Dec. 2005 Briefing - Ophthalmology

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Ophthalmology for December 2005. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Antioxidants Cut Risk of Age-Related Eye Disease

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A diet high in beta-carotene, vitamins C and E, iron and zinc can significantly reduce the incidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), researchers report in the Dec. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dietary intake appears to be more important than supplements in terms of risk prevention, the authors say.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Coma Outcomes on Soap Operas Too Good to Be True

TUESDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Coma patients in soap operas experience significantly rosier outcomes than their real-life counterparts, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

Abstract
Full Text

Sorry, Celebrants: Hangover Cures Don't Work

MONDAY, Dec. 26 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that there is no conventional or complementary intervention that will prevent or treat a hangover, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

Abstract
Full Text

Short Drinks May Have More Kick Than Tall Ones

MONDAY, Dec. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Because of human perceptual bias, alcoholic beverages mixed in short, wide tumblers may be more potent than those mixed in taller and more slender highball glasses, according to a study published in the Dec. 24 issue of the British Medical Journal.

Abstract
Full Text

Active, Passive Smokers at Risk of Macular Degeneration

THURSDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking significantly increases the risk of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in both smokers and their non-smoking partners, according to a study published in the January issue of the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
Full Text

Glaucoma More Common Among Siblings of Patients

THURSDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Brothers and sisters of patients with glaucoma are significantly more likely to develop the condition themselves, according to a study published in the January issue of the British Journal of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hospital 'Handoffs' Common Source of Medical Errors

TUESDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Poor communication during hospital "handoffs," when patient care transitions from one physician or team of physicians to the next, may be responsible for many of the estimated 44,000 to 98,000 deaths that occur each year in U.S. hospitals due to medical errors, according to a study published in the December issue of Academic Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Oklahoma Indians Have High Prevalence of Eye Disorders

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Oklahoma Indians have a higher prevalence of eye disorders than many other ethnic groups, investigators report in the December issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Reimbursement Affects Cataract Surgery Rates, Costs

TUESDAY, Dec. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with fee-for-service, contact capitation reimbursement is associated with significant decreases in cataract extraction rates and costs, according to a study published in the December issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
Full Text

Enhanced Vision Found in Patients with Deuteranomaly

FRIDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with deuteranomaly, the most common form of color blindness, may actually have enhanced vision of some colors, according to a study published in the Dec. 6 issue of Current Biology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

FDA Warns Eyedrops Contaminated with Bacteria

THURSDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned consumers this week not to use Miracle II Neutralizer and Miracle II Neutralizer Gel products because they are bacterially contaminated and could cause severe infections.

More Information

FDA Approves First Human Recombinant Hyaluronidase

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first recombinant version of human hyaluronidase, Hylenex, for use as an adjuvant to increase the absorption and dispersion of other injected drugs.

More Information -- Halozyme
More Information -- Label

Physician's Briefing