, but are more likely to have positive lymph nodes with increasing age above 70, according to a study published online May 18 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Vitamin D Linked to Outcomes in Early Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Women with early breast cancer who are deficient in vitamin D have a higher risk of distant recurrences and death, according to a study published online May 18 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Breast Tumors Linked to Depression and Anxiety

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- The mere presence of breast tumors in rats is associated with depression and anxiety, according to a study published online May 18 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Democrats Set Ambitious Goal for Health Care Reform

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Congressional Democrats face formidable challenges in their efforts to pass health care reform legislation by July 31, but physicians can take the lead to ensure changes are enacted, according to two perspectives published online May 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text - Iglehart
Full Text - Fisher

Pregnancy Linked to Poorer Thyroid, Parathyroid Outcomes

THURSDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women who undergo thyroid or parathyroid surgery are more likely to have worse clinical outcomes than non-pregnant women in terms of complications and length of stay, according to research published in the May issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text

Sticking to Work Hours Limits Very Costly

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to the 2003 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) limits on work hours, and other measures aimed at reducing fatigue among residents, would be costly with no proven benefits, according to an article published in the May 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Antihypertensive Drugs Also Benefit Non-Hypertensives

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- In everyone at risk for heart attack or stroke -- including those with normal blood pressure -- antihypertensive treatment significantly reduces the risk of coronary heart disease events and stroke, according to a study published online May 19 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Personalized Support Helps Improve Diet and Fitness

WEDNESDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- An e-mail-based intervention with personalized content can help people eat more healthily and do more physical activity, according to a study published online May 19 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Low-Income Breast Cancer Patients Often Forgo Therapy

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- In low-income, insured women with breast cancer, the use of adjuvant hormonal therapy is low, according to a study published online May 18 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Syphilis Screening During Pregnancy Beneficial

TUESDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Universal screening for syphilis during pregnancy is associated with reduced rates of congenital syphilis, supporting screening recommendations published in 2004, according to a review in the May 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text

Family Activities Linked to Teens' Sexual Behaviors

MONDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Participating in more family activities may be associated with fewer risky sexual behaviors in teenagers, according to research published May 15 in Child Development.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Added Taxane Has No Survival Benefit in Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- The sequential addition of a taxane to adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy does not improve survival compared with standard chemotherapy in women with invasive operable breast cancer, according to a study in the May 16 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Virtual Laparoscopy Training Superior to Standard Training

FRIDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Danish gynecology students trained in laparoscopic surgery using a virtual simulator scored substantially higher on a proficiency scale than those receiving standard clinical training, according to research published online May 14 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Standard Chemo Found Superior to Capecitabine

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Standard adjuvant chemotherapy was superior to capecitabine for treating older women with early breast cancer, though with substantial toxicity, according to research published in the May 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Women Are Forgoing Health Care More Than Men

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Cost-related access problems disproportionately affect women, with 52 percent in 2007 reporting problems gaining access to the heath care they needed, compared with 39 percent of men, according to a report published May 11 by The Commonwealth Fund.

Abstract
Full Text

Folate Fortification Law Linked to Decreased Heart Defects

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- After a Canadian law mandating the fortification of flour and pasta products with folate went into effect in 1998, the birth prevalence of severe congenital defects has decreased in Quebec, according to a study published online May 12 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Early Breast Cancer Often Not Monitored After Surgery

WEDNESDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Women who undergo breast-conserving surgery for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) often do not receive long-term surveillance mammography, according to a study published online May 11 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Exercise and Diet Support Slows Cancer Survivor Decline

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise, diet and weight loss support can slow the functional decline of long-term cancer survivors, according to a study in the May 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Questionnaire Helps Patients Identify Health Priorities

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Asking patients if they want help with a specific addiction or mood disorder now or later helps them prioritize their health issues, according to a study published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine, while a second study shows that a 15-symptom questionnaire can help identify patients with somatoform disorders.

Abstract - Goodyear-Smith
Full Text
Abstract - van Ravesteijn
Full Text

More Cancer Screening Raises Odds of False Positives

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have 14 or more cancer screening tests have at least a 50 percent chance of a false-positive result, according to a study published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine, while another study in the same issue classifies the ways in which patients may contribute to errors in their medical care.

Abstract - Croswell
Full Text
Abstract - Buetow
Full Text

Specific Diet May Reduce Risk of Heart Failure

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged and older Swedish women who adhere to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet are significantly less likely to develop heart failure, according to a study in the May 11 Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Drug Promotional Items Affect Medical Students' Preference

TUESDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Medical students who are exposed to small branded promotional items from pharmaceutical companies may be more likely to hold favorable views of the advertised drug. However, the opposite effect may occur among students who attend schools with restrictive policies toward pharmaceutical marketing, according to a study published in the May 11 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Rise in Syphilis Cases Due to Heterosexual Contact

MONDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Data on rates of syphilis in Jefferson County, Ala., indicate a re-emergence of the disease among women and heterosexual men, according to a report in the May 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Three Genes Linked to Breast Cancer Metastases

FRIDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Three different genes may mediate the spread of breast cancer to the brain, according to a study published online May 6 in Nature.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Premenstrual Syndrome Relapse Affected by Treatment Length

THURSDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Women with premenstrual syndrome had a higher relapse rate after short-term sertraline treatment compared with long-term treatment, according to research published in the May Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Visceral Fat-Depression Link Explored in Women

WEDNESDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged women with depression tend to have more visceral fat than their nondepressed counterparts, which could explain why they are at higher risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online April 27 in Psychosomatic Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Medical Center Press Releases Often Lacking Key Details

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Press releases from academic medical centers may often overstate the importance of research findings while failing to acknowledge relevant limitations of the studies, according to research published in the May 5 Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text

Evidence Supports Folic Acid for Neural Tube Protection

TUESDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- New evidence continues to support the use of folic acid supplementation for preventing neural tube defects, according to research published in the May 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Full Text - Study
Full Text - Recommendation Summary

Evidence Supports Heritability of Breast-Tissue Composition

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Breast water -- which is correlated with mammographic density -- is higher in young women, which may point to a factor related to susceptibility to breast carcinogens at younger ages, according to research published online April 30 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Alcohol Abstention Advice to Pregnant Women Paternalistic

MONDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Advising pregnant women to abstain entirely from alcohol is both paternalistic and ethically dubious, according to an article published in the May issue of the Journal of Medical Ethics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Progesterone Activator Involved in Endometriosis

MONDAY, MAY 4 (HealthDay News) -- Women with endometriosis have impaired expression and cycle-dependent regulation of a progesterone receptor co-activator, which may explain progesterone resistance in endometrium from these women, according to a study published online April 23 in Endocrinology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Wrong Approach to Obesity Can Alienate Patients

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- When physicians tackle the issue of obesity with their black patients, they may unintentionally alienate them if they do not use the right timing and approach, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

More Americans Reporting Disability

FRIDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- The number of Americans reporting disabilities rose by 7.7 percent from 44.1 million in 1999 to 47.5 million in 2005, according to a report in the May 1 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More Information

Physician's Briefing