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April 2006 Briefing - Ophthalmology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Ophthalmology for April 2006. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Novel Disorder Includes Microphthalmia, Brain Atrophy

MONDAY, April 24 (HealthDay News) -- Norwegian and Dutch researchers have identified a new autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder called microphthalmia brain atrophy (MOBA) disease that is most likely caused by a mutation affecting eye development during gestation, according to a study published in the April issue of the Annals of Neurology.

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Lawnmower Injuries More Common in Teens, Elderly

THURSDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- People aged 60 to 69 are the most likely to be injured in a lawnmower accident, followed by adolescents aged 15 to 19 years, according to a study published online in April in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. There was a trend towards increased lawnmower injuries in the United States between 1996 and 2004, suggesting more should be done to prevent such injuries, the report indicates.

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Triamcinolone Shots Improve Vision But Monitoring Needed

WEDNESDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Macular edema arising from a variety of retinal disorders can be treated effectively with intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide injections, but patients should be monitored for increases in intraocular pressure and cataract formation, according to a report in the April issue of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

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LASIK Surgery Review Addresses Complications

MONDAY, April 17 (HealthDay News) -- Like other procedures, LASIK surgery can result in complications that threaten otherwise healthy eyes, but proper patient selection and care before, during and after surgery can help minimize the risk, according to a review in the April issue of American Journal of Ophthalmology. The report addresses recognition and management of four major groups of complications.

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Intermediate Uveitis in Children May Be Self-Limiting

MONDAY, April 17 (HealthDay News) -- In children, intermediate uveitis might resolve after several years, according to a study published in the April issue of the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

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Fusarium Keratitis May Be Linked To Saline Solution

TUESDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with microbial keratitis should be evaluated for possible Fusarium keratitis, a rare but serious fungal infection that is thought to have occurred in more than 100 U.S. patients in 17 states, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Many of the cases were reported in patients who wear soft contact lenses and have used Bausch & Lomb's ReNu brand contact lens solution or a generic brand manufactured by the same company.

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Minocycline Injections Help Retinal Cells Survive in Rats

TUESDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Minocycline injections boost the survival of retinal ganglion cells in rats with experimental glaucoma or optic nerve transection, according to research published in the April issue of Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Vision Problems Associated with Lower Cognitive Function

MONDAY, April 10 (HealthDay News) -- Poor vision and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are linked to lower cognitive performance in older persons, according to the 16th report from the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) Research Group published in the April issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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New Labeling for Macugen After Adverse Reports

MONDAY, April 10 (HealthDay News) -- Due to post-marketing reports of anaphylactic reactions in some patients, Pfizer is updating the product labeling for Macugen (pegaptanib sodium injection), which is indicated for the treatment of neovascular (wet) age-related macular degeneration, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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New Lens May Correct Presbyopia Without Bifocals

THURSDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have designed an eyeglass lens that can change its focusing power and may be useful in correcting presbyopia without bifocals, according to a study published online April 5 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

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Collagen Gene Mutation May Cause Stroke Susceptibility

WEDNESDAY, April 5 (HealthDay News) -- A mutation in the procollagen type IV alpha1 (Col4a1) gene in mice leaves the brain fragile and susceptible to hemorrhage, according to a report published in the April 6 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The authors found a similar mutation in a French family with small-vessel disease and a history of fatal intracerebral hemorrhage, retinal hemorrhage, infantile hemiparesis and migraine with aura.

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Editorial

Diabetes Care Improving, But Still Short of Optimal

TUESDAY, April 4 (HealthDay News) -- Although the quality of diabetes care has become better over the past decade, many diabetics still have poor glycemic control, LDL cholesterol control and blood pressure control, according to a study published April 4 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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